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Am I getting crazy...?

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by Salamenster, Aug 14, 2012.


  1. Last Saturday I bought a new bass, Classic 70's J, great bass, great tones.

    The reason I bought it was the vivid tone it gave.

    But now, Tuesday, it seems like the really bright part of that vividness is gone!

    Do these stock Fender strings tend to do that? Or is it just me listening badly...? Maybe I need to check again tomorrow...

    Any opinions/experiences highly appreciated.
     
  2. By the way, the stock Fender strings, according to the site are:
    Fender® USA Super Bass 7250ML, NPS, (.045, .065, .080, .100 Gauges)

    Any toughts on great bright vivid strings (think Marcus Miller) that will last (relatively) long and are not a superspending?
     
  3. FunkMetalBass

    FunkMetalBass

    Aug 5, 2005
    Phoenix, Arizona 85029
    Endorsing Artist: J.C. Basses
    Marcus Miller uses DR's (in fact, I think he has a signature set), so you might consider those.

    I can't comment on longevity of the DR or Fender strings, however, having never owned a set from either manufacturer.
     
  4. stix_clgi

    stix_clgi Supporting Member

    Mar 4, 2008
    Accokeek, MD
    The Fat Beams from DR are Marcus Miller's signature set. I wouldn't say they are the brightest strings around, but they keep their tone for a while, and aren't very tight strings. They sound perfect on my Cirrus.
     
  5. recreate.me

    recreate.me

    Apr 2, 2010
    Ontario
    Probably is the strings... Not sure what you mean by 'vivid tone' . I do know that Dean Markley Blue Steels tend to be very bright and hold that tone for a couple months (for me at least i guess it depends on the number of hours you play it). I used to use them on my Jazz bass religiously when in a band, they cut through really well.
     
  6. I'll have look into those.
     
  7. Bump and update: I was mistaken. It was mostly the humidity of the air here playing tricks with my amp (I know it sound crazy, but it's true!). But now, exactly two months later, a lot of the highs of the strings are gone. Could be the fact that I have my EQ practically flat on all frequencies. Any toughts on this? Should I just fiddle around with my EQ compensating?

    Oh and I managed to get three sets 7250M's at discount and I have started building the denaturated alcohol bass strings cleaning tube. I only need the denatured alcohol itself to finish it and never have to buy strings again the coming three/four years hopefully...
     
  8. Jay2U

    Jay2U Not as bad as he lóòks

    Dec 7, 2010
    22 ft below sea level
    If you play a lot and like them bright with harmonics, two months may be the limit for these strings. Most of my string sets only last for 100 to 200 hours of playing. In my case this is ten weeks or less.

    About cleaning: I do this as well, but it's not only the gunk which makes them sound dull. It's also a matter of the material changing due to vibration under tension. A cleaned set lasts shorter. If they are just laying around for a while they also revive. I always keep used strings for backup. In case I install used ones, they always sound brighter than when they came off. I guess the material hardens and stretches during use under tension.
     
  9. Interesting point of view. Well, it was my idea to leave used strings in a closed, sealed box for a couple of days, then put them in the cleaning tube, and then again leave them in the box for when they're needed. With my recently purchased three sets I can set up a cycle of two used string sets and leave one unopened as a 'if really new rondwound tone is needed'-emergency kit.
     
  10. Jay2U

    Jay2U Not as bad as he lóòks

    Dec 7, 2010
    22 ft below sea level
    I always clean them first, since I see no reason to keep the dirt on. Once cleaned I store them coiled loosely in labelled paper bags in a wooden drawer in the living room. Wood regulates humidity, so there's no need to pack and seal those strings.
     
  11. SirMjac28

    SirMjac28 Patiently Waiting For The Next British Invasion Gold Supporting Member

    Aug 25, 2010
    The Great Midwest
    Jay2U that is some great advice thanks
     
  12. And another update: I was at my bass instructor's today, he has bought a new amp with a tweeter: BOOM! High's and sparkle all over. My combo doesn't have a tweeter, so I know a criterium for my next amp. xD

    Conclusion: My strings are far from dead yet.
     

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