1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  

A tone that cannot be overlooked...

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by two fingers, Oct 7, 2009.


  1. two fingers

    two fingers Opinionated blowhard. But not mad about it. Gold Supporting Member

    Feb 7, 2005
    Eastern NC USA
    So There are 3 things I have never really gotten into...
    1) P basses
    2) flat wound strings
    3) playing with a pick

    However, a friend of mine and I have been watching some concerts I DVR'd recently. One was The Prince's Trust concert from a few years back, a Hall and Oats show at a small club in LA (Sunday night concerts on HDNet), a few 90's bands concerts, etc. I wasn't into some of the music but one thing really got my attention. Hall and Oats bassist, and several of the bassists from the other concerts were playing P basses with flats and using a pick. We were watching on my big flat screen in HD and it was running through my stereo. The bass tones these guys were getting were AMAZING! They were playing funk, soul, pop, rock, you name it! I'm converted. I've already put flats (Chromes for now and we'll see later) on my MIJ Jazz and I'm thinking about putting them on my Roscoe Beck 5. And I'm working with a few different picks to see which ones I can work use. I won't be totally doing away with rounds and my finger style (good thing I have half a dozen basses), but I'm adding this to my tone bank ASAP! After 23 years of overlooking picks, P basses, and flats, I'm on board! (Now to find a P bass :bag:) To the bat cave Robin!

    My point is, it's never too late to open your eyes (and EARS) to a different way of doing things.

    Cheers,
    Two Fingers...........................and a PICK
     
  2. HogieWan

    HogieWan

    Feb 4, 2008
    Lafayette, LA
    flats sound like they are too dull when playing alone, but in a band setting, they really stand out by giving the other instrument room. By not having a lot of high-mids, you don't seem to overwhelm the guitars and you can be a little hotter in the mix and that lets you really stand out without standing on toes.
     
  3. two fingers

    two fingers Opinionated blowhard. But not mad about it. Gold Supporting Member

    Feb 7, 2005
    Eastern NC USA
    That's exactly what I heard. In a band setting, the "dull" turned into punch and clarity. Go figure!
     
  4. HogieWan

    HogieWan

    Feb 4, 2008
    Lafayette, LA
    remember that next time your guitarist is excited about his new tone that has lots of low-mids. He will cover your tone and make both of you get lost in the mix
     
  5. two fingers

    two fingers Opinionated blowhard. But not mad about it. Gold Supporting Member

    Feb 7, 2005
    Eastern NC USA
    I do mostly fill-in stuff so I have to work with whatever guitarist is there. Most are not stupid in my area though. One guy I play with, I actually have to ask him to turn up some!
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.