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alternate neck shapes

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by taviswardlaw, Aug 30, 2005.


  1. Hi TBers,

    I'm looking at a fretless four project soon, and I have pretty big hands, so it can get kinda uncomfortable playing up on the g string because i have to scrunch my hands up alot. Now, from a luthiers point of view, would a 'wolfgang' style neck work on a bass like this and also, would it help for my problems? Any info form anyone who has done a neck job like this or used another neck shape to combat a similar problem would be great! Thanks :)

    P.S. - btw, the 'wolfgang' shape is kind of like a tear drop shaped neck, thinner at the E string and wider towards the G.
    You can see it at

    http://www.warmoth.com/guitar/necks/necks.cfm?fuseaction=back_profiles
     
  2. dpmasunder

    dpmasunder

    Apr 30, 2005
    'Straylya
    You can shape the back of the neck however you want. I can certainly see the appeal of the wolfgang shape. You may want to start off with symetrical version of that, which would be kind of EBMM-esque. You can keep working on the neck profile well after stringing the instrument up, especially if you give it an oil finish. Remember, if you make it too thick you can make it thinner, but if it's too thin to start with you can't make it thicker!
     
  3. Isn't it the deepest part of the neck offset toward the bass side and not the treble side on these necks? This is what I undestood, but I don't see an explanation on the Warmoth site.
     
  4. dpmasunder

    dpmasunder

    Apr 30, 2005
    'Straylya
    Agreed, that's what I've seen on similar necks, Geoff. Seems like it could work the other way too, particularly on fretless where you really want to be pressing directly down onto the board, any thoughts?
     
  5. Suburban

    Suburban

    Jan 15, 2001
    lower mid Sweden
    How's that? If you keep the thumb in the middle and pivot the hand around that, the problem is gone.
    Perhaps you should go more for the Clapton variant? I would.

    And, BTW, Geoff is right. The thick part is on the bass side.

    dpmasunder, however is wrong :p ;) . My first statement prevails! Has done for so for centuries, for guitars, violins, URBs, mandolins, you name it. They all teach the same tehcnique for tham all: thumb in the mibble of the neck back. :cool:
     
  6. dpmasunder

    dpmasunder

    Apr 30, 2005
    'Straylya
    That's gonna be awfully difficult on an 8-or-more-string ERB :p

    I actually kind of agree, my preference is for a symmetrical C-section kind of thing, but I've met some people who can't do that for whatever reason, be it 20 years of habit or physical limitations such as injury, so whatever works for the player, and if the player is also the builder then let the fun begin!
     
  7. the problem i have is actually much reduced when i DO move my thumb further towards the bass side of the neck because my hand isn't so 'compacted'. I just prefer to keep my thumb in the middle because it usually frees me up to play with more speed and/or inflection. :D but thanks for comments, I'll keep thinking...
     
  8. Suburban

    Suburban

    Jan 15, 2001
    lower mid Sweden
    Not with 5mm string spacing :spit:

    point acknowledged :D