1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  
     
    TalkBass.com has been uniting the low end since 1998.  Join us! :)

Adding sockets for detachable casters-- any potential problems?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Captain Awesome, Dec 13, 2002.


  1. Captain Awesome

    Captain Awesome

    Apr 2, 2001
    PDX
    Recently I've been having to carry my Avatar 2x10 cab long distances a lot and I figure it would be more fun if I had casters. I want to be able to take the wheels off when I don't want them so I'm thinking in terms of going to the hardware store and getting some sockets to put in. The cab is made of 3/4" plywood and is lined with fiberglass on the inside. Are there any potential problems to watch out for with air leaks and such?
     
  2. Eric Moesle

    Eric Moesle

    Sep 21, 2001
    Columbus OH
    Be sure to get something with sockets that aren't open when the casters are removed. Take a look at the Ernie Ball pop out casters set available online or probably at your local music store. They have a solid, enclosed socket so that you aren't leaving open air holes in your cab.
     
  3. Captain Awesome

    Captain Awesome

    Apr 2, 2001
    PDX
    So I assume anything that uses an enclosed socket should be fine?
     
  4. FretNoMore

    FretNoMore * Cooking with GAS *

    Jan 25, 2002
    The frozen north
    If possible try to find casters that are bigger in diameter, 2 inches is a bit too small on rough surfaces IMHO. I use 4 inch casters on the PA gear, and 3 inches for my bass rig. Much easier to roll around.

    I also prefer to make a dolly from a piece of plywood and the casters. I strap the cabinets or racks onto the dollies, small holes or indentations for the speaker feet stops them from sliding on the dolly. It's a bit more expensive but I prefer to keep my racks and cabs intact, without any holes or screws.
     
  5. Captain Awesome

    Captain Awesome

    Apr 2, 2001
    PDX
    But that's solely because you like to keep your cabs intact, right?
     
  6. FretNoMore

    FretNoMore * Cooking with GAS *

    Jan 25, 2002
    The frozen north
    Mostly to not have mount them directly in my cabinets (wheels put a strain on whatever they are attached to, and the wood can splinter if the wheels catch hard on something), but also because the dollies can be used to transport other gear, and because I couldn't find removable casters with that big wheel diameters.
     
  7. Captain Awesome

    Captain Awesome

    Apr 2, 2001
    PDX
    OK, I didn't think of that issue. Has anyone actually ruined their cabs that way though?
     
  8. FretNoMore

    FretNoMore * Cooking with GAS *

    Jan 25, 2002
    The frozen north
    I have not personally done it, but I've seen a guy we share rehearsal space with have to repair a PA sub. One caster caught in a pot hole when wheeling the heavy cab in from a parking lot and that ripped the screws out with a piece of wood. I'd rather repair a dolly than a cab. But I guess it's down to how much transporting you do, just thinking about this risk probably eliminates it most of the time, just go carefully over rougher surfaces.
     
  9. Nick man

    Nick man

    Apr 7, 2002
    Tampa Bay
    I had huge wheels on the side of my home made bass cab.

    It actually got dommaged from leaning it on its wheels to roll it around. The weight of the cab being concentrated on those two spots where the wheels were actually caused the wood there to come apart and splinter.

    Of course this is a huge cab built for 2-15" speakers, so you might not have the same problem with your 2-10, Im just telling you what could happen with a much larger cab.

    Peace
    Nick
     
  10. rumblethump

    rumblethump Supporting Member

    Mar 25, 2000
    Pioneer CA. 95666
    I prefer the permanent mount casters (on my 1-15). You can always stand your cab on its side if you want solid contact with the stage. I've had many pop out casters that worked loose and eventually fell out every time I picked up the cab. A real pain. Also a 2-10 on casters is going to be very short and ergonomically ackward to roll around. YMMV
     
  11. BillyB_from_LZ

    BillyB_from_LZ Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2000
    Chicago
    I second the dolly approach...besides, they're very useful for other task around the house too.

    I have one of those that I made in the early 80s...still going strong. I recently bought a folding hand truck at The Home Depot that works well too. Folds into a 20 by 15 by 3 in rectangle for transport...works great. My local Sam Ash store sells nearly the same thing for twice as much...
     
  12. rockindoc

    rockindoc Daily Lama

    Jan 26, 2002
    Bonham, Tx
    Carvin makes a nice dolly board, 16" x 24", "non-skid" Duratuff-covered, with 3 1/2" casters. They're $30 plus S/H. I use them for PA speakers and my bass cabs.
     
  13. Captain Awesome

    Captain Awesome

    Apr 2, 2001
    PDX
    I think I may just try making something like that.
     
  14. FretNoMore

    FretNoMore * Cooking with GAS *

    Jan 25, 2002
    The frozen north
    Here's a pic of the type of dolly I whipped together for my gear. This one is just an "indoors dolly" for my practice amp, so I can kick it under a table when I want it out of the way. The ones for my PA subs have larger lockable casters, but the principle is the same - holes for the feet to keep the cabs from sliding, and a strap to keep the dolly in place.

    [​IMG]

    Edit: added "lockable"...
     
  15. gfab333

    gfab333

    Mar 22, 2000
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    I installed the EB detachable casters on to an Eden 2-10XLT. They are made to be heavy duty and work great. No problems with potholes or casters falling out - they stay in until you pull them out. The casters do not seem to cause any perceivable impact on the tuning, tonality, or db volume of the cab.

    I stack the second 2-10XLT on to the first one and I have an easily transportable rig. I used a dolly before, but this is just one less item to deal with.

    There's a another nice thing about detachable casters when using just one cab... you can remove the two casters in the back of the cab, but leave the front casters in. you have a slightly tilted-back cab which works well for certain stage set-ups.

    I must say though, Anders' dolly looks very cool and functional.
     
  16. Forget dollies and drilling massive holes in your cab. Purchase a set of Mesa Trak-Lok casters and rest assured that you have the best available. The mount on the outside of your cab and slide in and out of place; no big holes for inserts that may mess up your tuning freq. Mesa casters are exceedingly smooth even over the roughest of terrain. I installed a set on my EB-MM HD212's.
     
  17. Captain Awesome

    Captain Awesome

    Apr 2, 2001
    PDX
    Price?
     
  18. Steven Green

    Steven Green

    Jul 25, 2001
    Pacific NW
    Yeah, I'm gonna spring for a few sets of Mesa's for the gear-buying spree I'm on!
     
  19. About $25 a set i think? $100 for all four, factory direct. The even pricier ones have ball bearings; those were installed on my old Mesa RR cabs. Maybe not cheap but for what you get it's a total deal IMO. These puppies are rugged and well built by Mesa themselves. They slide into place and lock in tight. Easily removed with the click of a button. Mine will even glide (ok, somewhat..) over gravel and other sketchy surfaces. If you are happy with those wobbely Eden/SWR style wheels then great. I used to hate them. For me, it was a great investment.
     
  20. Captain Awesome

    Captain Awesome

    Apr 2, 2001
    PDX
    I'm dealing with a $200 cab here, I think I'll just make a dolly or put in a standard issue detachable set.
     

Share This Page