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Acoustic-electric for rock gigs?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by bass_drum, Aug 31, 2005.


  1. bass_drum

    bass_drum

    Feb 13, 2005
    Alberta,Canada
    Hey!

    I'm seriosuly considering getting a tacoma thunderchief 5. But I'm wondering if I should because I'm in a heavy rock group. Would I get bad looks for playing one?
    Also, I've heard acoustic-electric basses sound the same as electric basses when plugged in, is that true?
    Does anyone have ny clips of the tacoma thunderchief?
    Who can describe the thunderchiefs tonef or me?

    Thanks!
    ~JB~
     
  2. if your band is even a little loud, you may find yourself facing sever feedback problems with an acoustic-electric bass (or finding yourself unable to hear if you turn down to avoid the feedback). That's the main danger I think...

    Also, tonally, they are approximately to electric basses what acoustic guitars are to electric guitars. I'm sure you can tweak them to be somewhat alike, but you'll finding yourself lowering the action and playing with a lighter touch, meaning you have to turn up, leading to more feedback problems...
     
  3. bass_drum

    bass_drum

    Feb 13, 2005
    Alberta,Canada
    hmm... do thunderchiefs feedback a lot?

    ...I would be using some overdrive...maby this isnt the right choice. Altho I do tend to stay away form my amp (its a 2x15 rig so i stay atleast 8 feet away) there will always be the odd situation where id have to stand close. Are there any ways to prevent feedback?
     
  4. Don't play a Thunderchief 5 through a 2x15 in a loud rock band. A good friend of mine has one, & won't use it for accompanying piano in Church(8:00am service, mostly hymns & quiet contemporary stuff)for feedback issues. Read up on ABGs in general; most reviewers are searching for more volume before feedback, which is for the most part, impossible w/an ABG. I just got a used Washburn AB-20, however, & it's VERY resistant to feedback. There are other ABGs that can get loud, but judging from my friend's experience, I wouldn't reccommend the T-Chief for your gig. They play sweetly, just don't get too loud.
     
  5. bass_drum

    bass_drum

    Feb 13, 2005
    Alberta,Canada
    hmm...doesnt that polarity switch help though?
     
  6. bass_drum

    bass_drum

    Feb 13, 2005
    Alberta,Canada
    I did a quick search on "abg feedback" and came up with a thread talking about the Feedback Buster any info on that? would that work?
     
  7. Ian Perge

    Ian Perge Supporting Member

    May 11, 2001
    Evansville, Indiana
    I can't imagine using a "true" ABG on any stage louder than a coffeehouse-type gig with minimal amplification (acoustic-specific amps for g*itars, small combos for bass) - the backline, PA, and monitors of a club stage are just *asking* for feedback hell by throwing tons of sound at an instrument that'll internally amply everything that reaches the soundhole.

    If you're looking to use it onstage, I'd consider a semi-acoustic bass such as the Godin A-series. You'll still get a good deal of the "acousticness" of an ABG while reducing much of the feedback ampflication issues.
     
  8. SmittyG

    SmittyG

    Dec 24, 2003
    Texarkana, Texas
    I'm just curious, and not that you have to justify yourself in any way, what makes you so interested in doing this in the first place? From your questions, it seems you don't have much in the way of experience with acoustic bass guitars. Again, that's not a requirement or anything, I'm just wondering what has you so excited about using one in this context.

    To give you some useful info since I pestered you with my questions, I don't think you will be satisfied with the frequency response. I have never played the specific bass you asked about, but I have played several models of acoustic basses. They do not have the low end that a solid-bodied bass has. Plus, they tend to accentuate the upper mids a bit. Now this sound is quite cool in the right context, you do have a lot of flexibility in the tone controls, and I love playing mine (a no name cheapie, but fun to play and sounds nice). However, for a hard rock band, I just think you would sacrifice too much punch and depth.

    I would strongly recommend trying one out with your band at a practice, even if it isn't that particular make and model, just so you can hear if the idea merits further investigation.

    Hope that helps.
     
  9. bass_drum

    bass_drum

    Feb 13, 2005
    Alberta,Canada
    Well the main reason I want one is because I played one in my uncles store, and It was really boomy. I absolutely loved the sound that came out of it. But it was a 4 string and I want a 5 string, and it wasnt very loud acoustically.

    So then I found the Tacoma Thunderchief, that would be loud enough to jam with guitarists acousticaly! Now that really got my attention becuase sometimes I just jam with one or 2 guitarists to write music, and this would be really helpful. Plus I could sit around the house and play it wherever I went.

    Then theres the whole ability to busk :p .

    But then I looked at the price of one of those thunderchiefs. And I cant justify paying that much for a bass, if I cant gig with it. So thats where I am now.
     
  10. SmittyG

    SmittyG

    Dec 24, 2003
    Texarkana, Texas
    Cool. OK, then I would recommend that you will have to be able to get one (of that specific model) for yourself to try out instead of relying on the opinions of others. You have so much you wish this bass to do for you (it's good you have it that well defined) and you have to be able to justify the expense (it's very good you think in those terms) to take the gamble based on other folks' very subjective opinions.
     
  11. bass_drum

    bass_drum

    Feb 13, 2005
    Alberta,Canada
    Yes thats true. Unfortuanately the only acoustic absses I've seen here, have been 1 washburn, 1 takamine and 1 jay turser. So I cant try one out, and I cant try one of those otu becuase they are completely different beasts compared to the thunderchief (the body size, acoustic volume, woods used, price, etc.) . Maby I can find someone who uses them and borrow it or sumthing. Hmm...

    Also, I went on micheal kellys website a little while ago, and why is it that so many artists are using the dragonfly? Does it feedback alot less when the top is laminated?

    Oh and one more thing, It seems like feedback happens because of the sound projecting back at the abg and then the sound entering the bass, right? Well what if I covered the soundhole with something, just liek oen of those "Feedback Busters"?
     
  12. Yes, less resonant acoustics suffer less from feedback - I have a Washburn doubleneck acoustic guitar which is wonderful for stage use, because the top is thick and laminated. However, its acoustic resonance is nowhere near my other acoustics.
     
  13. bass_drum

    bass_drum

    Feb 13, 2005
    Alberta,Canada
    Has anyone had any experience with the Feedback Buster???
     
  14. bass_drum

    bass_drum

    Feb 13, 2005
    Alberta,Canada
    What if...

    I had the thunderchief, I was 8 feet away from my amp, I was nto facing my amp, I had a notch filter and a polarity switch, I had a thick piece of rubber in the soundhole, and I had foam on the underside of the top. That is the ultimate best case scenario that I could get while playing an acoustic...how would that work? :p

    I know I seem persistant, but there has to be a way to do this. I would really liek an acoustic thats as loud as an acoustic guitar but I cant justify payign so much money without being able to gig with it! And lots of people swear by the feedback buster...
     
  15. Don't the Thunderchiefs have that funky-shaped soundhole? I don't know if they make feedback busters in non-round shapes.

    If you are really determined to use an acoustic bass guitar, it can be done, but it seems like an awful lot of trouble to do it. The two uses you have in mind are kind of mutually exclusive, since any instrument resonant enough is likely to have feedback problems, and any that aren't are not going to be loud enough to play just acoustically. The feedback buster will help a little, but ultimately you still have the resonant top. The foam may help a little, but putting it in for gigs and taking it out for playing acoustically? Through the soundhole? I don't know about you, but I'd get fed up of that real quick.

    Ultimately it sounds like you've kind of made your mind up... if you're really want to try this, why not try and get hold of a feedback buster, then try it out at a shop with a cranked amp, as in gig-level cranked? Then you'll have some kind of idea whether it will work.
     
  16. bass_drum

    bass_drum

    Feb 13, 2005
    Alberta,Canada
    Ya, its inevetable.

    I gues this wont work, and I'll have to accept that. Although, one day, I will make abunch of acoustic songs, and when I do, that nice beutiful bass will be hanging there on the wall of a music store, waiting for me to buy it. lol. Thanks for all the help guys!
     
  17. Blackbird

    Blackbird Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2000
    California
    Bad idea.

    Look into the Godin A4 and A5 models, as well as the Rob Allen basses. Those are your best bet.
     
  18. bass_drum

    bass_drum

    Feb 13, 2005
    Alberta,Canada
    I've been told the godin A series arent to loud, and I'd like one thats atleast loud enough to compete with an acoustic guitar, or atleast be heard abit.
     
  19. Blackbird

    Blackbird Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2000
    California
    Well, the idea is to plug into an amp. I thought you were playing in a Rock group.
     
  20. bass_drum

    bass_drum

    Feb 13, 2005
    Alberta,Canada
    I've been told the godin A series arent to loud, and I'd like one thats atleast loud enough to compete with an acoustic guitar, or atleast be heard abit.