Dismiss Notice

Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

Add 9 (using the 3rd)

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by CrawlingEye, Mar 10, 2002.


  1. CrawlingEye

    CrawlingEye Member

    Mar 20, 2001
    Easton, Pennsylvania
    How do you play it with the 3rd?

    I can do it, but it's an insane stretch getting the 3rd and 9th both. Even when playing up higher.

    By the way, I'm talking about playing chords, not just basic playing.
     
  2. Oysterman

    Oysterman

    Mar 30, 2000
    Sweden
    He speaks in TAB, but writes a G9, not a G(add9). :D

    How about:
    Code:
    G -14- (9)      G -14- (9)
    D ----          D ----
    A -14- (3)      A -13- (b3)
    E -15- (R)  or  E -15- (R)
    
    G(add9)         Gm(add9)
    
     
  3. I didn't understand that either, but the way I play it is: R, 5th, 9th, 3rd with the respective fingering: 1, 3, 4, 2. That's for a maj 9. For a min 9 I usually bar the 1st finger over 4 strings and use my 2nd finger (middle finger) for the 5th and 4th finger (pinky for the 9)

    as an example for an E maj9(no 7th):

    G ---13---
    D ---16---
    A ---14---
    E ---12---

    with fingering
    ---2---
    ---4---
    ---3---
    ---1---

    E min9(no 7th) is this:

    G ---12---
    D ---16---
    A ---14---
    E ---12---

    with fingering
    ---1---
    ---4---
    ---2---
    ---1---

    I believe this is what you were asking about. I also have big hands too so I don't know if those with smaller hands can do this as comfortably, but I'm sure there are other ways that people do it. Either way, the 9 chord is one of my favorite chords and I find myself adding it a lot lately.
     
  4. CrawlingEye

    CrawlingEye Member

    Mar 20, 2001
    Easton, Pennsylvania
    Wow, that's a lot easier.

    I was making the huge stretch before. :)
     
  5. Brad Barker

    Brad Barker Supporting Member

    Apr 13, 2001
    berkeley, ca
    then there's always C(add9), as heard on pearl jam's "elderly woman...small town."

    E: 3 (G)*
    B: 3 (D)
    G: 0 (G)
    D: 2 (E)
    A: 3 (C)
    E: X


    *this can also be open, thus making this voice in the chord E. still C(add9), just a subtle difference in sound.
     
  6. Wxp4759cb

    Wxp4759cb

    Nov 23, 2000
    Kansas City, MO
    What is the difference between G9, and G(add9)?
    Thanks,
     
  7. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    G9 means G B D F A

    G(add 9) is G B D A

    if there is a straight number (e.g. G9, G11, G13) it implies all the extensions, if not it just means the extensions in the "add" part....
     
  8. Many thanks to Chris Braddock for asking my question for me, and to Pacman for answering it. :)
     
  9. Aaron

    Aaron

    Jun 2, 2001
    Bellingham, WA
    That's a pain in the ass to play on a fretless, and near impossible for DB.
     
  10. And an AMEN to that!
     
  11. CrawlingEye

    CrawlingEye Member

    Mar 20, 2001
    Easton, Pennsylvania
    Well, since I'm doing chords, I think it'd be a lot easier to just do it with strings next to each other.
    :)

    Thanks for the suggestions, but I think I'm just still going to be stuck doing the long stretch. :(
     
  12. Well, only you know what you want to project in the music you're playing, but I would still suggest experimenting with a few different voicings. Especially things like 3rds, with the 3rd an octave higher. It tends to sound better because thirds a string apart usually reach that low interval limit and don't get the effect you're probably looking for. However, fifths I would play a string apart (a.k.a. power chords!!! :cool: ). But it's all up to each person and their physical limitations, or whether chords are even in good taste for the music they're playing.
     
  13. CrawlingEye

    CrawlingEye Member

    Mar 20, 2001
    Easton, Pennsylvania
    Yeah, I know. I just find it too much of a pain to really utilize in a song, when jumping over a string for chords. It usually takes me too long to get to the one note.
     
  14. Oysterman

    Oysterman

    Mar 30, 2000
    Sweden
    I solve the string skipping problem when playing chords by either:

    a) muting the string that should be silent,

    b) incorporating my right hand thumb.
     
  15. Intrepid

    Intrepid

    Oct 15, 2001
    Don't confuse him....you don't have to play a 7th in a G9 chord so basially they are one in the same...hell I hate 7ths...I only like lowered 7ths
     
  16. But it does not work the other way round, so you can't have a lowerd 7 in an add9 chord.

    By the way, don't kill me if I'm wrong.
     
  17. I'd kill yah... but your right.:p

    In any situation where your playing a chord that's uncomfortable, you can always take a look at notes that don't add a whole lot to the color and distinction of a chord. For instance-- the fifth note in a chord typically doesn't add a whole lot of color (unless your playing hard rock/ heavy metal) and can be eliminated without changing the overall characteristic of the chord a whole lot. Another note that can usually get tossed is the root note because someone else in the band is probably already covering it. The bottom line is you want your part to sound smooth so if your having troubles fingering a chord, try to focus on the important notes and leave the rest behind.;)
     
  18. Intrepid

    Intrepid

    Oct 15, 2001
    Well if you're talking about like a one stroke chord then yeah, but you can play a lowered 7th after you play the chord. Myxolodian...I think you meant a regular 7th though, which in case you're still right, but you can play the 7th after you stroke the chord.