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All Business at a gig - ranting? Probably...

Discussion in 'Band Management [BG]' started by jimbob, Aug 28, 2003.


  1. jimbob

    jimbob

    Dec 26, 2001
    Charlotte NC
    Endorsing Artist: Acoustica Mixcraft; Endorsing Artist: DR Strings
    I don't post topics often, but I gig very regularly in some cover bands in my area.

    As Bassists, we rely on the rest of the band to play to their potential to make "the rest of it" sound good and when that doesn't happen, we don't happen as bassists or performers.

    How do you folks handle issues of really musical and talented people who do not see the consequences (business wise) of what they do/say on stage? Swearing, inappropriate jokes, stoners/drunks... This is not every situation. Just every now and then it tends to happen and I would like to find a reasonable statement for those times. I know experience helps, but how do you "suggest" that they grow up?


    About Me...if you care...

    I approach gigs as a business venture. I smile, play with conviction, sing in key, move around a bit, smile, don't swear on stage, smile, don't smoke cig's on stage, smile, and try and control myself off stage with the bar tab. I'm no saint, I'm drinking a beer now, but I just look at the opportunity to play as an opportunity to play again. These club owners pay and I want them to believe they are getting their monies worth and have the bands I play with back.

    Back to the question...

    How do you folks handle issues of really musical and talented people who do not see the consequences (business wise) of what they do/say on stage? Swearing, inappropriate jokes, stoners/drunks... This is not every situation. Just every now and then it tends to happen and I would like to find a reasonable statement for those times. I know experience helps, but how do you "suggest" that they grow up?
     
  2. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    Here y'go: "Hey assbite, GROW UP!"

    Buttmunch works well, too.
     
  3. jimbob

    jimbob

    Dec 26, 2001
    Charlotte NC
    Endorsing Artist: Acoustica Mixcraft; Endorsing Artist: DR Strings
    Re: Hey A$%Monch...Grow up! That is the route I'm taking now. I/We have taped shows and as obvious as the acting is, the people just don't seem to catch on....I am leaving one situation - taking the drummer with me. We decided this AM to move on. Now we have to get someone who's just a little more professional than the last guy and we'll be a bit better...:rolleyes:
     
  4. jive1

    jive1 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jan 16, 2003
    Alexandria,VA
    Owner/Retailer: Jive Sound
    I know what you are talking about jimbob. My statement is usually "Act like you've done this before", or "Act like you want to do this again"
     
  5. jimbob

    jimbob

    Dec 26, 2001
    Charlotte NC
    Endorsing Artist: Acoustica Mixcraft; Endorsing Artist: DR Strings
    "Act like you want to do this again"

    EXACTLY!

    You must be in sales too:p

    I'm telling ya...balancing the left and right side of your brain in the busic biz is tough to do. If you are interested in getting hammered, swearing, and doing other unprofessional actions on stage...you don't belong on stage as a semi-pro/pro. Jeez, I mean, that member of the audience that is looking for a band to play at their company party - and has $2500 + to spend on it - does not want a bunch of drunk, uncouth (sp?) pigs showing up much less entertaining his/her boss! See the opportunities!

    I guess if these guy's/girls want to act like that, they are missing the opportunity to really do something and have a great time doing it...I mean, leave the crazy frontman stuff and attitude to the major signed acts. You are in a club for goodness sakes!

    Told you it would be a rant...Can you tell it's been bothering me for a while?
     
  6. CS

    CS

    Dec 11, 1999
    UK
    Part of the problem is that often we are too tolerant (and yes I see the irony in me saying it) and put up, with well crap, from people in the vane hope that they will improve and this save us from a conflict situation.

    The truth is that you know who is capable of change and who is not. Everytime I have got rid of someone or myself from a situation I have felt a lot better. YMMV
     
  7. ConU

    ConU

    Mar 5, 2003
    La Belle Province
    With a pro attitude like that,you'll do just fine:)
    In the other situations,if the money is really good,I just ignore it,nothing you say to amateurs like that sinks in.If the money sucks,I don't do anymore gigs with them.
    I learned a long time ago in this business to watch my own ass.:cool:
     
  8. P. Aaron

    P. Aaron Supporting Member

    Every show/gig is just an ongoing job interview. There's almost always someone new in each audience.

    The bands job is to show the audience a "good time". IE: Having the audience remember a "good show" that you and your band performed for them. You won't always please everyone with song selection, but don't insult the crowd over the PA, if you're going to make fun of someone over the PA, it better be the drummer.

    But really, if you want your band to succeed, you start and finish each show like a pro, and rehearse the same way.
     
  9. brianrost

    brianrost Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 26, 2000
    Boston, Taxachusetts
    One of the following:

    1. Say something CONSTRUCTIVE that might sway them to act differently. The important thing is to not criticize!

    2. Turn down any future gig offers.

    3. Ignore it.
     
  10. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    Word.

    Double word.
     
  11. jimbob

    jimbob

    Dec 26, 2001
    Charlotte NC
    Endorsing Artist: Acoustica Mixcraft; Endorsing Artist: DR Strings
    Thanks for the responses so far...they have been great and have helped me gain a fresh perspective. I have some good opportunities in front of me...leaving shortly for a Private Party with one of my bands - the one that acts professionally.

    Reflecting, I figure I'll stay optomistic, work hard, and when it comes to the people I gig with, I will try not to overlook the things that can damage my credibiity.

    I'll keep watching! Keep the notes coming! BTW Paul, This Band Management forum rules!
     
  12. LiquidMidnight

    LiquidMidnight

    Dec 25, 2000
    Excellent thread and one that anyone playing professionally should look at.

    Jim, you are absolutley right, it is a business. When someone hires you, you are expected to perform certain obligations. Getting drunk, obnoxious, throwing a temper tauntrum on stage, and acting pretentious is terrible business etiquette. Also, I'm glad you brought up the swearing over the microphone point. I actually know bands who lost bookings because of the singers' language between songs. I doubt most club goers are so PC that they couldn't handle the occasional "damn" or "hell", but letting out F-bombs and the like is totally unprofessional. (personally I think that it's ironic that the f word is considered profanity and any other word that means fornicate, isn't, but that's getting into philosophy and phenomenology, so for the sake of present cultural context, we'll just say it's unprofessional :p ) As far as dirty jokes, leave that for Andrew Dice Clay.

    Another thing that I think should be addressed is cleanlyness and grooming. Don't go to a gig looking like you just got off of work at the diesel garage. You are a performer, part of the aspect of playing music in a club is the visual aspect. I'm not saying you have to wear a tux, or glam yourself up like Bon Jovi, but put on a clean outfit and shave for pete's sake. A little anecedote about a band my father was in to drive my point home: The lead singer kept the PA head on the floor. Everytime he bent down to do an adjustment, his ass crack would hang out. Well, when the drummer went to collect the money at the end of the gig, the club owner said he would love to have them back, but asked them if they could get the singer to wear a belt.