Adding A Battery Compartment?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Bryan R. Tyler, Jan 13, 2004.

  1. Bryan R. Tyler

    Bryan R. Tyler TalkBass: Usurping My Practice Time Since 2002 Staff Member Administrator Gold Supporting Member

    May 3, 2002
    I have a bass that has no separate battery compartment, and I was wondering if any of the luthiers here have ever added one to a bass after it's been constructed, and how much you would estimate the charge would be for such a thing. Thanks!
  2. mikgag

    mikgag Guest

    Mar 25, 2002
    Shouldn't be much. I can do it in 15 minutes. Call you local luthier type guy.
  3. JP Basses

    JP Basses

    Mar 22, 2002
    Paris FRANCE
    this won't cost you much but be aware that plastic battery box sux :D

    They often break and also 2 batteries ot of 3 do not fit correctly so the box won't close as they should.

    This is my experience.

    I prefer to have the battery under the control cavity cover and ALWAYS offer an active/passive switch in case the battery dies.

    Peace, JP
  4. Bass Kahuna

    Bass Kahuna

    Dec 3, 2002
    West Lafayette, Indiana
    Luthier, Custom Builder
    Yes, I've done it and it is easy and quick to do.

    The only thing to watch for is where you place it, so you don't end up routing into any of the cavities (pickups, etc.) on the front or the mounting screws for the bridge, etc., depending on how long they are.

  5. Skerik1


    Sep 21, 2002
    Saint Paul, MN
    You only should need to change your battery like once every six months or so. You gotta be pretty dang lazy to not want to take the control cover off....

    Plus they just look bad. Just keep your bass unplugged when you're not using it.

  6. tplyons


    Apr 6, 2003
    Madison, NJ
    I'm actually a huge fan of battery boxes, especially the kind Ernie Ball uses. My Duracell PROCELL's have no problem and fit perfectly, every time. They're inobtrusive, especially on dark colored basses, and honestly, I'd put one on my Precision if I wasn't about to convert it to passive electronics.

    Nothing you can't do without a router, a drill and a chunk of practice wood.
  7. mslatter


    Apr 8, 2003
    Also trace the wires to the pickup(s) and bridge and make sure you're not going to route through them.
  8. tplyons


    Apr 6, 2003
    Madison, NJ
    I would never perform surgery of this magnitude on a bass without removing all electronics and hardware. Flatter, more secure surface, less chance for error.
  9. Trevorus


    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    I actually had to do this to a gibson explorer guitar once. The bodies on those are thin. I happened to have a deep battery box. I had to do some modifications. I would rough it out with a dremel router, then I would go old fashioned. Hand chisels. I find I have a lot more control with a good, sharp chisel set. Always use the shallow battery boxes like carvin sells, and you won't have a problem.