Affinity vs. VM or CV P-Bass?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Diesel Kilgore, Jul 4, 2012.

  1. Would an Affinity with some nice flatwounds on it even come close to the classic "quality" p-bass sound that I hear the VM's and CV's deliver?

    Also, what are the main differences in the pickups, neck, wood between the 3? What makes the Affinity a "beginner" and what makes the VM and the CV a nice "almost Fender"?

    I really want a nice P-bass on a budget and have had it in mind to go with a CV. But getting even more budget minded, I thought I would ask if an Affinity could even give me what I want? I don't know if my comparison is really any good, beginner Squier vs. midrange type Fender's.

  2. Mastermold

    Mastermold Supporting Member

    May 5, 2008
    Orange County, California
    I'd go with the CV. It's just a better all around instrument and for not much more scratch.
  3. Not to steal from this thread, but I'd also be interested in knowing if the 3 basses mentioned above have the same "fat P" neck profile, or the thin "jazz like" neck.
  4. Plucky The Bassist

    Plucky The Bassist Bassist for Michael "Epic Mic" Rowe

    Jul 30, 2010
    Houston, TX
    VM's and CV's have had more "jazzy" necks IME (I own the VM 70's J and the CV 60's P). They are pretty comfy and make the instrument all the more fun to play.

    To the OP: The build quality isn't terrible on the affinity Squiers, but it's really hard to look at anything other than the CVs since they came out. I currently own basses from both series (see above) and I used to own a VM P-bass. The biggest difference for me was the electronics, hands down...

    The VM P that I had wasn't bad, but the Duncan Designed pickup wasn't very full sounding and came off sounding very nasally for a P pickup. Now that was a problem I never had with my CV 60's P, in fact sometimes it's been too bassy and I've had to tone it down lol. The pickups on the CVs are supposed to be "real" Fender pickups, and they sound pretty good to me right out of the box. Fast forward a few months to now and I have a foam mute under the chrome bridge cover and a set of dead D'Addario Chromes..."thump" is an understatement lol.

    The only thing I could imagine changing to it would be the pickup (and that's me struggling to find a weak point), it sounds like a P for sure, but that unbalanced emphasis that P's are known for isn't quite there with the stock pickup. Even so, a Fender '62 RI pickup is about $70 and it's around $360 for a CV 60's P. If you're handy with a soldering iron and basic setups, you've got something better than a MIM Fender for under $450! IMO, the necks on the CVs are better than the MIM's anyhow, so win-win there. I can PM you some audio samples of my P if you want :bassist:
  5. Hey VT, that would be great if you can shoot me some audio. Mp3?
  6. Sanci


    Jun 17, 2012

    I checked the Fender website and it says alder body to the affinity, which is a plus.
    I played both, and the classic vibe 60s preci does play a lot better. Neck on the cv is more like a jazzy one, and makes you want to play. Feels great. I would say a cv p is a serious instrument on an almost pro level. Pickups do sound like a fender p, whereas the affinity lacks the sound and feel.

    Go with the cv. Btw. Fiesta red is great looking ...
  7. Wallace320


    Mar 19, 2012
    Milan, Italy
    Hi man,
    how're you doin'?

    Squier had 7 lines of instrument: from low to high

    Affinity (CIC):
    alder body (+) poor finishing/hardware (-)

    Some Artist series fall into Standard QC (CII):
    Pete Wentz Precision, Mike Dirnt Precision, Frank Bello Jazz

    Standard (CII) discontinued:
    agathis body (-) average finishing/hardware (-)

    Active Deluxe series fall under Vintage Modified QC (CII):
    IV and V Jazz

    Vintage Modified (CII):
    agathis (-)/maple (+)/basswood body (+) average finishing/hardware (-)

    Some Artist series fall under Classic Vibe QC (CIC):
    Matt Freeman Precision, James Johnston Jazz

    Classic Vibe (CIC):
    basswood body (+) proficient finishing/hardware (+)

    Hope to be of any help

  8. I might as well spend the little extra cash and get what I want. I WANT my own James Jamerson bass. :)

    But while we're on the topic, how would the Affinity compare to my old Samick P-bass I had? The Samick sounded great when I was 17. lol. But i've heard thru the years that Samick is quite quality for the price. If an Affinity is worse then that, then i'd be able to make a better comparison.
  9. Sanci


    Jun 17, 2012
    Get to your local GC and compare them to your samick.
    Maybe an affinity can do it for you. Never buy instruments without testing.

    I do think that a good neck ads alot to a comfy and good sounding instrument.
    So just by adding a little you could get a reliable instrument.

    Play them, test them and make your own thoughts. You could save up a lot in the end.
  10. Aussie Player

    Aussie Player

    Apr 20, 2011
    it is the individual instrument.
    I own an Affinity 5 Jazz and is stays.
    When I owned a MIA Jazz V I compared to 2 very closely. The Afinity sounded better, clearer, more volume, better finished, neck pocket to neck very tight against the MIA, and I liked the 5 in a row tuners better than the 4 over 1 which looks like the after thought is was.

    My advice is to play basses until you know you have the one you want to buy.
  11. Plucky The Bassist

    Plucky The Bassist Bassist for Michael "Epic Mic" Rowe

    Jul 30, 2010
    Houston, TX
    Check your PMs :D
  12. Plucky The Bassist

    Plucky The Bassist Bassist for Michael "Epic Mic" Rowe

    Jul 30, 2010
    Houston, TX
    There was a LOT that went into Jamerson's bass tone...and it wasn't just his P-bass.

    The DI that they used in those Motown recordings was very unique in and of itself (a search on here could bring up the article about it). The way they were mixed had a lot to do with it as well. A lot of cats get a P-bass with the '62 RI pickups and expect this massively insane thump, when part of the thump they heard on those old records was the low-mids mixing in so well with the bass drum and cutting through the mix all at the same time. I'd like to say mine thumps pretty hard, but a '62 RI would set it over the edge for me. If you really want to get that Jamerson type sound, I would strongly recommend the bridge mute in addition to some flats. Chromes can get the job done, but there are better sets of flats out there that will practically crush your eardrums with a low E.

    For the inexpensive route: Get the CV, replace with the '62 RI pickup, put chromes on it, put a rubber foam mute at the bridge, buy a Tech 21 VT bass, and a new Ampeg Portaflex 1x15 cab.

    The "money is no object" route: Same bass as before but with an allparts P-bass neck, Nordstrand NP-4 pickup, and TI Jazz flats, one of these little beauties , and a nice cracker box to live in (or dog house if you are married) :bag:

    Jamerson tone is very sought-after, but a lot of it was in the fingers. The CV with the pickup, foam, and string mods will definitely get you in the right ballpark though. In the middle of a gig with guitars and drums going, nobody will be able to tell the difference except for you and that jerk bass player in the front row watching your every move ;)
  13. Great info guys. I kinda want more of the Jamerson style, and not really the complete sound. If I can get a cheap P, put flatwounds on it and it came as close "in my head" to his sound would be nice. ;) Especially playing thru a 30w practice amp. lol. I love the look of the Squier/Fender's, Jag, Jazz, P, all of them. I was thinking Affinity would be a good bass to mod as well without having to worry about wrecking it, and I get the looks I want.

    I'm jumping around with thoughts here..... i've also heard and read here at TB that the Affinity Jazz is more sought after then the P? What's the consensus on that?
  14. MakoMan


    Oct 17, 2011
    IMHO, the Affinity's get a bit of an undeserved bad wrap on TB, particularly when compared to the CV line. At most stores they are half the price of a CV, but they are certainly not half the bass. You can also find good ones used easily for under 100 bucks.
    The neck on the P Affinity is pretty much a tradition Precision neck... the VM and CV necks are slimmer. But some people like the thicker necks. The tuners are not perfect, but they stay in tune, there is no neck dive and the bass is well balanced. The pickups sound fine and can be easily swapped for a set of Quarter Pounders or the like.
    I have a Chinese made Affinity as a kick around bass and backup and I absolutely love it. At 7 years old the pots are still fine, everything works like new... I hate to say it but my VM Jag pots started to crackle after a couple of months. It sits on a stand and gets played more than any other bass I have, outside on the deck, parties, you name it. It is a 'don't even think about it bass'. It's also my backup bass and while it's not quite my MIM Fender, I'd have no hesitation whatsoever in using it on stage.
    For me it's the perfect mod, kick-around and backup bass. Your results may vary :)
  15. wilfred


    Jun 17, 2012
    Ok I keep reading that the vm pbass has a thinner neck? Mine is not anything like a jazz neck its a faty pbass neck. So Idk if mine is just different its a 07. I plan on changing the stoke neck for a mm jazz neck.. and imo the vm is more of a punk and rock sounding playing bass, so not a good choice for motown.
  16. CV all the way. I gig once and twice a week, and the CV 60s P is my go to bass. I've had quite a few MIA Fenders, and this thing is as good as any of them. Plus if anything happens to it I'm not gonna have a heart attack.
  17. kinsonal


    Sep 23, 2011
    I own a vm but i always felt the j-bass neck was thicker in comparison
  18. CLMSHQ


    Apr 17, 2007
    Danielson, CT
    I had a CV 60's P...and I miss it :crying:
  19. The answer to this question will be solved shortly. ;) :D :bassist:
  20. Bassquest


    Dec 31, 2010
    I have P's in both the Affinity and VM series. Both are fine as stock instruments.