Al McKibbon R.I.P.

Discussion in 'Bassists [DB]' started by Dig_Wilbur_Ware, Jul 30, 2005.

  1. R.I.P Al McKibbon. (b. Jan 1st, 1917 - d. July 29th, 2005)
    Thanks for the great stuff with Monk, Diz, and Herbie Nichols. And muchas gracias for anchoring Latin Jazz so distinctively and with so much Soul.
  2. Jeremy Allen

    Jeremy Allen Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2002
    Bloomington, IN
    Awww, of the fattest sounds around. Although I loved him for the jazz stuff, I also found that many times when I heard some LA studio stuff with great bass playing on it I'd dig around and it would always turn out to be Al.

    He's another product of Cass Tech, the Detroit high school that turned out a bunch of jazz guys as well as about half of the Motown Record Corp. roster. Wonder who that band director was...
  3. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    We're losing a lot of bench strength here lately...
    RIP Al.
  4. Thanks Ray. Al was another special cat. I worked with Cal Tjader and the great conga player Armando Perazza for a bit and they had some wonderful road warrior stories about the time they spent with Al. He was an impeccable latin bassist. He had a long, storied, special relationship with George Shearing. In fact, i've seen more than one article or interview with George where he mentions the close relationship he had with Al, as well as the one he had with the great Israel Crosby.
    Yeah, we're losing one after the other.
  5. Francois Blais

    Francois Blais Supporting Member

    Dec 11, 1999
    Québec, Canada
    "All Music Guide" and "Dictionnaire de jazz" both give 1919 as his birth year.
    Where did you take 1917?
  6. "I was born Alfred McKibbon on January 1st, 1919 at 12:00am in Chicago, Illinois. My Family moved to Detroit, Michigan two years later."

    same place Ray spotted the Jacob Steiner 1650. problem is, the title bar says, erroneously, 1917. so, 1-1-'19 it is.
  7. The Roots of the Heart series hosted by Harry Belafonte has got a nice little segment on the making of Manteca...there's some ol' footage of ol' Al bumpin' the da da da da da da da...baumb....

    RIP latin soul brother

    i've got "Tumbao Para Los Congueros" playing right now, sweet tone.