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A WWII POW novel with a difference - I know the author

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by Marlat, Apr 26, 2010.


  1. Marlat

    Marlat

    Sep 17, 2002
    London UK
    Sorry that this is a little bit SPAM like, but I thought it was worth causing a mild SPAM induced inconvenience.

    I found out today by accident that a colleague of mine (we work in the same team of 31 lawyers) has written a book about his father's experiences as a POW during WWII. We knew his father, who passed away last year, was a POW held by the Japanese for 3 years, but we had no idea he was writing a book about it. He hasn't shared it with the department generally, but I spoke with him about it today and he was happy for me to plug it on TB.

    The book is called The Prisoner List (Amazon.com link) and its about his fathers 3 years in captivity under the Japanese after the fall of Singapore. Below is the review on Amazon that describes it better than I could:

    Anyway, its self published and so if you think you might enjoy it please order it and tell people if you like it. Richard wrote it because he thinks its important that people today and in the future know what the older generation went through in wars. I also think this is a very important goal and that the past, particularly with respect to the terrible things humans have to to other humans should not be forgotten. I have ordered the book, I haven't read it yet, but seeing as it is a subject that interest me greatly, I thought I would bring it to TB's attention in the hope that others may find it an interesting read.

    Thanks for indulging.

    Mark
     
  2. It looks like a good book.

    I'm surprised anyone made it out alive.
     
  3. drteeth

    drteeth

    Apr 1, 2008
    Leuven, Belgium
    Looks like an interesting read, I'll put it on my to-read list! :)
     
  4. CElton

    CElton I'm a new note finder...

    Very interesting. Thanks for posting. I will definitely order this one.
     
  5. Valerus

    Valerus

    Aug 4, 2005
    Austin, Texas
    Sounds like a powerful account.
     
  6. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Apr 12, 2001
    Olympia, WA
    So the difference only matters to you, I don't know the guy.

    -Mike
     
  7. Marlat

    Marlat

    Sep 17, 2002
    London UK
    I can introduce you to him if it will help.
     
  8. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Apr 12, 2001
    Olympia, WA
    That would be cool, yes please.

    -Mike
     
  9. Relic

    Relic Cow are you?

    Sep 12, 2006
    Robbinsville, NJ
    Very cool, thanks for posting this! I'll certainly be ordering one
     
  10. RWP

    RWP

    Jul 1, 2006
    I can not image what that must have been like. The Japanese were not kind to prisoners.
     
  11. MatticusMania

    MatticusMania LANA! HE REMEMBERS ME!

    Sep 10, 2008
    Pomona, SoCal
    Niether were the cambodians, according to Rambo.
     
  12. Nor I, & they weren't.

    Whilst we're on the subject, here's a facsimile article from the July 1946 issue of the Great Western Railway Magazine
    (Note: Some of the terms used may cause offence today):

    RailwayOfDeathA.

    Photobucket appears to have "done something" to it, if you can't read the above, attached is a pdf version.

    Pete
     

    Attached Files:

  13. CElton

    CElton I'm a new note finder...

    Regarding this subject, also check out "Flyboys" by James Bradley. Very chilling account of how POW's were treated on the island of Chichi. I couldn't put it down.
     
  14. Marlat

    Marlat

    Sep 17, 2002
    London UK
    I will have to check it out. There is a chapter in Max Hasting's Armageddon which is pretty chilling on the same subject.
     
  15. BassyBill

    BassyBill The smooth moderator... Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 12, 2005
    West Midlands UK
    Conditions for POWs have been truly atrocious in lots of wars, and that has often been the case regardless of which side they happened to be on. This account of conditions for POWs in the American Civil War is harrowing reading.

    http://www.ihr.org/jhr/v02/v02p137_Weber.html

    Mark, your colleague's book looks fascinating and I will definitely check it out.
     
  16. RHFusillo

    RHFusillo Supporting Member

    Mar 20, 2000
    Phoenix, AZ
    Thanks, Mark. This looks like something I want to check out. I have visited the Changi POW Museum in Singapore, and the stories I heard there were horrendous enough.
     
  17. Marlat

    Marlat

    Sep 17, 2002
    London UK
    Thanks, I have shown the thread to RIchard and he is very happy with the postive comments. I think he did this more for his dad and himself than to sell a load of books. However, if anyone knows any good military history discussion sites that I could pass on to him that would be a big help.
     
  18. Marlat

    Marlat

    Sep 17, 2002
    London UK
    Just a quick update and something for those of you who are not "readers" :D

    Richard was contacted by some film students who wanted to turn his book into a short film as part of their studies. The film is now completed and can be viewed on Richard's website. Its fairly short, about 18 minutes and gives a good short account of the sort of hardships that these men went through.

    The films can be seen here: http://www.theprisonerlist.com/the-film.html

    Its not an "adult" film, but because it deals with POWs it does contain some scenes which young children may find disturbing. I've watched it and its very well made (I was genuinely surprised at how good it is for a student film). I'd recommend spending the 18 mins or so to watch it - its free!
     
  19. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Apr 12, 2001
    Olympia, WA
    YES!!!! I'm all over it. Thank you Mark.

    -Mike
     
  20. Marlat

    Marlat

    Sep 17, 2002
    London UK
    Cool let me know what you think!
     

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