Advice in restoring a special bass

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by troutstudio, Feb 11, 2004.

  1. troutstudio


    Feb 11, 2004
    My wife's father passed away this week. I played in a band with him for a while - I play drums. He was a kind gentle man who suffered a lot of disappointments in his life but was not bitter. His best groove was the Ray Charles big walking four and he rocked at it. He died in a fire. His most recent bass was a Spectre, which to me looks pretty trashed (very black and crusty). The other was a P bass - about 1975. It is really only blackened on the headstock - the rest of the bass is in fair to worn condition. My question is: I want to restore this bass for my wife and want to know if it's ok to take off the neck and try to get the smoke off the tuning pegs and head. I suppose it's nitrocellulose? Is it safe to strip it myself? I want to take the neck to a luthier and get it set up correctly but I guess I'm wondering if it's ok to begin a careful dismantle myself. Any tips or websites - look I'd really appreciate it. He was a good musician and I want to do this right. He was planning to sell this bass and I see it as a good sign that it survived at all. Cheers, trout.
  2. Tim Cole

    Tim Cole

    Jun 12, 2002
    Findlay, Ohio
    Sorry to hear of your loss bro.

    I'd reccomend sending these instruments to a qualified lutheir for repair. Do you have pics of the spector? I am sure we could let you know if it were salvageable or not. As far as repairs go, Micheal Dolan does tremendous work, and at great prices. You can contact him here:
  3. troutstudio


    Feb 11, 2004
    Thanks for your posting Tim. In a series of very strange events, it became clear to us that the Spector should be buried with Tony (the owner). It was his wish it seemed, and it is very badly damaged (evidently beyond repair). The P bass will pull through, but may need strengthening at the headstock. As it also needs refretting etc, I will be sending it as you suggested to a well respected luthier.


    Paul Kneipp.