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A problem

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by foolfighter24, Jul 18, 2001.


  1. foolfighter24

    foolfighter24 Guest

    Apr 22, 2000
    Arizona
    First, I have no idea where to post this, because there are several different things that could be going wrong.
    I think its my bass, though....

    I have a Crate 100 watt bass amp. Gets the exact sounds I like with my Squire Standard P Bass Special. The bass has been good to me and so has the amp. (I play in church with this bass through a TubeWorks 7200 and sounds great).

    But I have come across a problem. I am fairly new to playing bass(a year) and found it easier to play with a pick. I play various versions of rock(punk, power pop, etc) and I play hard. I prefer the P pickup with a little bit of the J mixed in. But with my hard playing, the P pup reacts like I am slapping on the bass. It creates this ultra punchy sound that I would like to be able to control(with EQ). This sound causes the PEAK red light to flash on the amp. That seems like a bad thing. And I'm not liking my punchy sound. I'd like to keep the lows my P pup gets but get rid of the PEAKing on my amp. That is my problem. Any help would be so greatly appriciated!

    --Some more info on my bass setup: I believe I have fairly low action, which also causes fret buzz, correct? Can I fix that myself, or is there some truss rod adjustment? And my pickup is pretty close to the string(under 1/4 inch)...can this be the problem here and would it be solved by an action adjustment?-- Thanks again.
     
  2. Cat

    Cat

    Apr 5, 2000
    Penn State
    that red light probably means that the onboard compression is limiting the signal. i think if you lower your bass volume and your preamp volume and then raise your main amp volume, this will help. i might be wrong though, this is just how it worked on my old combo.
     
  3. Slater

    Slater Bye Millen! Hello?

    Apr 17, 2000
    The Great Lakes State
    Try lowering your P-Bass pickup. (Turn the adjustment screws clockwise sending the pickup deeper into the body of the bass). This will reduce your output and should allow you to still get the tone that you like.

    Fret buzz can usually be solved with truss rod adjustments and/or bridge saddle height adustments. It depends on where your fret buzzing is occuring on the fret board. (Fret buzz can also be caused by a high fret(s). Since you say that you have low action, in your case, I would try raising your bridge saddles slightly and see if that improves your situation.

    You may just wish to take your bass to a local repair shop/music store, tell them the problems you're having, and see how much they will charge you to set up the bass for your playing style. It depends on how much patience and set up ability you have. Turning a screwdriver and an allen wrench is pretty easy. Just make your adjustments in small degrees ;) .
     
  4. foolfighter24

    foolfighter24 Guest

    Apr 22, 2000
    Arizona
    That works, but thats more of a quick fix than a real solution. But it'll have to work til I lower my pup/raise my action. Now, lowering my pup really won't hurt anything, correct?
     
  5. Cat

    Cat

    Apr 5, 2000
    Penn State
    i don't know why you think that lowering the gain wouldn't be a real solution. if the problem is that the signal is being compressed into a square wave and is distorting because the bass volume and gain are too high then it would be the main solution. much easier then adjusting pickup heights anyway.
     
  6. foolfighter24

    foolfighter24 Guest

    Apr 22, 2000
    Arizona
    That isn't the main problem, though. I'm getting the PEAK light on and a tone that is too punchy for some reason. I was thinking it was action/pup height causing these things. The PEAK light is the reaction of the amp to something that is very likely to be on the bass. Are roundwound strings the punchiest type of string? That could be a contributing factor as well. I'm seeing if these are reasons for my tone and PEAKing. Turning the gain down and the pup volume down only solves half the battle...I'm hoping for a cure-all solution. Or at least close to it.
     
  7. Slater

    Slater Bye Millen! Hello?

    Apr 17, 2000
    The Great Lakes State
    It won't hurt a thing, and if you don't like the results, you can just adjust the pup back to its' original position.

    Also, FWIW, I have a bass with a P/J pickup configuration, and I have my P-pickup adjusted down to where it's almost flush with the pickguard. I needed to adjust the P-pickup that low to get the output even with J-pickup. (This bass has active electronics, and still has a strong signal - even with the P-pup adjusted that low.)
     
  8. Cornbread

    Cornbread

    Jun 20, 2000
    Lawrence, Ma
    The obvious answer is to play with your fingers, with a light touch. You can always dig in if you want more punch. Fiddling with your EQ and string height is not a solution for bad technique.
     
  9. foolfighter24

    foolfighter24 Guest

    Apr 22, 2000
    Arizona
    If you consider how I play bad technique, that's fine. However, its the style of music I play. I play emotionally charged music and I rock out. I'm a good musician with strong stage presence. I'm not sloppy, not needlessly pounding the bass. I can play with my fingers and do so in Church and slow songs. I would just like to find a way to play my type of music, with my own style of playing it and get the tone I want. It may have to with the way I play, but nobody here knows how that is beyond my own description, which is that I play rock music with a pick a I play fairly hard. Nobody who has heard me has said my technique is bad. It just fits what type of music I play, which is a personal preference.

    EDIT-This kinda sounds like I'm angry, but I'm really not! I swear! :)
     
  10. Hategear

    Hategear Workin' hard at hardly workin'.

    Apr 6, 2001
    Appleton, Swissconsin
    How can you tell someone that if something is happening that they don't want to have happen, it's because of their playing style? This may or may not be the case, but do you think that if ________ were to complain to his tech about that fact that his amps kept clipping, or that he was getting a scraping sound while he played, or that one string was louder than the others, said tech would tell him to change the way he plays?

    To foolfighter24: You can't ask for advice from someone and then discount what they are telling you because it isn't what you wanted to hear. Try some of the things these people have suggested, even if you don't think they are going to work and see what comes out of it. ;)
     
  11. Cornbread

    Cornbread

    Jun 20, 2000
    Lawrence, Ma
    If the tech wanted to keep his job, he probably wouldn't say anything negative about his boss's technique...
    And foolfighter, maybe I shouldn't have been as "snippy", but I think that the sounds you're getting aren't necessarily due to bad gear(although you should definitely follow the suggestions about raising strings, etc.). I think the overly punchy sound you have comes from playing really hard with a pick. It doesn't matter whether you use a pick, fingers, or a screwdriver: playing really hard will get a similar effect. You don't need to play hard to get a high output (that's what amps are for).
     
  12. foolfighter24

    foolfighter24 Guest

    Apr 22, 2000
    Arizona
    If you say so...if thats your approach, thats great. But I'm in no way gonna change my technique.


    BTW, I bought an appriopriate screwdriver and I lowered my P pup and my sound is still fat and loud, but now is less punchy and there is no peaking even with the gain much higher than I would ever use it. So it wasn't the fact that I play "too hard," it was the fact that I didn't have enough room between strings and pickup. Thanks to those who were helpful....I'll be raising my action just a bit hopefully in the near future. Thanks again. :cool: