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Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by hateater, Oct 8, 2005.


  1. hateater

    hateater snatch canadian cream

    May 4, 2001
    Eugene, OR
    Don't let GAS get your eyeballs salivating. What I mean, is that gear only takes you so far. It is hard to think otherwise when coming here for the first time. Understand that you don't NEED a bass made out of exotic woods and state of the art features. However, it is best to buy a bass that is capable of staying in tune and can be set up to fit your preferences. Most basses in the $400-$750 will meet your needs... with minimal problems.

    For a rig, you WILL have to spend a little more than you will want to in order to be able to keep up with your band (especially if you are a loud band). I am also going to say that while you might be able to get great results from high end companies, in my experience, Carvin gets the job done just fine... and they are pretty easy on the wallet.

    Work on your technique, writing and general theory. Money can't buy musical knowledge, that is all you. Never forget why you are playing- remember your heroes. Play your ass off and have a good time.
     
  2. Ryan L.

    Ryan L. Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Aug 7, 2000
    West Fargo, ND
    +1. The fancy gear will come in time, when and if you decide you need/want it. And with more experience playing comes more knowledge of what YOU really need as far as basses and amps go. Going out and buying a Fodera is not going to make you play or sound like Vic Wooten. And once you are more experienced as a player, that fancy 7 string melted top Conklin may not be anywhere close to what you really need/want.

    But I still want a Ritter. No, I still NEED a Ritter. :p :D
     
  3. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    What in the HELL are you talking about? Buying less than the finest gear puts an a priori limit on how good you can sound. The better gear you buy, the greater your potential for great sound. Why doesn't Nathan East play a DP custom? Sure, he'd sound good on it, but not nearly as good as he does on those custom Yamahas.

    New people, don't listen to this guy. You need the very best gear you or your parents can afford, and even that might not be good enough. GAS is a badge of honor here, and the fulfillment of it is the fulfillment of life. Cripe.
     
  4. hateater

    hateater snatch canadian cream

    May 4, 2001
    Eugene, OR

    OK- let's be honest here. How many of your non bass playing friends have EVER commented on the awesome tone that so and so bassist gets? Unless you are a very serious and dedicated solo bassist/studio guy.... I say to hell with it. I play my valenti jazz through a peavey something rather 15 combo with a carvin 2 x 10 stacked on top. It sounds great.
     
  5. syciprider

    syciprider Banned

    May 27, 2005
    Inland Empire
    Well, $400 to $750 will not get you a Stingray. Can you set a higher ceiling?
     
  6. adisu

    adisu I admit it, I'm a "user"

    Apr 8, 2005
    Israel
    I'm with munjibunga....
    You don't need a good sound to impress your non-bass player friends you need the good sound for yourself.
    I don't recommend to buy fodera custom BG as your first bass but after you decide you wanna' be a real pro bass player , Improving your sound will help you fill more comfortable and improve your playing.
    Personally i fill much better when i play my Fender BXR 100w AMP than when i play my childhood AMP Crate 15w.
     
  7. Greg Clinkingbeard

    Greg Clinkingbeard

    Apr 4, 2005
    Kansas City area
    Setup and repair/KRUTZ Strings
    Great post!!! I saw Bonnie Raitt in concert this week and Hutch Hutchinson played the paint off of what looked like an Alder PJ. On a few tunes he used a fretless acoustic. His playing was always tasteful and versatile. Tone was 'old school' and fit the music.

    The guy for the opening act played an active Lakeland 5 but wasn't nearly the player Hutch was that night. He had some flash but just didn't groove.

    Point: We're in this to make music as part of a collective band or combo. Equipment can help us make music but we have to make it with our hearts, minds and hands.
     
  8. Matt Till

    Matt Till

    Jun 1, 2002
    Edinboro, PA
    I'm so glad I learned on a POS bass for 2 years. When I stepped up to something better, I started to fly! If you can sound great on a cheap bass.... when you get your dream bass, you will be a god.
     
  9. Ray-man

    Ray-man Guest

    Sep 10, 2005
    Gee, I wonder who you work for? Shameless hussie. Peddle your wares elsewhere.
     
  10. Fo' Shizzle

    Fo' Shizzle

    Aug 28, 2003
    I'm with Munji on this. (That may be a first!!)

    The quest for the One True Tone is a life-long calling. You might as well get started.

    I've been playing for 25+ years. I'm closer to the sound in my head, but there are still miles to go.

    Buy gear, used and new, cheap and boutique, as much as you can afford.

    Fo
     
  11. hateater

    hateater snatch canadian cream

    May 4, 2001
    Eugene, OR

    You son of a .... I don't even have a job... I am a student of music. All I do is play the bass and piano. I am just speaking off of experience buddy. Also, I wasn't saying that you shouldn't buy a nice bass at some point, I just think that you should really get a sense of what music is and what you want to accomplish as a player before you decide to throw down a big hunk of cash on that MTD. Hell, I wouldnt mind owning a Fodera- but what I have now gets the job done just fine. As for the rig section- I don't think ya'll got exactly what I was saying. Buy that nice ampeg stack- it is mportant that early on that you get something durable that will last and can keep up with your band. I can only push out 150 watts, but that is loud enough for every situation I have ever been in, and no audience members have ever complained about my tone. I mean- If you need more watts than say... 300 or so, then you are either playing large outdoor venues with no PA, or the guy running the boards is a doofus.
     
  12. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    You play too many notes.
     
  13. hateater

    hateater snatch canadian cream

    May 4, 2001
    Eugene, OR
    I love ninja scroll. That movie is badass.
     
  14. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    Ya, but what was the deal with that penguin?
     
  15. hateater

    hateater snatch canadian cream

    May 4, 2001
    Eugene, OR

    Nah, that was that Garth Brooks album where he looked like a fat Trent Reznor... Chris Gaines?
     
  16. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    And here I was buying milk from the market. Wow.
     
  17. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    I'm getting a nibble, but not enough to set the hook. And what's up with all you people agreeing with me? While I believe what I say is true for someone who has the resources, I think it's more important to get a bass and start playing. There'll be plenty o' GAS down the road. Sorry to all my followers. I've let you down, for sure. But I still say buy the best gear you can possibly afford. You'll find yourself swapping it out much less often.
     
  18. hateater

    hateater snatch canadian cream

    May 4, 2001
    Eugene, OR
    It's true, but you are way off topic.
     
  19. Fender32

    Fender32

    Jun 23, 2005
    Kent, England
    So, back to the original point.

    It's a very noble sentiment, but the reality of the situation is that it's about as likely as getting all the people who buy Porsches and Ferraris to take extra driving lessons and buy a Nissan Micra instead? :bag:
    Most of them have driving skills less akin to Michael Schumacher and more akin to Michael Mouse, but that doesn't stop them doing what they want to do and lovin' it (even if the rest of us hate them for it)! ;)

    Let the idiots with more money than talent go out and blow it all (I can say that because I'm one of them. It's not that I'm fabulously rich, it's just that I'm very short on talent) :bawl: .

    Fools like me generate a wealth of "closet classics", by buying the gear and not knowing what to do with it for twenty years. In turn, we then sell it on to the next generation of talented musicians, who weren't around to buy the stuff when it was new and now want a good condition example to actually play. :eek: Thereby, the whole beautiful cycle repeats itself and harmony and balance is restored to the cosmos. THE END.

    :ninja: (convinced yet)? :rollno:
     
  20. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    You're entitled to your opinion. It's on my topic.