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American Words

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by DbNBassist, Oct 14, 2006.


  1. DbNBassist

    DbNBassist

    Aug 12, 2006
    Britain
    Ok, i am from the UK and i know that there are lots of differences in words, i know a few such as

    Pants - Trousers
    Egg Plant - Aubegine
    Couch - Sofa
    Bathroom - Toilet

    and so on

    i was just interested to here any purely "american" words, im interested.
     
  2. Bard2dbone

    Bard2dbone

    Aug 4, 2002
    Arlington TX
    Okay, but just 'cause it drove me nuts.

    A truck is not called a 'lorry' here.
    The place where the engine sits is under the hood.
    The big box built in to the back of the car is the trunk, not the boot.
    The place you rent to live in is your apartment, not a flat.
    The big box you ride upstairs in is an elevator, not a lift.

    And drive on the right hand side of the road, for Pete's sake.

    :p .
     
  3. DbNBassist

    DbNBassist

    Aug 12, 2006
    Britain
    and because the guy above was saying "is not" the whole time, might i point something out

    WE INVENTED THE LANGUAGE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  4. brothernewt

    brothernewt Some people call me the stormtrooper of love...

    Apr 13, 2004
    Happyrock, OR
    Nothing to add, but enjoying the thread so far. and "Aubegine"???? I'd never have known what that was if it wasn't spelled out. The others mostly still make sense in American English.
     
  5. trog

    trog

    Nov 8, 2003
    Scotland
    Could someone explain what 'biscuit' means in the USA? Over here I reckon it's what you would call a cookie.
     
  6. Toasted

    Toasted

    May 26, 2003
    Leeds, UK
    Or, a nice lady bottom. "Mmmm buscuit"
     
  7. No that would be a cookie.

    this explains it pretty ok.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biscuit
     
  8. zazz

    zazz

    Feb 27, 2004
    Cebu
    just try going up to someone and asking

    ...."do you know where i can bum some fags round here mate??"

    ...roughly translated ..."where can i purchase some cigarettes ??"
     
  9. anonymous278347457

    anonymous278347457 Guest

    Feb 12, 2005
    I still dont understand why americans call stuff "neat".

    I mean when I think neat I think tidy and ordered
     
  10. DbNBassist

    DbNBassist

    Aug 12, 2006
    Britain
    Yah, its pronounced oh-ber-jean
     
  11. zazz

    zazz

    Feb 27, 2004
    Cebu
    the same way as neat is sweet is cool is hip is happening is da bomb..is..... i think the americans are trying to increase their vocabulary.;)
     
  12. Indiana Mike

    Indiana Mike Supporting Member

    Nov 18, 2005
    American football

    [​IMG]

    Yours
    [​IMG]
     
  13. Baryonyx

    Baryonyx Inactive

    Jul 11, 2005
    Marathon Man
    In England, your girlfriend is not your "girl", "bitch" or "ho", she's your bird!
     
  14. If you used the word "counterpane" an American would have no clue what you're talking about. Here it's a bedspread or quilt.
     
  15. Tsal

    Tsal

    Jan 28, 2000
    Finland

    Fixed it for you ;)
     
  16. Mike N

    Mike N Missing the old TB Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jan 28, 2001
    Spencerport, New York
    And we perfected it.
     
  17. Blackbird

    Blackbird Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2000
    California
    In the U.S.,

    A holiday is called a vacation,
    A tap is called a faucet.
    The pavement is called a sidewalk
    A drugstore is called a pharmacy
    drugstores sell not just medicine, but many everyday houshold items.
     
  18. tplyons

    tplyons

    Apr 6, 2003
    Madison, NJ
    Potato crisps in the UK are potato chips here.
    Chips there are French Fries here.

    Trying to recall others from my four years in the UK.
     
  19. Check your history. If by "we", you mean inhabitants of the British Isles, you're a bit wrong.

    Mike
     
  20. anderbass

    anderbass

    Dec 20, 2005
    Phoenix. Az.
    While reading a book by a British writer, I noticed the term "anyroad" used.
    In the USA, we would use the term "anyway", "in any case" or "anyhow".

    In the USA we would only use the term "cheers", as a abbreviated toast,
    before drinking an alcoholic beverage.
     
  21. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
    Jan 19, 2021

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