Ampeg 4x10HLF Wattage???

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by 74rickbass, Sep 5, 2003.

  1. On the site, it says 400 RMS power handling, but there is one at my local music store, and on the back it says "250RMS/1000 Program", and yes, I'm positive it's the 4x10HLF cause it says it on the back. and ampeg only produces one 4x10 with a rollbar and the ports on the front.

    What do you think? missprint???
  2. tim4003


    Apr 30, 2002
    Dawsonville , GA
    SVT or BSE? I think you may be seeing two different cabs.
  3. no, SVT classic, black grill, rollbar and all...

  4. tim4003


    Apr 30, 2002
    Dawsonville , GA
    That's strange. Could be a misprint. That "250RMS/1000Program" doesn't look right either.
  5. Cantstandsya


    Jul 27, 2001
    Fontana, CA
    I used to have one.Mine said it was 500 Watts RMS/1000 Watts Program
  6. The weird thing is, on the cab I seen, it has 250watts RMS, on the website, it says 400 watts RMS, AND in the ampeg paper thing it says 500 watts RMS, whats the deal???

    Should I send a E-mail to the company to find out?
  7. Gard

    Gard Commercial User

    Mar 31, 2000
    Greensboro, NC, USA
    General Manager, Roscoe Guitars
    Here is the exact wording of the Ampeg lit we use at work:

    Four 10" speakers (front ported) and horn, extended low end, 800 watt handling, 4 ohms, variable "L" pad, 3" dolly-style casters, tilt-back handle.

    We don't have one on display right at the moment, so I can't check the back panel for the exact wording there.
  8. The 250W thing is an error. The older HLFs were rated at 400/800 and the newer ones are rated 500/1000.
  9. I was thinking maybe, it was 250 watts Continuous, 500 watts RMS, and 1000 watts program?

    Does that sound about right? cause someone told me that if you double the continuous wattage, you get the RMS, and if you double the the RMS, you get the program wattage. is that true?
  10. Can anybody clearify if the above statement is true?
  11. 'RMS' is continuous power. It's actually an incorrect term. The correct term for what people call 'RMS' is 'continuous average power.'
    It's calculated from the RMS voltage across the terminals of the cab, and I guess people use the RMS term for power because it's convenient.
    There isn't any standard definition for 'program' power but a lot of manufacturers spec it as 2x continuous (RMS).
    The long term continuous power handling (ie RMS) is the only number you need to consider when it comes to power ratings.