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Ampeg SVT4 Pro Vs. Mesa Basis M2000

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Ryan L., Sep 4, 2004.


  1. Ryan L.

    Ryan L. Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Aug 7, 2000
    West Fargo, ND
    Ok, I know these "this vs. that" threads can get to be a bit much, but since I won't get a chance to A/B these heads together, I am looking for a little input for those of you who have played both or had some sort of experience with both.

    I have been playing through an SVT4 Pro for about 3-4 years now, and I am just looking for something different. I thought about getting another SWR SM900, but when I had one before my Ampeg, I always thought it was a bit sterile sounding--not a bad thing in some applications mind you, and maybe with more tweaking it wouldn't worked for me. I have also been considering Eden, but it's been so long since I tried one of their heads, I don't even remember why I didn't buy one (musta been a reason, though ;) ).

    So, that leaves me thinking about a Mesa M2000. One of my main questions is about the tones--can they do both the grittier Ampeg type sound, and also the more hi-fi SWRish sound?? And are they fairly reliable (I know, I know, anything can break down.) I just want to know if they have a history of problems. Any other info I can get on these would be great, especially from people who have owned/own them.

    Thanks
    Ryan
     
  2. Ryan L.

    Ryan L. Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Aug 7, 2000
    West Fargo, ND
  3. Ozzyman

    Ozzyman

    Jul 21, 2004
    How much are you selling your SVT4 for?
     
  4. Benjamin Strange

    Benjamin Strange Commercial User

    Dec 25, 2002
    New Orleans, LA
    Owner / Tech: Strange Guitarworks
    I would hesitate to say that the M2000 is a hi-fi sounding head. It's pretty aggressive, and kind of thick sounding. It's definitely not an SWR.
     
  5. Ryan L.

    Ryan L. Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Aug 7, 2000
    West Fargo, ND
    I am not necessarily looking for a hi-fi sounding head, I guess I am more curious about what these heads are capable of producing as far as tones/sounds go. I like a more aggressive tone, so that is a good thing if they'll do that. I have read that they really aren't a "plug and play" amp and require quite a bit of playing around with the EQ to get them set where you want them, which is fine with me. I would really like to know just what they will do, though. And there is still the reliability question, also.

    Thanks
    Ryan
     
  6. natrab

    natrab

    Dec 9, 2003
    Bay Area, CA
    The M-2000 takes a little more tweaking, but I find it's the most versitile amp I've ever owned. On the tube side, you can get gritty, overdriven sounds as well as a fat tube sound, then at the drop of a dime (or a footswitch) you can be on a sweet ss dub sound on the other channel. That's how I have mine set up at least. I'm about to sell my Bass 400+ so I can buy a second M-2000 because I realize that it's the amp of my dreams. I'll still have my D-180 for that tube sound.

    Anyways, I'd say go with the M-2000 if you're looking for something to cover all the ranges. While it may not be the best at each sound, it certainly sounds good (I'd probably take a tube amp over the tube side of the M-2000 for recording). For live situations this is the greatest amp ever.
     
  7. Benjamin Strange

    Benjamin Strange Commercial User

    Dec 25, 2002
    New Orleans, LA
    Owner / Tech: Strange Guitarworks
    Actually, it can be a very easy plug and play amp if that's what you want it to be. People assume that since there's lots of knobs and switches, they need to tweak all of them. Want an easy, tubey tone? Plug in bass. Turn on amp. Set to tube preamp. Set treble at 11, mid at 1, bass at 2. Done!

    I use mine without the graphic EQ about 90% of the time. I have my graphics set up to automatically kick in when I blend the channels - mids boosted on the tube side, smiley face EQ on the FET side. All in all it's and easy amp to learn how to use; there's alot of redundant controls, just like a mixer.
     
  8. Tritone

    Tritone Supporting Member

    Jan 24, 2002
    Santee, America
    I'd pipe in here,but...........

    :D
     
  9. Benjamin Strange

    Benjamin Strange Commercial User

    Dec 25, 2002
    New Orleans, LA
    Owner / Tech: Strange Guitarworks
    But what? :confused:
     
  10. Tritone

    Tritone Supporting Member

    Jan 24, 2002
    Santee, America
    Check out the For Sale forum.

    Don't want to sound too obvious, ya know!

    :D
     
  11. lo-freq

    lo-freq aka UFO

    Jan 19, 2003
    The Republic of Texas
    I'll present another very simple but effective approach to tweaking the M-2000.

    Set everything flat tone-wise, set the preamp switch to 'mix' mode and use the balance to dial in the tubey-ness (or lack of) that you desire (no OD).
    I prefer mostly SS on most stuff -- tight, fast, but still very warm tone.

    I still wish I had one or two of these...
     
  12. Tritone

    Tritone Supporting Member

    Jan 24, 2002
    Santee, America
    OK, I can't resist....

    I agree with everything that's been said so far. I set mine up essentially like a 3 channel amp:

    Solid State Channel= Finger style
    Tube Channel= Slap
    Mix Mode = Effect Channel

    Pretty much any sound you want is inside the thing, you just have to spend the time to get to know the amp. It's definitely not a "plug and play" venture, although it's pretty simple to dial in a usable sound to start. You can download the manual off of Boogie's site, it's pretty extensive and will give you an idea of what the amp is capable of. The only reason I'm selling mine, is that I'm trying to save my back by going with lighter equipment (namely Thunderfunk and WBS cabinets). I'm keeping one for sentimental reasons though....
     
  13. Dennis Kong

    Dennis Kong Supporting Member

    Sep 1, 2004
    San Mateo CA
    M2000 was recommended to me by Ken Lawerence ( the
    bass maker in Arcata Ca ) in the 90's. When they first came out they had some bugs in them but since then Mesa has fixed them and I have not had any problems since then too.
    It's a very versatile amp but requires tweeking. And solid state
    side is similar to the W Woods.
    Some of my weekend gigs (jazz) require both upright bass n fretted electric bass so I use the M2000 for it. The tube side is set up for the upright bass and the solid state is set up for
    the 5 string electric (low B). (funk & rock). (my taste)
    The great thing is I don't have to mess with different eq's for
    both instruments. I just rotate the mix pot to either side depending the instrument. I owned mine for 7 years.
     
  14. Ryan L.

    Ryan L. Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Aug 7, 2000
    West Fargo, ND
    Thanks for the replies. It sounds to me like it should pretty much do anything I would want it to. It'll be used for live purposes, I don't foresee ever having it in the studio, so that was my main concern. The studio I have been going to has me covered as far as preamps go.

    Thanks again
    Ryan
     
  15. Ryan L.

    Ryan L. Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Aug 7, 2000
    West Fargo, ND

    :D :D ;)
     
  16. Ncognito

    Ncognito Banned Commercial User

    Jan 8, 2002
    Hoffman Estates, Illinois
    Owner, Xsonics Bass Cabinets
    Hey Ryan

    I've used an Ampeg SVT-4 Pro since 1997, and still do today. I bought an M-2000 a few years ago, and could never get a good tone from it. Also found it way underpowered for my uses. I recently got a Mesa Big Block 750. Different story here. Almost everything sounds good coming from it. Still a little power shy for me, but a huge improvement from the M-2000, IMO.

    Good luck.
     
  17. Ryan L.

    Ryan L. Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Aug 7, 2000
    West Fargo, ND

    What size/kind of cabs were you running it through, just out of curiosity?

    I would be running it through an Ampeg SVT410HLF for now, and I am not in need of huge volume onstage, I rarely ever turn the master on my 4 Pro past the 12 o'clock mark.

    I am undecided on whether or not I will keep my Ampeg cab or not, or if I will end up switching brands of cabs also. I do know that I will stick with 410's though, regardless of brand.

    Thanks
    Ryan
     
  18. Ncognito

    Ncognito Banned Commercial User

    Jan 8, 2002
    Hoffman Estates, Illinois
    Owner, Xsonics Bass Cabinets
    Ryan

    I use an Eden 410XLT and love it. I've tried many cabinets, but always come back to the 410XLT.
     
  19. Ryan L.

    Ryan L. Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Aug 7, 2000
    West Fargo, ND

    It seemed underpowered for an Eden 410???
     
  20. Ncognito

    Ncognito Banned Commercial User

    Jan 8, 2002
    Hoffman Estates, Illinois
    Owner, Xsonics Bass Cabinets
    My Edens are 8 ohm models, and yes it was way underpowered. No headroom left.