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9 volt batteries

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by luisnovelo, Jul 2, 2001.


  1. Help anyone..

    for years I have wondered why 9 volt batteries are so different about their prices.. Eveready bateries cost almost half of others like Duracell bateries..

    I´ve been told that Duracells are better for active eq´s.. I always use those in my bass.. but I read somewhere that Eveready´s were the best for fx pedals... why?.. what´s the difference?
    I guess knowing would help me save some ca$h..
     
  2. Zirc

    Zirc

    May 13, 2001
    Los Angeles
    Since when did fx pedals use 9 volt? I thought they used AA or in my case a AC adapter that plugs into a socket. As for the active EQ, I haven't a clue, but I would assume any battery with high alkaline would get the job done, dunno about which one is better though (if one is, it's only prolly by a little bit)
     
  3. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    I don't know what the difference is, but alkaline batteries won't last 20 minutes in some pedals (Zoom 506 for instance).


    Always. In my experience, pedals powered with 9 volt is much more common than those powered with AA.
     
  4. CS

    CS

    Dec 11, 1999
    UK
    If the ever ready's are carbon resistor ones then some favour them for stomp boxes. To my ears some pedals benefit but the big downer is that they leak.

    IMHO use Duracells for everything. I replace my bass ones every 6 months and bung em in the tuner or distortion pedal until they run out. So I know to change my batteries at Christmas and summer (unless you live in Oz of course).

    NB I dont gig the distortion pedal.
     
  5. i'm loyal to Duracell..

    they're a little expensive, but they last a lot longer
     
  6. Marklikesbass

    Marklikesbass Guest

    Jun 26, 2001
    Houston, TX, USA
    9 volt Alkalines have more energy/last longer than carbon-zinc. The Eveready's you're refering to are probably the carbon zinc. As a general rule, if the battery or packaging does not tell you what type it is, it's carbon. "Heavy duty" batteries are more powerful versions of carbon batteries.

    I'm new to bass, and I don't know stink about slap, but in my real life I'm an electrical engineer, and I do know a few things about batteries and electricity:

    1) There's not a dime's worth of difference between alkaline batteries. Buy the cheapest ones.

    2) Voltage is Voltage. There will be NO difference in the sound of your guitar (if active p/u's) or effects by using carbon over alkaline (or vice-versa).
     
  7. Marklikesbass

    Marklikesbass Guest

    Jun 26, 2001
    Houston, TX, USA
    Turock, what batteries do you use in your Zoom that have more power than an alkaline?
     
  8. Luis Fabara

    Luis Fabara

    Aug 13, 2000
    Ecuador (South America)
    Audio Pro - Ecuador
    UHmm
    I may be talking nonsense but this is what I think:
    -Alkaline Batteries are better for Active Electronics/Pickups due to their higher A (Amperage)
    This translates into more headroom when the electronics drain more current in a moment.
    And of course last longer than any other kind. (Except Lithium)

    -Carbon batteries do sound better on Vintage FX Pedals and normal Stomp Boxes.. they use analog circuitry that was designed in a way to respond with Carbon batteries.. less headroom and other stuff. Although many of us wont hear the difference using Alkalines.

    -There are differences between brands of Alkalines
    For example, a AA Energizer is about 1500 mA while the new Duracell Ultra is around 1800mA.
    My suggestion: Buy Duracell Ultra.
     
  9. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    It's not the power. The paperwork that came with the Zoom 506 says not to use alkaline. I tried it and the battery drains really, really fast (like in 20 minutes or so).
     
  10. Marklikesbass

    Marklikesbass Guest

    Jun 26, 2001
    Houston, TX, USA
  11. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    That's good to know; however, if you are attemping to correct me... I said nothing about the 506II.
     
  12. Hategear

    Hategear Workin' hard at hardly workin'.

    Apr 6, 2001
    Appleton, Swissconsin
    I don't use active basses, but I do use a pedal and an inline tuner. I plug my pedal in, but use the battery as a backup in the event that my power source is accidentally unplugged. What I did was go to my local Radio Hack and buy two rechargeable 9-volt batteries and a charger. It seems to me that if you burn up batteries rather quickly, the rechargeables would pay for themselves in a few months.
     
  13. Newsted

    Newsted

    Jun 24, 2001
    Greece(athens)
    1) There's not a dime's worth of difference between alkaline batteries. Buy the cheapest ones.

    2) Voltage is Voltage. There will be NO difference in the sound of your guitar (if active p/u's) or effects by using carbon over alkaline (or vice-versa).
    posted from marklikebass

    i dont know what job do you do but ther is a big diferens in the battery and the voltage is not voltage look if you take a clooser look on the battery you will found somthink like code for exables for the duracell and energizer that i use is 6LR61 and some athers 6AM6ect.i dont remeber what that codes mean but i now from my bass that if i put any ather battery not alkaline or alkaline with ather code it last the half time i have use alkaline sony with ather code i dont have it right now and in 1 month was dead
     
  14. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    So there! :) :)

    Pkr2
     
  15. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    1. Voltage is voltage IMO - only difference is the milliAmperes hours they can deliver and maybe how fast they discharge when they just lay around (Lithium Ion don't discharge at all).

    I use rechargeables only (NiMH, 160mAh)

    And I invested is a good electronic recharger, helps a lot in keeping them in good health.

    I've had my share of fresh batteries going dead in the middle of a gig (bought them just an hour before!)
     
  16. The discharge rate of the battery is important and is quoted in millamp-hours or amp hours. That is the rate of discharge to take the battery voltage to some end point voltage as determined by the battery manufacturer. Volt for volt, (say) 6 off AA batts (= 9V) will last longer than 1 MM1604 (= 9V) because the mAh discharge rate is higher for the AA size.

    The idea of batts discharging when they're just lying around - properly called "shelf life" - shouldn't be a concern if batts are bought from a supplier who turns-around his stock regularly.

    I used to have some tech data books from Duracell, EverReady + others from which I was going to quote some figures. But they've gone missing!! Write to these companies, guys, and ask for a technical data book. It may help.

    Regards.

    John