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A pick player? OH NO!!!

Discussion in 'Ask Michael Dimin' started by BassPanther, Apr 4, 2002.


  1. Mike,
    Let me start off by saying that I'm a hard rock/metal bass player, which is partially why I prefer to play with a pick. I have nothing against finger players, slappers or tappers. It's just not my thing.
    With that out of the way, do you have any suggestions in improving not only my pick speed by improving the precision of picking? I find sometimes I have a tendancy to hit certain notes too hard or not hard enough (especially with covers) and sometimes I'm not quick enough with muting and my notes get flubbed together. I want to play hard yet very precise bass lines. Any suggestions?
     
  2. Steve Cat

    Steve Cat

    Mar 19, 2001
    I also play with a pick. I bought Michaels book and tried finger picking, but couldn't get the nuances I wanted so I play the "chord" approach with a pick and mute the A stiring with my finger. I use an ultra thin dunlop nylon pick. The nylon doesn't break like a regular say Fender type thin. It is very bright and I also grab it pretty hard and far down like with pinch harmonics. The thin pick gets the tone I want with the add benefit of not picking too hard and I can lower my action.
     
  3. Mike Dimin

    Mike Dimin

    Dec 11, 1999
    Clinician: EA, Zon, Boomerang, TI. Author "The Art of Solo Bass"
    Although I am not a pick player, I think that I can speak to the issues speed and precision.

    Both speed and precision have to do with a couple of things:

    1. Technique. Proper pick technique will facilitate speed and precision. Start with how you are holding the pick, the tightness of the grip, and the actual picking motion

    2. Touch. You you approach the strings is important. just because you play aggressive music does not mean that your touch needs to be agressive. Work to develop a tocuh that allows both speed and accuracy

    3. Practice. Develop a practice routine that constantly works on those areas. Make your practice musical. Work within the entire range of technique and touch issues to find what works best for you.

    Hope some of these ideas help.

    Steve Cat - I hope you are able to adobt my techniques for a pick. That really was the purpose of the book - to get others to make it their own

    Mike
     
  4. Steve Cat

    Steve Cat

    Mar 19, 2001
    The Pick works great for Autumn, we'll see about Misty. I have more trouble in Autumn fingering the
    Em7 in bar 30 on my Jazz (thought about getting a bass with a longer scale but I been a Fender Guy my whole life) so I transposed it down 1 1/2 steps and works alot better. (Tab works good for this I just use a black felt tip and subtract three from the numbers, duh?) Great Book, I can't wait for Book 2. I'd like to work on a transcription of A Mighty Fortress is Our God, those old German church chord changes should sound cool> Think I get the concept sufficiently to try it but don't hold your breath! Who da thunk? chord melody for Bass, on a certqain level I like it better than chord melody on guitar. Thanks for opening up a new area of bass for me. I feel like some cool old Johnny Smith jazz guy!
     
  5. Mike Dimin

    Mike Dimin

    Dec 11, 1999
    Clinician: EA, Zon, Boomerang, TI. Author "The Art of Solo Bass"
    Steve Cat,
    Thanks for the ringing endorsement. Please keep me informed of any arrangements you record, you could email them to me (real audio or mp3). I really love hearing what others are doing.

    Mike