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Advice on building a Franken Bass

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Tchar, Aug 13, 2016.


  1. Tchar

    Tchar

    May 8, 2016
    Québec
    Hi,

    I don't know if this is the right place to ask this, so let me know if I should post elsewhere.

    I'm planning on building a franken bass. I'd like to build something along the lines of a fender P/J style bass. Does anyone know where I should look for parts? What sites are worth looking at, I've seen Warmoth and was wondering about the quality of their product, say how it would compare to and original fender part. Where should I look if I were trying to find said fender parts?

    I'm not much of a luthier, more of a bass player and I'd like to try and assemble my own bass. I might go see a professional if I feel overwhelmed, but I'd like to choose my own parts.

    I have a budget of about $900, and I don't mind starting out with cheaper parts to try them out and upgrade later.

    I'd really appreciate advice on this subject from anyone who may have atempted this before!

    Thanks!
     
    MrRubi04 likes this.
  2. brianmharrison

    brianmharrison

    Oct 11, 2007
    Atlanta
    I just posted that I am starting a similar first project! I looked around and All parts seems to have good parts. If you know the part numbers of what you are after you can buy them other places. I bought my body from Warmoth because you can pick the actual piece of wood (I'm doing natural finish)
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2016
  3. redboy1975

    redboy1975

    Apr 24, 2011
    Sorrento
    If I were you I'd look on Ebay. I typed in Fender bass body and got hundreds of bodies from 70.00 bucks to 500.00 bucks . You'll have to measure the neck pocket and find a suitable neck that fits it . Should be a simple project if all your going to do is assemble it .
     
  4. buldog5151bass

    buldog5151bass Kibble, milkbones, and P Basses. And redheads.

    Oct 22, 2003
    Connecticut
    Warming seems tobe the most popular here. I seen All Parts more common for shops that do building. I don't see any reason to spend more money to buy something that says "Fender" on it.
     
  5. Spell check strikes again?
     
  6. buldog5151bass

    buldog5151bass Kibble, milkbones, and P Basses. And redheads.

    Oct 22, 2003
    Connecticut
    . Stubby fingers and small tablets are not a good combination.
     
    Matthew Fisher likes this.
  7. deepestend

    deepestend Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 21, 2003
    Brooklyn via Austin and NOLA
    Guitar/Bass Builder and Social Media at Sadowsky
    You should have a weight goal in mind and try to stick to that so that you don't end up with a boat anchor. I'd try to have the whole thing come in at under 9lbs. USACG for the neck and the body doesn't matter as much.
     
  8. For a first build bass, I would advise a single pickup bass. It makes life a lot easier first time around. I would advise a MM pickup for a first build. A great sound and easily mated to a good 2/3 band EQ.
     
  9. deepestend

    deepestend Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 21, 2003
    Brooklyn via Austin and NOLA
    Guitar/Bass Builder and Social Media at Sadowsky
    Try oil the neck and try to get a finished body. Don't stress in the tuners, they don't need to be amazing. Same for the bridge. Get a high mass clone if possible. Get a used Bart preamp on the classifieds.
     
  10. MrBassman17

    MrBassman17

    Dec 30, 2011
    Brewster, NY
    I have 'assembled' several basses. A Fender Jazz, Precision, and several 'Frankenbasses', one of which I still have. From my experience, I can tell you that a: don't waste your money on cheaper parts only to upgrade later. All you end up with is a drawer full of parts you don't have any use for, and can't get rid of, so determine what it is you want and get the best you can afford; and b: stick to a 'known quality' source. There are many options on eBay and other places, but for a first build, stick to something you know will work; i.e. just about all fender jazz or precision bodies and necks are interchangeable. Overall, if you want to have the experience of building your own bass, it is fun and will be very satisfying, if not the cheapest way to go. For under $900 you should be able to assemble a reasonably good quality instrument. Good luck - post photo's as you go along so we can see how you're doing!
     
    ctmullins and Will_White like this.

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