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American vs Mexi P Bass

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by takdriver, Jul 23, 2012.


  1. takdriver

    takdriver

    Apr 15, 2012
    I have a Mexican P Bass from around 2006-2007 s/n. What kind of wood is it made from? I have put Seymour Duncan Antiquity II's in it, a Hipshot bridge, and Hipshot Tuners. Was a it a waste to mod a Mexican guitar this much rather than start with an American made model? Are the Americans made from better wood? Do they have better finishes? What are some honest opinions?
     
  2. PlungerModerno

    PlungerModerno

    Apr 12, 2012
    Ireland
    Modded guitars generally sacrifice value, esp. a refinish.

    If I had an MIA fender I'd leave it stock... maybe swap Pups at most.

    A good bass is good. It matters little where it comes from. There are big gaps between a CS fender and a standard squire.
     
  3. lpdeluxe

    lpdeluxe Still rockin'

    Nov 22, 2004
    Deep E Texas
    I interchangeably play a MIM Classic '50s with a Seymour Duncan Quarter Pound and an MIA AV '57. Both have TI Jazz Flats. The nitro finish is nicer on the AV, and the tuners stick sometimes on the Classic, and that's about it for the differences.

    Many of the wooden parts are made in Corona and finished in Ensenada, and perhaps the opposite is true.

    Other than the pickup change, I'll never do any mods to the MIM. The tuners (as I know from my CIJ Classic '51) will loosen up over time, and I know I'll never recover what I spend on upgrades.

    Both get played a lot, and I love 'em both.

    Poor photo:

    TwoPrecisions.
     
  4. I've had some very nice MIM P and J basses, usually older ones scooped up from Craigs List for $300 or less. It's fun to mod them, as parts are so readily available. Your mods are good ones, and I'm sure it's a fine playing bass. As for wood, alder seems to be the common denominator. Now, get some pickup and bridge covers, some vinyl bocks (see Masterbass) and maybe a tug bar and you're ready to go! Post pics when done
     

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