Any guesses what this is?

Discussion in 'Basses [DB]' started by FunkySpoo, Nov 14, 2003.

  1. FunkySpoo

    FunkySpoo Supporting Member

    Feb 6, 2002
  2. I don't know what it is but this made me laugh.
  3. Looks like the endpin needs adjustment.
  4. FunkySpoo

    FunkySpoo Supporting Member

    Feb 6, 2002
    Or maybe some elevator shoes
  5. olivier


    Dec 17, 1999
    Paris, France
    Don't you guys know that back in the 50's German chubby teenagers were shorter ?
  6. FunkySpoo

    FunkySpoo Supporting Member

    Feb 6, 2002
    Hmmmm, I was kinda hoping to get a serious answer. So I'm guessing that nobody has information or a guess as to what this might be beyond the discription on the site
  7. olivier


    Dec 17, 1999
    Paris, France
    Ricky: who wants to take guesses on photos like these.

    Most important questions: Does it sound good? Is it well setup? Is it in good shape?

    The rest is not that important. Why they take a kid to hold it? Is there a size problem? It's a moderately ugly plybass. Looks very new for something from the fifties... and I don't know about a german bass factory that would proudly stick a "made in US zone" label inside their instruments! But I am not sure. The bass looks newer to me. Yes it does not APPEAR to be in too bad a condition. I bet it's fairly light. For half that price it might be interesting as a study instrument. Don't buy this type of thing on the net. And don't try to sell them or we gonna make fun of you! Before buying you should be able to try the DB, show it to someone that knows, and make shure you have a trial period of one or two weeks.
  8. mje


    Aug 1, 2002
    Southeast Michigan
    When I see a bass that old in condition that good, I assume that either (1) it's been in a basement for years, unplayed or (2) it sounds so bad no one would play it ;-)

    Elderly is a great place for most instruments but I've never seen a great bass there. Still, you never know.
  9. FunkySpoo

    FunkySpoo Supporting Member

    Feb 6, 2002
    I agree. That bass just seems too new to be 50 years old. They also have a Shen plywood that I gather from many posts here on TB is the cream of the crop in the newer Chinese basses.
  10. They may not have been too proud about it, but for a while after the war they did label them that way. It was probably required in order for them to export to the US. Country of origin has been required on imported instruments to US since about 1910.
  11. John Sprague

    John Sprague Sam Shen's US Distributor

    Mar 10, 2003
    Rochester, NY
    Sales Manager, CSC Products Inc.
    I believe that Elderly instruments, in recognition of the fact that the violin family isn't their best area of expertise, has a few local luthiers who stock the store for them. That way, the quality is hitting the shelves, and these same luthiers back up those instruments by servicing them. So I'm inclined to think you're in good shape buying there.

    And if you're in the market to spend high-5 to 6 figures on a vintage Martin guitar, then there are few other places to go in the US. I hear that 75% of their business is from out of town, selling vintage git's and such. That's a big number!
  12. Monte


    Jan 9, 2001
    New Albany, MS
    Yo John,

    Have you ever been to Byron Berline's place (Doublestop Fiddle Shop) in Guthrie, OK? You should take a trip out there and try to talk him into stocking basses other than the Crapatinos or Cremhorribles that were in there.

    Pisses me off to go in there and see nice old Italian violins, vintage Martins, and Mandolins that cost almost as much as my bass with 2 junky basses as an afterthought.

    For some reason, the bluegrass world seems to think junk is acceptable in basses. Probably because Kay has been the bass of choice for so many years.

  13. originally posted by Monte:
    "vintage Martins, and Mandolins that cost almost as much as my bass with 2 junky basses as an afterthought."

    Yeah, my bluegrass player friend plays a 6.000 $ Gilchrist mandolin!