Anybody own or ever play a fanned fret bass?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by rob_d, Oct 1, 2005.

  1. rob_d


    Jun 14, 2001
    Dingwall is the main one that I know makes these, but I've yet to try one. Looks kind of strange at first glance, but after looking closer it seems to make sense. The frets seem to "tilt" with your wrist as it goes up and down the fretboard causing less stress on the wrist. Probably would take some getting used to though.

  2. I actually played a dingwall (5 string) today...most excellent bass, made sense, tapping was al ittle hard on the 22-24 fret area.

    JAUQO III-X Banned

    Jan 4, 2002
    Endorsing artist:see profile.
    I own a 6 string Dingwall(the 4th one Sheldon made)and it plays very nicely and overall the tone is very versatile with a killer B.It can go from a killer smooth thickness to the snappiest of modern tones to every thing in between.
  4. spiritbass

    spiritbass Supporting Member

    Jun 9, 2004
    Ashland, MO
    I'm looking forward to playing my indigoburst alder AB-1 in November :bassist:
  5. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    I have played a couple of Dingwall Afterburners and an ABII. Most excellent basses, and very easy to get used to.
  6. Fawkes007


    Sep 13, 2005
    SF Bay Area
    Played one once. At first a tad daunting, but it takes seconds to get the feel down. Fanned frets are no biggie, though depending on where you are on the fingerboard certain technicques can be a little tricky.

    The Dingies are very well made and sound great, and they are gorgeous. The string tension due to the fanned frets and scale length is almost the best of both worlds (let's face it, a 35 inch scale length for the D and G strings is TOO tight).
  7. Hey rob-
    there are a handfull of fanned fret bass owners on talkbass (check out my avatar). Primarily Dingwall owners, but also basses made by Conklin, Bee and Arcadia.
    Yes, I have played many fanned fret basses, I own a few as well. That said, the fanned frets take NO time getting used to (it will take you longer to read this thread than feel comfortable on the fanned frets). The fanning is purely a visual distraction.
    Your correct about the wrist angle and thats a side benefit, but in all honesty the fanning improves playability, tone, evens the string tension and importantly allows each string to speak at its proper length. There is NO downside to fanned fretboard, except trying to find someone to make one for you.
    I even have a fanned fretless just because of the amazing benefits you get w/ the multiscale fingerboard.

    If your a fan of Sheldon Dingwalls work he has a forum located at his website, go an check out whats going on in the fanned world