1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  

Adjusting a truss rod at the bottom of the neck...

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by DinnerWithAGypsy, Nov 9, 2010.


  1. So obviously righty-tighty, lefty-loosey applies when adjusting a truss rod at the headstock (aka, the top of the neck)...but what about a truss rod at the bottom of the fretboard (like on my Lakland basses)? If you turned a truss rod at the bottom of the fretboard righty-tighty looking from above it, wouldn't that be actually loosening it?

    Does this make sense? I'm trying to get into doing all my own setups, but this is a bit confusing to me.

    So, to tighten a truss rod regardless of whether you access it from the headstock or the bottom of the fretboard, you turn it to the right with the headstock as the "top" in your mind, correct?
    If that is right, it just feels like you're doing it backwards when you tighten a truss rod at the bottom of the fretboard, doesn't it?

    Sorry for how poorly worded this is. Hopefully you guys understand my confusion.
    Thanks.
     
  2. rob7

    rob7

    Jun 14, 2010
    no mater what end it is clockwise to tighten anti loosen.
     
  3. Alvaro Martín Gómez A.

    Alvaro Martín Gómez A. TalkBass' resident Bongo + cowbell player

    When I'm adjusting relief on a bass with bottom truss rod access, I put the instrument upside down (standing with the headstock on the floor). No confusion that way.
     
  4. Never had this problem with my Steinberger....
     
  5. Pilgrim

    Pilgrim Supporting Member

    ^^ Right. Lay the bass down. Stand at the bottom of the bass, next to the bottom strap mount. From that point of view, turn clockwise.
     
  6. Hi.

    Doesn't work with the guitarist I used to play with, but when thinking about threads, the ones on a booze bottle will always help ;).

    Righty=a break in boozing
    Lefty=enjoy

    (he just discards the cap and drinks it quickly enough not to lose any "aroma" ;))

    Regards
    Sam
     
  7. Still confused.
    So let's say you set the bass down flat on a table and are looking at it upside down straight down the neck from headstock to bridge. In this scenario, you would turn the truss rod so that it is visibly moving to the right in order to tighten it, regardless of whether the truss rod is up by the headstock or down at the end of the fingerboard, correct?
     
  8. Green1

    Green1

    Sep 23, 2010
    Scottsdale, AZ
    look at the bass from the bridge to the headstock. Turning the trussrod to the right will tighten in, which will bring your action lower. This is what is referred to as "adding relief" turning the trussrod to the left will remove relief, straighten the neck, and make the action higher. An easy way to remember is righty tighty, lefty loosey. Hope this helps.
     
  9. hasbeen

    hasbeen Commercial User

    Sep 23, 2004
    Vice President, KMC Music. Warwick U.S. distribution, Ampeg distribution
    OK- it is righty tighty either way. What changes is your point of view.

    So, at the head stock, you look down the neck, towards the body as your POV. From their, righty tighty.

    At the bottom of the neck, your POV is "up" the neck...towards the headstock. Now, turn the truss rod to your right.

    Another way to describe:

    If at the headstock, turn the truss rod to the upper horn to tighten. If at the bottom of the neck, turn to the lower horn.

    I hope this helps.
     
  10. hasbeen

    hasbeen Commercial User

    Sep 23, 2004
    Vice President, KMC Music. Warwick U.S. distribution, Ampeg distribution
    mm....I think you're a bit mixed up.

    Adding relief means you are loosening the truss rod....i.e. turning to the left.

    To straighten, you are removing relief.....i.e. turning to the right.
     
  11. F-Clef-Jef

    F-Clef-Jef

    Nov 13, 2006
    Neenah, WI
    Once I find that sucker, I am sooo gonna tighten it, just for spite! Is it still righty-tighty after daylight saving time? What about in the southern hemisphere?
     
  12. Pilgrim

    Pilgrim Supporting Member

    Just turn the dang thing CLOCKWISE to tighten, COUNTER-clockwise to loosen.

    This is far from rocket surgery.
     
  13. JTE

    JTE Supporting Member

    Mar 12, 2008
    Central Illinois, USA
    Clockwise from the point of reference facing the truss rod nut, no matter which end its attached to.

    Specifically on the Lakland. To decrease relief and straighten the neck, look at the bass from the bridge looking to the headstock. Tighten the nut by turning it clockwise.

    If you need MORE relief, you need to loosen the nut by turning it COUNTER CLOCKWISE.

    If this still baffles you, step away from the bass, take it to someone who knows this stuff, and turn in your bass-player card- you MUST be a drummer! :D:D:bag:
     
  14. Green1

    Green1

    Sep 23, 2010
    Scottsdale, AZ
    I think your right.....oops
     
  15. Pilgrim

    Pilgrim Supporting Member


    Brilliance.
     
  16. haha That's what I was looking for, man: a good concise explanation.
    So facing the truss rod as your point of reference it's always a clockwise turn to tighten the truss rod. Got it.
     
  17. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    think of it this way: whichever end you look at, to straighten the neck you tighten the rod, and tightening it involves screwing the part you stick the wrench into down onto a threaded part inside the neck.

    it's just like tightening any other screw or bolt.
     
  18. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    this is all except for certain pedullas, which work backwards (lefty-tighty).
     
  19. Really? Which ones?
     
  20. SamanthaCay

    SamanthaCay Like bass guitar OMG!

    Nov 16, 2008
    Denver, CO.
    Geeze I can’t believe it took 18 posts for someone to mention this. Yes on some basses it is backwards either due to reverse treads or an upside down mounted two way rod. Although this is pretty rare, they do exist. If your unsure you can just lightly turn the nut both ways and in most cases as long as the rod isn’t totally seized up this will tell you which way is which.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.