1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  

Anchoring

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by Trotsky, Sep 4, 2008.


  1. Trotsky

    Trotsky

    Sep 3, 2008
    Montreal
    Hi All!

    Just got a 5 strings bass. Used to play a 4 strings several years ago. Since I'm back and new to the BEADG, I was wondering about muting my strings with my right hand.

    I like a clean sound, When I'm playing the B, my thumb is on the pick-up, then it goes on the B when I play on the E, on the E and muting the B while playing on the A.

    But, when I play the D or G string, my thumb is on the A string muting also the E and B with the side of the thumb.

    Is this the proper way to mute a 5 strings with your right hand (if your right handed of course...)? I would love to have your inputs or sugestions on that matter.

    Thank you in advance for your replies!

    Trotsky
     
  2. DanielleMuscato

    DanielleMuscato

    Jun 19, 2004
    Columbia, Missouri, USA
    Endorsing Artist, Schroeder Cabinets
    Presuming you mean that you drape your thumb, that's called floating thumb technique and is one of the textbook ways to alleviate excessive ring & string noise when playing an extended range bass.

    Do you actually anchor (tip of thumb, with thumb bent out/backwards), or just mute the string with your edge of your thumb (thumb straight, hanging loose)?
     
  3. Letting you thump drape over the strings makes for a great mute. My suggestion is to learn to mute using the fretting hand also
     
  4. Trotsky

    Trotsky

    Sep 3, 2008
    Montreal

    Answer:

    I've been reading through the data bass and it is indeed the "floating thumb technique".

    If I'm playing something on the G string, the tip of my thumb will be on the A string (playing fingerstyle of course) pointing toward the neck and muting the other two top strings, B & E, with the side of my thumb. My thumb will go up one string (E) after if I play on the A string. It's an up and down motion to, like you mention, "alleviate excessive ring & string noise".

    I'm just not sure if I should go down to the A string (on a 5 strings) bass with my thumb, although, it seems to make sense.

    T.
     
  5. Trotsky

    Trotsky

    Sep 3, 2008
    Montreal

    Answer:

    Yes, I also use my left hand (fretting hand) at the same time to mute when I'm going up (toward the B string).

    Trotsky
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.