Dismiss Notice

Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

Ampeg 8x10 question.

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by razorbakc, Mar 16, 2004.


  1. razorbakc

    razorbakc

    Feb 3, 2002
    I bought a new Ampeg 8x10 cabinet a little while ago and whenever I hit the E string, which is tuned down to a D, the volume starts off really low for a second and then comes up to full volume. Is this normal and why is it doing this?

    And for a second question. The amp I am using is the Ampeg B2R. It sounds pretty good and is fairly loud, but I want more. I'm thinking of buying a power amp to add to my rack. I want to bring the 350 watts from the B2R up to at least 500. So, whats a good power amp that will give me around 150-200 more watts and is fairly inexpensive?
     
  2. if you only wanna bring it up that much, a Carvin DCM1000 would be great....they are VERY WELL BUILT,solid tone,and have the options of many other higher priced power amps...

    I just ordered a DCM1500 to power my rig.
     
  3. brianrost

    brianrost Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 26, 2000
    Boston, Taxachusetts
    Are you using the limiter in your B2R? Turn it off and see if that fixes the problem.
     
  4. razorbakc

    razorbakc

    Feb 3, 2002
    I use the limiter pretty much just for practices, but it doesn't seem to have any effect on that.
     
  5. brianrost

    brianrost Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 26, 2000
    Boston, Taxachusetts
    I'm sure the problem is your amp, not the cabinet but not sure what it could be.

    I would also advise going way beyond 500 watts. Remember that doubling wattage only gives you 3dB more level; my advice is that if you feel underpowered to go for FOUR times the wattage, in your case 1000-1500 watts.

    You can buy power amps in that range for $3-400 these days.
     
  6. razorbakc

    razorbakc

    Feb 3, 2002
    I think four times is way too much. I don't even know if the cab could handle that much.
    While we're on the topic though, what does the different listing of wattages mean? Like it say 800 watts RMS, and 1,600 program.
     
  7. Four times is not "way too much", it just means you have headroom to spare. Remember, the volume knob does not always have to be maxed out.
     
  8. razorbakc

    razorbakc

    Feb 3, 2002
    Ok, even though it may not be 'way too much' I don't want the possibility of blowing the speakers if, for some reason it got turned up too loud by me or someone else. I don't want to just throw away all the money i just spent.
     
  9. Phat Ham

    Phat Ham

    Feb 13, 2000
    DC
    RMS stands for root mean square. It's basically the standard way to measure continuous power, although with speakers I think calling it RMS is technically incorrect. Don't worry about technicalities though, The RMS or continuous rating is the only rating you should worry about. You will also see peak power ratings, which is the maximum instantaneous power handling capability. This is the amount of power that the speaker can handle for a split second. I don't find this number very useful. The program rating is a made up number that marketing people use to make it sound like their cab has better specs. A lot of times it is just double the RMS power. I suppose it is the manufacturer's suggested safe power to use when you are playing program material (i.e. music).
     
  10. razorbakc

    razorbakc

    Feb 3, 2002
    So, that means I can pretty much get up to 800 watts and be safe?
     
  11. My big rig includes and ampeg 810E. I run a mackie 1400i bridged @ 4ohm into it. 1400W. I never crank it all the way, but there's plenty of room to move. I'd much rather have double the power a cab can take, than half the power it can handle. Headroom is key.
     
  12. brianrost

    brianrost Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 26, 2000
    Boston, Taxachusetts
    When I suggested going over 1000 watts, I was just pointing out that going from 350 to 500 watts will not seem to be much of a volume increase. If more volume is what you're after, there's no sense blowing lots of $$$ and not getting it.

    My personal experience after many years is that if you are using the same speakers and just swapping out the amp head you really need to go to four times the wattage to sound "a lot" louder.
     
  13. razorbakc

    razorbakc

    Feb 3, 2002
    I don't necessarily want it 'a lot' louder. Its more, I guess, I just want that extra power. And also I think that more power would eliminate the low volume that the lower notes start off at.
     
  14. atldeadhead

    atldeadhead

    Jun 17, 2002
    Georgia
    I doubt it's the power issue. I've had an 8x10 and an Ampeg 200T (solid state amp. 200 watts @ 8ohms/350 @ 4ohms) for years. The 200T puts out 350 watts into the 4ohm 8x10. Even when I push the amp to clipping there is no noticeable decrease in volume. Yes, more power will give you more clean headroom and prevent your amp from clipping but I don't think your current amp's power rating has anything to do with the volume dropping out on you. I also tune down to D on occasion and use a 5 string modulus. There might be something else wrong with the amp. Can you test the amp with another speaker cabinet? If you still have the same problem then you'll know for sure that it's the amp.

    FYI, moving more air is what results in a more noticeable difference in volume. Your pushing 8 speakers. You should have plenty of volume.
     
  15. razorbakc

    razorbakc

    Feb 3, 2002
    How do you tell if the speakers are busted?
    I really don't think that they are, but when I turn the volume to the higher levels I can hear a rattling or buzzing type of sound in the speakers. I'm pretty sure my amp couldn't bust the speakers since it doesn't produce half of the handling of the cab. But in the store it was hooked up to an SVT-III pro.
    Maybe I am just being paranoid because I just spent a lot of money.