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Any know anything about meteorites?

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by PolkaHero, Mar 3, 2003.


  1. PolkaHero

    PolkaHero Supporting Member

    Jan 5, 2002
    Michigan
    Heard on the radio today that some guy got a million dollars(!) for a meteorite he discovered. I happen to have a 24 pound meteorite that my grandfather discovered in a field about 50 years ago. It's black with jagged edges all around it. Anybody know what it might be worth?
     
  2. Matt Till

    Matt Till

    Jun 1, 2002
    Edinboro, PA
    Did someone say Mooninites? :D


    Oh, I guess not.
     
  3. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    If it's a metal meteorite, it could be worth several thousand dollars an ounce. DO NOT sell it without having a reputable scientist appraise it. Metal meteorites are not just collectible novelties. They are VERY valuable for research purposes. It's worth checking out.

    If it's a stony meteorite, it's probabley worth a lot less, and may hold most of its value as a collectible.

    I am not an authority on meteorites, but as a geologist, I've read about this stuff. Definitely check it out.

    Here's a link to an example.

    Meteorite for Sale
     
  4. DigMe

    DigMe

    Aug 10, 2002
    Waco, TX
    Get away! Haven't you seen the movies?? Didn't you watch X-Files? The thing is bound to have killer alien spores or some kind of cranky, black oil in it. Flee!!

    brad cook
     
  5. Matt Till

    Matt Till

    Jun 1, 2002
    Edinboro, PA

    Or Creepshow I
     
  6. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    :D
     
  7. Paul A

    Paul A

    Dec 13, 1999
    Hertfordshire U.K!
    Some meteorites are worth enormous amounts of money.
    Tektites, which are often passed off as meteorites don't have the same kind of value, but none the less are reasonably valuable.
    Tektites are Silica "Glass" which DO often have jagged edges, they are formed when a meteorite hits the earth and material from the ground is "vaporised" and thrown high into the atmosphere where it cools and solidifies and falls back to earth.
    Have it examined by a good reputable source, a local university may be able to help.
    Good Luck!
     
  8. I remember collecting tectites out on the salt flats when I was a little kid. Little black glassy ones.

    Yes, but when the thing lands its not just a matter of gently touching down, the thing smashes into the earth at terminal velocity - which for alump of rock is pretty high. Plenty of energy to create jagged edges on impact.
     
  9. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Terminal velocity is the same for everything isn't it? Or have I just had a brain fart?
     
  10. thrash_jazz

    thrash_jazz

    Jan 11, 2002
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Artist: JAF Basses, Circle K Strings
    Yes, the velocity is the same, but a massive rock will have a helluva lot more momentum than, say, a person.

    As for your meteorite, it depends on what it's made of. I'd imagine the million-dollar meteorite would have to be made of something pretty rare.
     
  11. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Ahhh ok, gotcha.
     
  12. Johnny BoomBoom

    Johnny BoomBoom Supporting Member

    Jun 8, 2001
    Glasgow, Scotland

    Actually terminal velocity is different for everything! Acceleration due to gravity is the same for everything though. Terminal velocity is given by many factors - drag etc!

    If memory serves, no metoerite has been noted travelling at less than 27,000mph. The human body typically has a terminal velocity of 120mph.

    But, once affected by earth's gravity, the pull on both would be the same!
     
  13. FunkySpoo

    FunkySpoo Supporting Member

    Feb 6, 2002
    Right, even though the gravitational pull is equal, a feather and a bowling ball fall to the ground at different speeds
     
  14. thrash_jazz

    thrash_jazz

    Jan 11, 2002
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Artist: JAF Basses, Circle K Strings
    Oops. My bad, Johnny is correct!

    Anyone recall how to work that out? I can't remember my air resistance formulas!
     
  15. Johnny BoomBoom

    Johnny BoomBoom Supporting Member

    Jun 8, 2001
    Glasgow, Scotland

    No worries. :)


    And no, I have no idea how to work it all out - long time since I used my physics.:eek:
     
  16. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Oh.

    So I did have a brain fart then :D
     
  17. a meteorite is when it is flying and a meteoroid is when it hits the ground.
     
  18. And a metroid is a evil power sucking monster!
     
  19. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    Mmmmmmnope. The terminal velocity will be a function of the object's cross-sectional area, shape, and mass. In a vacuum in a gravitational field, the acceleration is the same for everything and there is no terminal velocity. A feather accelerates and falls as fast as a ball bearing. In air, however, you will notice that the ball bearing falls MUCH faster than the feather. That's because the mass of the feather is insufficient to overcome the aerodynamic drag presented by its comparatively large cross-sectional area and un-aerodynamic shape. The ball bearing, on the other hand, has a much lower drag coefficient, and accelerates faster and has a much higher terminal velocity than the feather.

    If the terminal velocity was the same for everything, there wouldn't be much point in a skydiver deploying his parachute, would there?
     
  20. heh heh...

    thatd be cool.

    no parachute heh.

    ...heh.