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76 fender precision help

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Loud Noises, Nov 6, 2013.


  1. Hey guys. I could use your help. I just picked up a fender 76 American precision from a guy who didn't want to restore it so he sold it to me for 20 bucks (lucky I know) anyways it needs some new tuners and I was wondering if the 70s ri would fit it. Also be welcome to any other tuners that would work. Amazingly despite some water damage the pickups and pots still work and the only replacement looks to be the tone pot. Thanks guys. I can't wait to get her up and running for live shows. Hopefully the pics upload from my phone.
     
  2. Here we go. Sorry they didn't work the first time
     

    Attached Files:

  3. musicman666

    musicman666

    Sep 11, 2011
    ca
    Don't waste your time restoring that thing! PM me and I will give you 40 bucks! I will even pay for the shipping!
    Seriously though, looks like it needs a lot of work! Sorry I cant help with anything. Great score! Congrats!
     
  4. musicman666

    musicman666

    Sep 11, 2011
    ca
    Oh! Please post pics when it's done!
     
  5. It looks worse than it was. I like the beat up look so I'm not going to try to make it look new. I cleaned it and it looks a lot better. It really only needs new tuners and a new nut. And the finish sanded off the back. But other than that it's gonna be a sweet old bass.
     
  6. makaspar

    makaspar Supporting Member

    Oct 23, 2009
    Austin, TX
    Let's see some more pictures and details!
     
  7. The neck is dirty and the laquer paint is peeling but it's 100% straight. Is the bone nut worth the extra money or if I have it cut by a great luthier is the synthetic fine?
     

    Attached Files:

  8. Hey is that oly white in color or is the finish removed and its natural? I cant tell. Since at this point being period correct isnt a big deal 70 RI tuners would fit and dont throw away the remains of anything original no matter how trashed because you could actually sell whats left of those tuners for more then the 70 RI ones cost. Which I would, keeps money in your pocket, makes bass more functional. Other will say it devalues it , but at this point its worth maybe $400-500.

    Is the bridge bent? I can see its missing saddles.

    I would sand the back of the neck smooth and even. A light sand to remove the old finish to barewood and tru oil it. It would give it a better appearance and feel (more then likely)
     
  9. It's natural finish. I actually got offered 450 by someone for it as is. Since the pickups and neck are original and in good shape it's worth more than I thought. I'm a player though and want it for myself. Yeah. The bridge is bent so I got a new one. Might sell the old one if I can get money for it.
     
  10. godofthunder59

    godofthunder59 God of Thunder and Rock and Roll Supporting Member

    Feb 19, 2006
    Rochester NY USA
    Endorsing Cataldo Basses, Whirlwind products, Thunderbucker pickups
    Nice score!
     
  11. Davbassdude

    Davbassdude

    Mar 16, 2012
    Florida
    If you use a Brass nut, I think you will enjoy the added sustain. When the crappy nut cracked on the early 70's Precision I owned, I was glad it was replaced with a Brass nut. While I prefer the 70's Fenders made in Fullerton, I am not a purist. I'm not a fan of the stock Fender Bass bridges and would immediately replace it with a Badass II bridge, for the increased sustain and sound quality.
     
  12. Dan55

    Dan55

    Apr 26, 2006
    Atlanta
    You can buy the genuine Fender replacement parts from multiple sources. Synthetic nut is fine, replica tuners from that era are readily available as are the bridge parts. Fix it, string it up, adjust it, plug it in and go make us proud!

    Dan
     
  13. I got a real good deal on a fender style bridge because I wasn't sure If I wanted to upgraded to a badass at some point (they were recommended somewhere on here and cost 12 bucks with shipping so I figured it was worth it) what do brass nuts normally cost and this bass was made in Fullerton according to the database when I looked up the serial number (could be wrong) man does it look cool though. And I tested it with my mexi jazz bass neck and bridge to see how it sounded and it was the best sounding bass I've ever played.
     
  14. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    If you want sustain, that's cool, but the brass nut only affects the open notes, and I'd debate if the bridge really adds it. Just my opinion.
     
  15. Not a bad offer and sadly it is worth more parted out. The pickup is worth a decent amount alone.

    The bridge in that shape ( bent) with two missing saddles isnt worth to much. Likely your best bet would be just selling the 2 saddles to someone that is missing 1 or 2 original saddles but otherwise have a functioning original bridge as if that bridge was in primo shape it would only be worth about $100.
     
  16. I wouldn't gp down badass route. I would say that majority view the bridge replacement as unnecessary and it looks unoriginal for no benefit. I can't imagine why anyone would ever need more sustain and so a brass bridge, which is very 70's, is not something I would do either.

    It's in a bit of a mess and you will probably need to remove the poly finish on the bass. Then you can get to the wood and sand it down and hopefully save the bass. Then you have a choice to repoly it, re-nitro it or leave it uncoated.

    No there's a choice.

    Davo
     
  17. My Bridge came in the other day, and is really great. I got a new set of tuners shipping out tomorrow, and I am going to set up an appointment with my luthier for a new nut in the next few days. So excited to get this baby working
     

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