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A. Schroetter Basses

Discussion in 'Basses [DB]' started by Devils Creek, Dec 25, 2003.


  1. My local music store just got in a A. Schroetter bass, 3/4 size. The sales rep told me it was a plywood, made in the Czech republic. Hardware and workmanship was fairly good, kind of an ugly brown semi see through matt finish, but sounded pretty darn good, and loud. Aircraft cable, adjustable bridge, pretty good carving on head.

    Went home and looked for it on the net, place called Dominic's Music lists it as a hybrid, made
    in China, and priced at $1199 U.S. (My dealer wants $2025 Cdn, with shipping, exchange and duty, that's about right). I found it in several other spots listed with Chinese makers, but didn't see anything in the newbie links on threads on this product. Any members with any experience with these? Merry Xmas by the way!! :p
     
  2. Josh McNutt

    Josh McNutt Guest

    Mar 10, 2003
    Denton, Texas (UNT)
    I borrowed a 1/2 size hybrid made in Germany for a while. It was OK, but I never did get it setup, so I can't really comment on its potential. I think I read somewhere that they were made in germany but are now made in China under the same name, but I'm not sure.
     
  3. It is unfortunate that many bass brands that were made in Germany for many generations are now being produced in factories in other countries with cheap labor. For some, the quality has been maintain, but for many other they are the same in name only. There are many fine instruments being made in China now. Until they have been in use for a few years, none of these former German brands can be looked out without suspicion. As I have mentioned before, the former German made brands being made in Korea look good, but have required far too much repairing after only a year or two of playing. If you are looking at a bass made in China, you know you are getting a known product with brand names like Shen, Eastman, Christopher and a few others. It is buyer beware for many of the others.
     
  4. I played a bass I believe from the same maker this past Saturday at Williamson Music in Plano, Texas (a suburb of Dallas). I was very impressed by this instrument - a very nice gamba shape; carved hybrid construction (or so I was told); a dark, rich stain on the body; the neck didn't look too wonderful but it felt very good; and it played so nicely. I obviously couldn't tell the sound away from my playing position but it certainly sounded excellent there. It just had a very live, easy-to-play feel that just made me want more. I'll bet that with a good setup that thing would sound and play beautifully.

    Given the apparently healthy markup at places like Williamson, the $4,500 sticker didn't seem too outrageous. Based on what I've seen here on TB, I wonder if that's either an incredibly inflated price or they're selling something very different than what I've seen described here as selling for $1-2K.
     
  5. christ andronis

    christ andronis

    Nov 14, 2001
    Chicago
    I've got a 1999 3/4 Andrew Schroetter hybrid that I paid $2600.00 for. The sticker inside says it was made in Mittenwald, Germany. I've had it for a year and a half and I must say it has blossomed beautifully in that time. I'm assuming it will continue to do so. I figure that by the time it opens up more I might be able to play it. :scowl:


    peace
     
  6. matt macgown

    matt macgown Guest

    Dec 1, 2003
    Chattanooga, TN
    Just how many bass fiddle factories are there in China? Is it a rage, or are there just a small hand full, producing most of the varieties of instruments. I wonder about that. My "cheap" China bass has the look, feel and sound of an instrument that was put togehter by people who make much better instruments, ie., it neither looks, feels or sounds like it was made by a cheap shop. The neck and scroll are as standard as Englehardts, well carved, neck a little thick but very playable - What can you tell me about this - anyone? Cheap factories and good factories???

    I am curious about the tone - with a bow, it's harsh, almost bitter up close, but I had one of my offspring bow it for me the other day, and from several feet out, it's big, fat, booming bass. But I've played an old european fully carved bass, years ago, with about the same sound (both 7/8).
     
  7. Wyzird05

    Wyzird05

    Dec 1, 2003
    South Bend, IN
    I know the bass I own is from a smaller factory because we can only get 6 a year in at work. The same factory also makes violins, violas, and cellos. The luthier we order them through says the shop is owned by a friend of his in Shanghai, China. So I doubt there are many shops like the giant ones in Romania, but I am sure they are not all small.
     
  8. Josh McNutt

    Josh McNutt Guest

    Mar 10, 2003
    Denton, Texas (UNT)
    Hmmm... Yours is an Andrew Schroetter, but the one I borrowed for a while was an Anton Schroetter. Anyone know anything about that?
     
  9. matt macgown

    matt macgown Guest

    Dec 1, 2003
    Chattanooga, TN
    I rather estimate that a lot are made as kits, since the fellow who sold me mine said he can order kits for me, just tell him how many. That would imply a fairly larger operation. And one web site shows a pretty large Chinese factory building - a reputable dealer. My next guestimate is that a lot of these kits are sold in both Europe and America, assembled in those places, and labelled as made in "..." Then there must be the small shops that handcraft their instruments, ie., six a year, would be no more than two people.

    So "made in - - -" seems to me almost meaningless now, unless a person has first hand knowldege of same?

    I am curious, because I may order a couple or three kits for small basses, student size, to assemble and finish (without that ultra shiny gloss finish, ere, maybe to rent to young students for the year or two that they need them - say 5th and sixth graders. Though renting is a nemesis allin itself, too. The resulting bass would be a "no - name," or whatever I wish to label it. Or maybe just for my grand kids.
     
  10. I've never heard of a bass"kit"?????????
    I've had several Anton Schroetter basses. They were all carved and not bad. This was in the mid 80's.
    One was a FULL sizer with a 44" string length but the sound matched the size. Real BIG and fat sound with gobs of darkness!
     
  11. matt macgown

    matt macgown Guest

    Dec 1, 2003
    Chattanooga, TN
    Well, that brings up some more questions. First, it appears (and I don't yet have first hand knowledge, but plan to get it), that there are basses (and other string instruments) made in the white but not assembled. This is what I gleaned from speaking with the fellow who sold me mine. The basses can be imported, assembled and finished without a label. We called them"kits," in our communications. I don't want to get him into any hot water, but that is the way the conversations went.

    Would I be talking out of church here, or do others have this info too? It certainly helps nme to explain why so many of the cheap basses are look alikes.

    Next - my Chinese bass is a 4/4, but there seemed to be some agreement that it was really 7/8. 46" from top of front to bottom, 21" across top bout, 27" across bottom, 44 " nut to bridge, which I adjusted to 43." So the company seems to be right in their advertising... and bass size isn't all that standardized anyway? That's a small pickey point though, I like the size, and that's the real point.

    I want to know more about all this.
     
  12. Matt, I was aware that you could purchase any instrument in the "White". I just kinda got the impression that you were talking about a kit in terms of "you put it together" kinda thing.
     
  13. matt macgown

    matt macgown Guest

    Dec 1, 2003
    Chattanooga, TN
    Well - yep, that's sorta what I infered from my conversations (on - line) with this fellow. I got the concept from my brother really, who at one time built and sold kit airplanes - "Kitfoxes." So I asked the guy in CA.: "Yep, how many kits do you want?" And that's where that came from. I am beginning to think that most of the construction is done in China, though - and maybe Europe.

    Quinn violin - if I recall- sells all the materials to make violins and basses, precuts, and front woods that you shape yourself. They are also expensive. But they are not the "kit" form that I had in mind.

    I think a kit concept would be lots of fun those those of us who aren't lootiers, but would like an intro to the field, get the feel of what it's like., and have something to show for it afterwards.

    So if you can't actually go out and buy a real kit now, as I have visualized it, (or buy it on line) I think it would be a great idea, and have at least a limited number of enthusiasts, including me.

    I am going to pursue the idea further, and see if I understood my saleman correctly. He is really a great guy to do business with, and I plan to do more business with him and his company.
     
  14. FidgetStone

    FidgetStone

    Jun 30, 2002
    Allen, TX
    Josh,
    I think that the Anton Schroetter is a private label name for Czech-made Strunal basses that Brook Mays Music sells.

    I am not 100% positive about the "Anton Schroetter" name but I am positive that Brook Mays sells Strunals under German sounding names like that. I did a ton of research and came close to buying one. Also, I was in their Dallas store on LBJ when there were several them still in the Strunal boxes before being unpacked.

    Selling stringed instruments under different, impressive European sounding names is a common age old practice that started way before any of us was ever born.

    I really liked the Strunal but ended up buying a Christopher from a real luthier because it was the same $$ and the luither (David Graham in Arlington, TX) is a super guy that knows his stuff.

    Numerous TB'ers have Strunals and love them.
     
  15. According to the Ehrhardt violin identification books (published in the 1960's), Anton Schroetter was making instrument in Mittenwald, Germany long before Brook Mays started selling basses. They were sold in the US by A. Schroetter Co. New York, NY.
     
  16. FidgetStone

    FidgetStone

    Jun 30, 2002
    Allen, TX
    Josh & Bob,
    I stand corrected on the lable name at Brook Mays. Some of their Strunals are labled "Wenzel Anton" or "W. Anton".

    Sorry about the name mix up. The only "Anton" I'm familiar with is the one that plays drums on David Letterman.

    http://www.brookmays.com/department.asp?prodcode=b3d1
     
  17. I had a solid top ply back Andrew Schroetter bass. it read made in Mittenwald. it was a identical to the Czech made 5/35 Strunal. so I gather that it was really a strunal. false marketing? a lie? I sold it.
     
  18. From what I've managed to cull out of old books, brochures and the internet, the original Schroetter Mittenwald company produced instruments with only the first name of Anton. However, I did find reference to some violins labeled as "Approved by Andreas Schroetter" dating back to about 1960-1970. It appears that the Schroetter name was sold to Paesold sometime after about 1990 and that the original Schroetter company is no longer in business. Paesold shows the Schroetter instruments as being made in China. I have not been able to find a connection between Paesold and Strunal, but since Paesold is a small part of a large conglomerate, anything is possible.
     
  19. christ andronis

    christ andronis

    Nov 14, 2001
    Chicago
    How did it sound? Was it a decent bass? Like I said before, I'm enjoying mine...

    Bob, thanks for the research. This place is the best!!!


    peace
     
  20. Josh McNutt

    Josh McNutt Guest

    Mar 10, 2003
    Denton, Texas (UNT)
    That's what I thought. I think there was some discussion over this maker a while back, but I'm not sure. The one I had was a 1976 Anton Schroetter hybrid 1/2 size. I borrowed it from a school and someone had put a 3/4 bridge on it, so I played with helicores at around 13-15 mm action until I could get my Christopher. It was a BAD situation, but it was an okay bass (as far as I could judge then). I remembered a minute ago that the guy from whom I bought my Christopher (David Sloan) has a Schroetter carved bass at his shop, but I never did get a chance to play it. I think it's his main bass.