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All three of my amps have buggered, in one night.

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Aaron Saunders, Aug 18, 2004.


  1. Aaron Saunders

    Aaron Saunders

    Apr 27, 2002
    Ontario
    I played a lot today through my Peavey Microbass. Knob didn't go past 2 or 3, and then I went and played Battlefield 1942 and talked to some friends. Plugged in my bass, no sound. If I held the cord in with one hand, sound would be produced normally. Clearly, however, this is unacceptable. So I sigh, say to myself "I'll just get it looked at on Saturday", and went out to grab my bigger Yorkville from the living room (it just stays there unplugged between band practices) to plug in. Same thing. I'm starting to get freaked out, here. I switch between both of my basses, and use both of my cords with each bass. Same thing. I try my Peavey Raptor 1 (guitar) through my little guitar combo. Same thing. Now, this is just a little suspicious, no?

    Figuring it might be the wiring to my room, I took my Microbass and tested it in the dining room and downstairs. SAME THING. I have NO idea what could've caused this -- I was playing my Microbass earlier today, the guitar amp yesterday, and at last check (a couple weeks ago) the Yorkville was fine -- and it was sitting unplugged! I thought about what might've caused this -- power surges, lightning strikes, etc. But it didn't rain today, and none of my other devices (plugged into the same outlet as my microbass and little combo) suffered from anything like a power surge. I have no idea what's wrong! :crying: Can anyone help?
     
  2. Rvl

    Rvl

    Dec 23, 2003
    Aomori Japan
    I dont mean to be smart......but did you try changing the cord?

    Thanks


    Robert VanLane
     
  3. Aaron Saunders

    Aaron Saunders

    Apr 27, 2002
    Ontario
    The patch? Yeah, I mentioned that I used both cords with both basses. I also (unmentioned) did use both cords with the guitar.

    The power cords on the amps are all non-removable, if that's what you meant.
     
  4. Rockbobmel

    Rockbobmel Supporting Member

    Lightning?
     
  5. wulf

    wulf

    Apr 11, 2002
    Oxford, UK
    You said "If I held the cord in with one hand, sound would be produced normally." Was that the case with both cords and all three amps?

    Wulf
     
  6. bigbeefdog

    bigbeefdog Who let the dogs in?

    Jul 7, 2003
    Mandeville, LA
    I assume the amps had some LED's.... did they come on?

    Are any other gizmos in your home malfunctioning?

    My only other thought is that your electric company could be having a (hopefully temporary) undervoltage problem, but it would likely be noticed in other devices.
     
  7. TheAmpNerd

    TheAmpNerd

    Apr 25, 2004
    Dallas, Texas
    Wondering?

    Are you using the same cab on these?

    If so, the first amp might have fried the speaker(s) in the cab...
    then anything else you plug in might do the same thing. Test the speaker cab with a 9 Volt battery...see if you get movement out of the speakers.

    Try a different cab with the 2nd amp.

    DO NOT USE the first amp until you get a tech to check it out.
    If the transistors fried in it, any cab you try to play it through
    will have their speaker voice coils fry in short order. Then you will have to pay for your friends speakers.

    You didn't specify whether amps 2, and 3 power up correctly
    or not.

    Good luck and keep us informed.
     
  8. bigbeefdog

    bigbeefdog Who let the dogs in?

    Jul 7, 2003
    Mandeville, LA
    Good thought, Nerd, but his Microbass is a combo. He also referred to his "little guitar combo". So I suspect it's not a single cab failure at the root of his problem.

    If my troubleshooting instincts are correct, he's tried multiple amps, multiple cabs, multiple basses and multiple cables. And although there was a moment when he held the cord in his hand, none of his attempts met with success. So it seems that his equipment is ruled out as the problem - they wouldn't all fail at once.

    Seems to me that this has to be a service/house wiring problem. It's the only thing common to all his tests.

    Govithoy, are you sure of the wiring in this house? If not, you can buy a ten-dollar gizmo at Radio Shack to test the wiring; I use one when I play in new and unusual places.

    I could be wrong, but I'd keep all my equipment unplugged and call the power co. and/or an electrician.
     
  9. The peavey microbass that I have had a problem where it would make a horrible crunching noise and you had to put pressure on the jack to make it work. After a while the amp had to come out of the box and be twisted a little. Finally it quit working altogether. Turns out it was the main power amp chip inside.

    The real mystery is why did all three quit at the same time? Have any/all of them been dropped at all? (unlikely if you dropped one they would all fail :) ) Again check for power LEDs, and if you have a meter check the AC coming out of the wall.

    AmpNerd - These are all combo amps. But if there is an extension speaker out on any of them ( I know the Microbass doesn't) use that too.
     
  10. Aaron Saunders

    Aaron Saunders

    Apr 27, 2002
    Ontario
    The power LEDs all came on. There is no ext. speaker for the Yorkville, but I don't know about the guitar amp -- but then again, I have no external cabs :p.

    The problem is the exact same with all three. None of my other electronic devices seem to be suffering -- computer performance is perfectly fine, TV's fine, microwave, oven, fridge, speakers (externally powered), etc., which is what really confuses me. I think it's pretty clear that all of my equipment just cannot up and stop working, so something's screwy with the wiring. I'm sure my dad has a circuit tester, so I'll talk to him when he gets home from work. Thanks a lot, fellas!
     
  11. McHack

    McHack

    Jul 29, 2003
    Central Ohio!
    Sounds like it might be something in your bass. It's a substantial coincidence to mess up all 3 amps, at one time.
     
  12. RunngDog

    RunngDog

    Jan 22, 2003
    Chicago, IL
    If it were me, I'd start with the hypothesis that's cheapest to fix: bad instrument cables (2 of them). Borrow a working, high-quality cable from someone and test your basses and amps again. This whole bit about "if I hold the cord with one hand it works fine" makes me very suspicious.
     
  13. bigbeefdog

    bigbeefdog Who let the dogs in?

    Jul 7, 2003
    Mandeville, LA
    Hmmm...... 2 cables going bad at the same time is very unlikely...... unless......

    Did you happen to store these cords together? In a place where they could have possibly gotten pinched, or puppy-chewed, simultaneously?
     
  14. McHack

    McHack

    Jul 29, 2003
    Central Ohio!
    I'm telling ya, you've got a ground issue in your bass...
     
  15. BillyB_from_LZ

    BillyB_from_LZ Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2000
    Chicago
    McHack...I believe that he had the same result with three different instruments...

    Govithoy...are your two cables the same brand (with the same plugs)? Try a cable of a different brand. Some 1/4 in. plugs are smaller than other 1/4 in. plugs (as odd as that may sound).

    Has anyone (a devilish friend) had access to your gear...could you have been Punk'd?
     
  16. McHack

    McHack

    Jul 29, 2003
    Central Ohio!
    AHHH,, oh, ok...

    I must've missed that, which is pretty common. I almost exclusively participate here, from work... Which means, I'm usually scanning... not reading in-depth.
     
  17. RunngDog

    RunngDog

    Jan 22, 2003
    Chicago, IL
    I'd agree, but it doesn't take much to loosen contacts on a cheap cord, and this guy wouldn't be the first person in the world to have a bad backup cord that he thought was okay and not even realize the problem until the cord he regularly uses went bad. I have lots of cords that work just fine as long as I hold them in a certain way -- they're called bad cords.
     
  18. That's right. I had a bad backup chord that I didn't know was bad until I played a bad G chord on my guitar (wrong key I guess) so I tried my backup chord (Em) and it was bad too. I have chords that work fine when you hold them a certain way -- they're called bar chords.:rolleyes: :D
     
  19. BillyB_from_LZ

    BillyB_from_LZ Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2000
    Chicago
    Hey, didn't anyone tell you that you can't play chords on a bass? ;)
     
  20. TheChariot

    TheChariot

    Jul 6, 2004
    Boston, MA
    Get Mad....

    Office Space...

    Printer....

    Smash...