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Adding wood to a headstock/tuner structure ?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by bassgod76, Jan 21, 2013.


  1. bassgod76

    bassgod76 bass turd burglar

    Mar 13, 2003
    South Florida
    I have a unique issue where I want to add wood to a Danelectro headstock.
    Danelectro_zpsc50fe7cc.jpg

    I'd like to move the A & D tuning posts, so they are directly on top of the E & G tuners.

    I would also like to add wood to the sides.

    I think the tuning peg shift will cause the holes to ride the seam of the wood wings.

    Will this present a structural issue?

    Or

    Will glue hold it?
     
  2. Musiclogic

    Musiclogic Commercial User

    Aug 6, 2005
    Southwest Michigan
    Owner/Builder: HJC Customs USA, The Cool Lute, C G O
    If the wood work is done properly, the glue join will be fine.
     
  3. bassgod76

    bassgod76 bass turd burglar

    Mar 13, 2003
    South Florida
    I've been told that correct glue and clamping would make the wood tougher than if it was one piece. We'll see. Maybe I will discover that the tuner barely occupies the added wings.
     
  4. HaMMerHeD

    HaMMerHeD

    May 20, 2005
    It'll be fine. Almost every laminated neck I've seen had tuner holes intersecting the glue lines.
     
  5. You may find the A and D strings are going to ride on the E and G once it's strung up. Double check your geometry up there.
    If it were me, I'd fill (dowel) the holes, cut the headstock down to a [near] perfect rectangle and glue the wings on. The joint will be the strongest part of the neck if done right. Doesn't matter if the tuning machines are mounted on the seam either; works well enough for Gibson.
     
  6. bassgod76

    bassgod76 bass turd burglar

    Mar 13, 2003
    South Florida
    Here's part II of my question.
    If I'm painting the headstock black, would I be required to laminate the face of the headstock? In short, would I be able to sand and fill the headstock, so when painted, the joints won't show through the finish?

    I would assume not when Fender uses two and three piece bodies?
     
  7. bassgod76

    bassgod76 bass turd burglar

    Mar 13, 2003
    South Florida
    I assume a band saw is the best tool for squaring off the sides?
     
  8. HaMMerHeD

    HaMMerHeD

    May 20, 2005
    You'll need to sand/seal/fill the headstock if you want the seams to be invisible when painted. The finish will otherwise likely sink into the glue.

    A bandsaw for the rough cut, and a hard sanding block to make the cut surface flat and square before you glue the wings on.
     
  9. Musiclogic

    Musiclogic Commercial User

    Aug 6, 2005
    Southwest Michigan
    Owner/Builder: HJC Customs USA, The Cool Lute, C G O
    Router and a straightedge with a pattern bit is going to get you the most joinable surface. I gave you an outline in the "reshaping a headstock" thread
     
  10. +1


    A bandsaw for this application sounds like an accident (or uneven line) waiting to happen.
     
  11. bassgod76

    bassgod76 bass turd burglar

    Mar 13, 2003
    South Florida
    That's what I was thinking. Thus why I ask you guys first! ;)
     
  12. bassgod76

    bassgod76 bass turd burglar

    Mar 13, 2003
    South Florida
  13. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
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