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A cheap, easy, and unique method of refinishing...

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by georgestrings, Dec 15, 2005.


  1. georgestrings

    georgestrings Banned

    Nov 5, 2005
    ... I came up with this idea last summer, after using this paint on a few rifle stocks/handguards... The 1st time I used it, was on a Hamer Slammer that had been rode hard, and put away wet one too many times - it still played and sounded good, and only cost me $75, but looked pretty damn rough... at the time, I needed a 2nd bass, so I figured I could do *something* with it... Here's what I did:


    I removed the neck, hardware, and electronics - and used some 2 part epoxy to fill in the numerous dings/dents/gouges... I then used a sanding block and some 220 grit sandpaper to level off the body work, then sanded the whole thing down with 400 grit... I used a wood screw into the bottom strap post hole, and some baling wire attached to it for a hanging device, then gave the entire body several coats of Rustoleum Black Textured paint - starting with thin coats, and taking care to avoid any runs... I also masked off the neck pocket, not wanting to alter anything in that area... The pickguard was a scratched up, hideous looking MOP, so I roughed it up with 400 grit, and painted it with Krylon Ultra Flat Black, and bought new screws for it at a local hardware supply house for about $1... I put the whole thing back together, installed new strings, adjusted the neck/action/PUP height - and had myself a pretty good bass for around $85 out of pocket, plus some of my time... It turned out SO well, that I ended up trading it(and $20) for a MIM Fender P bass in decent shape - but by then, the looks of the "Assault Bass" had grown on me SO much, that I gave the MIM the same treatment - it's now known as "Assault Bass II", and I had about $115 TOTAL into it - but the PUPS were a little weak, and their color(white) didn't match... I went on ebay, and ended up picking up 2 pair of Schaller P bass PUPs for $25 shipped - they were called 2nds because the pole pieces had a little corrosion on 'em, which easily cleaned off - they sound good, and give a nice strong signal... After reading the thread on sheilding the body cavity, I decided to do this one with some aluminum tape I had kicking around - should turn out pretty nice...


    I've had alot of compliments on the looks of those 2 basses, and the paints I used are durable, wear well, and are easy to touch up, should the need arise... It's a unique look that goes on so easily, that most people think it's a factory finish - it impressed the shop owner I got the MIM from enough for him to offer me an excellent trade-in deal for the Slammer... The final look sort of makes the body appear as if it's synthetic instead of wood - and those paints can be had at any Wallyworld for under $5 per can(enough to do one instument)... So, if you've got a "beater" laying around that you want to give a unique look to, give this approach a shot - I guarantee you'll like it, and generate some interest...



    - georgestrings


    PS - I'll bet that pickup truck bedliner would work well if used this way, too....
     
  2. fookgub

    fookgub

    Jun 5, 2005
    Houston, TX
    I used that Rustoleum textured paint on a pair of (concrete) speakers a while ago, and it came out great. The stuff builds quickly, doesn't run easily, and is plenty durable. I like it. :)
     
  3. eots

    eots

    Dec 18, 2004
    Morris, IL.
    I have my project beater bass in the basement as I type, hanging up after last nights 'Rust accent ' treat ala rustoleum. Next comes the clearcoat then reassembly. I was gonna use the stone paint but I let my wife choose and well.....some things you can't take for 'granite' :rolleyes:
     
  4. georgestrings

    georgestrings Banned

    Nov 5, 2005

    Personally, I don't clearcoat mine - I prefer the look without a clearcoat, plus it makes a touchup MUCH easier, if needed... I usually just wipe it down with some Pledge occasionally - this paint is plenty tough enough on it's own...

    I eyed that Stone paint, too - I'd bet it'd turn out pretty cool...



    - georgestrings
     
  5. Cool! Now where's the pics?? :D A picture is worth a thousand words..

    Mag...
     
  6. georgestrings

    georgestrings Banned

    Nov 5, 2005


    Unfortunately, I'm without a decent digicam at the moment - but as soon as I have one available, I'll put some up... I wanted to post one during a recent TB thread about black basses - I think the reaction would've been favorable...



    - georgestrings
     
  7. eots

    eots

    Dec 18, 2004
    Morris, IL.
    ....but here goes. Hopefully the link will lead you to my collection of p basses. A fernandes w/ SD 1/4'er, gotoh bridge and D'Adarrio chrome flats. A 66' Fender Mustang. Refinished at an autobody shop by previous owner in a faux copper scheme. I got it in pieces and had the pups rewound by Lindy Fralin and had to acquires various other missing pieces to make it playable.
    And then my project p/j bass.Body is a cheap plywood but very heavy. Neck came from a SXj 75n lefty that I bought from rondo just so I could have a lefty 'geddy lee' neck to use on a project. Of course I had to flip the nut around. You might see the body in one of the pics.
    Pups are a Carvin j99 and the fernandes p pup from the sunburst fernandes p in the pics. I refinished the body w/ rustoleum decorative Accents in the 'Rust' color scheme and finished it with clearcoat. All spraycan stuff except the darker areas that were done with a sponge brush and then smeared around with a piece of plastic to get the 'leather' effect.

    http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/tdfunte/album?.dir=/6d5b
    If the link doesn't work I'll try something else.
     
  8. eots

    eots

    Dec 18, 2004
    Morris, IL.
    Some of the other things I've done to the p/j are shielding the the entire control and pup cavities w/ copper foil and star grounding. Talk about relief. I was so frustrated with the hum from the j pup that I shelfed the project for a while til I saw Lyle Caldwell's ditty. Worked like a charm. I also added a push/pull master vol. pot for series/parallel. Pull up on the 1st knob for pups in series bypasses the second vol. that's used for j volume when in parallel.
    It's a very bright sounding bass. Great for slapping and grinding out rock stuff. I usually play my Fernandes P with the tone fully CW but this one I can put in the middle for much more range one way or the other.
    * I got impatient after applying the last coat of clear. Even though the finish was dry to the touch, I reassembled the bass within the hour and got carpet impressions from my workbench. :rollno:
     
  9. fookgub

    fookgub

    Jun 5, 2005
    Houston, TX
    Looks good. I can see some orange peel on the clear, though. Is that because the basecoat is textured?

    I forgot to mention this earlier, but truck bedliner is harder to apply than you might think. I finished a pair of speakers in it once, and the results were less than stellar. If you're going for a textured finish (as opposed to the more 'solid' coverage it's intended for) you have to be very careful about how far away you hold the can. If you spray too close, the finish will bleed together and form the typical truckbed hard coating. Too far and the paint will dry before it hits the body and you'll be left with bad coverage and black dust that comes off all over the place.

    Great results can be had with this stuff, but make sure to practice on scrap first. A lot ;)
     
  10. eots

    eots

    Dec 18, 2004
    Morris, IL.
    Yes the base coat is textured. It allows the water thinned latex paint that came with the kit fill in.
    The orange peel is a result of the spray can method. It's hard to keep a wet surface with a small spray pattern. Consequently, overspray aside from the central spray pattern leaves flash. I also don't have any buffing tools but I did rub out the top only with some 0000 steel wool before laying it flat and final coating just the top, buuut, I neared the end of the can and well... spray cans are nice for convienience sake but they suck at getting a decent finish. At least the results I've had. This was kind of a quicky job. I could rub it out some by hand but I'd wait another month for it to cure a bit.

    I have an air compressor and a cup gun but it's too cold outside and it's stinking up the house as it is.
    I have refinshed parts of a 72' Gibson 345, a complete strip and finish of A 67'gibson melody maker and 78' Explorer with much better results. Taking the time to sand between coats, etc..