1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  
     
    TalkBass.com has been uniting the low end since 1998.  Join us! :)

Advice on fingering

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by CrazyArcher, May 8, 2006.


  1. CrazyArcher

    CrazyArcher

    Aug 5, 2004
    Israel
    I need opinions here. What's the optimal way to play a sequence of notes at the same fret but on different strings, like those featured in this small fragment:
    Code:
    ------------
    ------------
    ----5--7----
    -5--------7-
    
    One way I thought about is to use the same finger in a barre fashion, but this is somewhat awkward and tends to produce buzz at times. Alternatively, using different fingers produces perfect sound, but impedes mobility. I guess there's no 100% true answer, but there should be some guidelines at least...
    PS: yeah, I need instruction...
     
  2. THERAKED1

    THERAKED1

    Apr 23, 2006
    Columbus,OH
    Depending on the speed, I'd comfortably play it with my first finger barring the fifth fret, my third for the 7th fret on the A string, and my second for the 7th fret on the E. I could also play it 1,2,4,3. I think that it really just depends on the groove and where you are going afterwards, but then again I probably need instruction as well.
     
  3. 1- Index on 5th fret (barré), pluck E string with index, mute with right thumb.
    2- Pluck A string (5th fret) with middle, mute with right index.
    3- Left pinky on 7th fret, pluck with right index, mute with middle

    Two options for last move:

    4a- Left Pinky on 7th fret, pluck with right index
    4b- Left Ring on 7th fret, pluck with right index

    Voilà! No buzz, clean sound. The right hand muting is very important. Practice slowly.
     
  4. Pierre_Pontroli

    Pierre_Pontroli

    Mar 18, 2006
    Sorry if I'm hi-jacking your thread :meh:

    I never knew of that muting technique, i would just release the pressure on my left hand to mute it, is that wrong?!
     
  5. Very wrong. You might damage your amp. Seriously, releasing pressure creates a slight buzz. It's not really noticable in a live band or when playing fast but it's there. You might notice it when playing soft or recording.

    Right hand muting also teaches your fingers to stay on the strings, ready to play, which translate to better speed while staying relaxed.

    It's good to practice playing soft, and I mean soft, as in barely audible. That's when you hear all the unwanted noises. If you can get a good sound at that level, you can get a good sound at any level.
     
  6. steveb98

    steveb98 [acct disabled - multiple aliases]

    Mar 15, 2006
    Venice, CA
    I just asked Adam Nitti about this expect it was on decending three strings at the same fret. Answer was as I expected, it all depends. Sometime I roll my finger from string to string especially if only two strings like your example. Sometimes I will just barre it if going up to a higher string. Decending this the hard one and especially if more than two string. Then sometimes it is easier to use more than one finger.

    Another variable in this is which finger if first or second for me I have enough strength to roll or barre it, but third and especially fourth finger aren't as strong and when I tend to use multiple fingers.

    Basically you need to be able to do whatever is necessary their is no one right answer.
     
  7. steveb98

    steveb98 [acct disabled - multiple aliases]

    Mar 15, 2006
    Venice, CA
    I would say probably yes it is wrong. You need to be able to mute with both hands because different situation require different solutions. Releasing pressure like you are talking about will usually sound bad due to fret buzz. I would say that is a situation where right hand muting would be better. It's like guys who play shuffles by bouncing their finger. That can be real noisy with fret rattle. Keep the finger down and use right hand muting to create the shuffle. No noise and the rhythmic pattern is more distintive.

    I tend to use left hand muting because I'm leaving a string and need to quiet it. Their are no hard and fast rules you have to be able to mute with both hands and practiced enough where subconsciencly your hands are doing the right thing.
     
  8. Jeff Martinez

    Jeff Martinez

    May 10, 2005
    Denver, CO
    My first reaction would be to go in this order:

    1. e-string 5th - middle finger
    2. a-string 5th - index finger
    3. a-string 7th - pinky
    4. e-string 7th - 3rd finger

    To me, this takes advantage of the different finger lengths, and keeps my fingers from being too committed to one position.

    Just my odd way of looking at things, I guess.
     
  9. bleh. For anyone that read my post I deleted it because I'd misread :)
     
  10. It's not as complex as it reads! No more difficult than walking or riding a bicycle. The thumb is just standard floating thumb and the rest are rest strokes or muting with the finger that will pluck the next note. And you can't mute the E string with a rest stroke since you just played it and the finger is now on the B string (or in the air).

    I picked up my bass and played it without thinking. I'm used to three plucking fingers so it went like this:

    1- E string, 5th fret - Pluck with index, mute with thumb
    2- A string, 5th fret - Pluck with ring, mute with middle
    3- A string, 7th fret - Pluck with middle (falls on E string), mute with ring
    4- E string, 7th fret - Pluck with middle, mute with index

    Now you're back in the initial position and ready to loop it ad vitam eternam...
     
  11. chaosMK

    chaosMK

    May 26, 2005
    Albuquerque, NM
    Hi-fi into an old tube amp
    I would use a few fingers and keep my hand in the same position.

    1)- index
    2)-middle
    3)-pinky
    4)-ring
     
  12. permagrin

    permagrin

    May 1, 2003
    San Pedro, CA
    I can use the same finger to "barre" or at least roll between two notes on adjacent strings on a Jazz-sized neck, but wider necks force a different solution.
     

Share This Page