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A game using music theory

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Garrett Mireles, Mar 24, 2003.


  1. Um, dunno where this one goes. General Instruction (where theory is discussed) or Misc. I'll just wait for a mod to do something. :D

    Anyway, this is how it works. Someone will mention something theory-related, and someone else has to guess what it is.

    For example.

    Bob posts, "R,3,5"

    Billy replies, "Triad"

    hmm..that could be a chord too, couldn't it? Anyway, you guys understand the game?

    Someone can go ahead and start it off..
     
  2. Coypu

    Coypu Banned

    Feb 24, 2003
    Sweden
    ok here is one :

    0 11 7 8 3 1 2 10 6 5 4 9
     
  3. Bardolph

    Bardolph

    Jul 28, 2002
    Grand Rapids, MI
    F# and C
     
  4. Matthew Bryson

    Matthew Bryson Guest

    Jul 30, 2001
    of or relating to the major scale
     
  5. Chord? Wow I feel dumb :D
     
  6. Jeff Moote

    Jeff Moote Supporting Member

    Oct 11, 2001
    Beamsville, ON, Canada
    Tritone
     
  7. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    A triad is a chord. So it can't be a triad *without* being a chord. So yes, it is a chord too.
     
  8. PhatBasstard

    PhatBasstard Spector Dissector Supporting Member

    Feb 3, 2002
    Las Vegas, NV.
    Not if I play Root-stop, 3rd-stop, 5th-stop. I just played a triad, but unless all notes are sounded together how can it be a chord? Its an outline of a chord, but not a chord.

    Sorry, no hi-jacking intended. Continue.:D
     
  9. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Neither is it a triad. A triad is a chord. You have to play 'em at the same time for it to be a triad.
     
  10. PhatBasstard

    PhatBasstard Spector Dissector Supporting Member

    Feb 3, 2002
    Las Vegas, NV.
    Could be, but we could be arguing terminology. I've seen too many books, articles and examples that could justify either argument.

    One thing I've learned over the years: Not all music theory or terminology is an exact science.
     
  11. Matthew Bryson

    Matthew Bryson Guest

    Jul 30, 2001
    Don't feel dumb, my clue was probably bad or not an accurate defination. That was the clue I was giving my friend the other day when I couldn't think of the word "Diatonic"
     
  12. cassanova

    cassanova

    Sep 4, 2000
    Florida
    Originally posted by PhatBasstard


    Not if I play Root-stop, 3rd-stop, 5th-stop. I just played a triad

    Nope you played an arpeggio.

    but unless all notes are sounded together how can it be a chord? Its an outline of a chord, but not a chord.

    Thats what Ive always heard and was told. A chord is 3 or more notes strummed simultaniously. An arpeggio are the notes strummed in sucession, either in order or inverted etc.
     
  13. Emprov

    Emprov

    Mar 19, 2003
    A chord can be made up of only 2 notes, and I think that they don't need to be played in harmony. It's been a while since theory though, I may be wrong.
     
  14. Jeff Moote

    Jeff Moote Supporting Member

    Oct 11, 2001
    Beamsville, ON, Canada
    On both issues, you are wrong, and wrong you are.

    This message brought to you by the Company of Redundancy Company Inc.


    edit: to actually explain why:
    -if it is only 2 notes it is called a double-stop
    -if they are in succession you have an interval, or a set of them. These intervals can make chords/double-stops, but they must be simultaneous for that.
     
  15. Matt Till

    Matt Till

    Jun 1, 2002
    Edinboro, PA
    hasn't the chord vs. triad been done before? I think this one is left to opinion.



    I don't think your game is gonna work too well...


    Cb vs B

    (I wish there was a shrugging smiley. But then again, none of them have shoulders.)
     
  16. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Only on a stringed instrument. You don't play double stops on a piano :) (ok so piano does have strings, but it's not part of the string family). From a theory perspective (which is what we're talking about here, right?), perhaps diad would be a better word.
     
  17. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK
    i

    (OK so it's the tonic in a minor key, but WHAT minor key am I thinking of?!) ;)
     
  18. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

  19. I guess sometimes, music is just a theory.
     
  20. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Ha - that's a good one - yeah, in theory that might be regarded as music... ;)