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Anybody used the Aphex Acoustic Exciter 1401 for Double Bass?

Discussion in 'Amps, Mics & Pickups [DB]' started by Bruce Lindfield, Sep 16, 2003.


  1. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I noticed that in an ad in BP magazine - they featured a DB player endorsing this pedal and wondered if anybody had tried this yet - what it was like? Did it add any noise - do you think it would be useful for EUB etc.

    Aphex are a respected name in the industry at the quality end - but these pedals are fairly "affordable" - cheap imitations or the real thing?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I just found the picture I was referring to - it was Reggie Hamilton :

    [​IMG]
     
  3. godoze

    godoze

    Oct 21, 2002
    Bruce, I ordered one yesterday to go with the new EUB that i just ordered.

    I should have it in a day or two and will post a review.


    D
     
  4. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    That's great - thanks, I'll look forward to hearing about it! :)
     
  5. godoze

    godoze

    Oct 21, 2002
    Bruce, are you thinking
    about one for EUB or DB ?
     
  6. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I don't have a DB - only an NSCR5 with piezos only. I was thinking it might be useful when I have to plug into other amps than my own and just generally might add to the 'acoustic' sound of the EUB?

    I've seen them on sale (mail order) for about £115 - which seems pretty cheap to me!
     
  7. Monte

    Monte

    Jan 9, 2001
    New Albany, MS
    Pardon me for being a curmedgeon, but just how is an electronic effects box gonna simulate the air that an acoustic instrument makes?

    I'll believe it when I hear it I guess.

    Monte
     
  8. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I dunno - ask Reggie Hamilton? ;)
     
  9. Monte

    Monte

    Jan 9, 2001
    New Albany, MS
    Hmm, upon looking him up on All Music, I see he was the bassist for Boyz 2 Men, Mariah Carey, Jon B., and Tony Braxton. I'm sure he is a good bassist to get that kind of work, but unless I see someone like Dr. Art Davis recommending it, I reserve my right to be skeptical.:D
     
  10. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    From the Aphex website :

    Reggie Hamilton
    Who does Stanley Clarke call when he needs a bass player? Reggie Hamilton. Reggie is a triple threat,he plays electric, upright, and keyboard bass, he has worked his way into the elite group of L.A.'s top studio bassists. In addition to his numerous film credits, Hamilton has recorded with Barbra Streisand, Toni Braxton, Aaron Neville, and Michael Bolton, and Babyface just to name the short list..


    But you're probably right Monte!! ;)
     
  11. Sam Sherry

    Sam Sherry Inadvertent Microtonalist Supporting Member

    Sep 26, 2001
    Portland, ME
    Euphonic Audio "Player"
  12. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    This is why we need TB - so we aren't fooled by ads in Bass Player etc. :)
     
  13. brianrost

    brianrost Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 26, 2000
    Boston, Taxachusetts
    Monte, perhaps you're confused.

    It doesn't "simulate" an acoustic sound, it's a box that adds harmonic content to the original signal to make the amplified sound seem to have more presence and depth without using EQ to do so (thus not needing any more wattage to give a beefier low end).

    Aphex processors have been in heavy use in studios since the late 70s. The original Aphex exciters acted on the highs only, they added a "big bottom" low end processing feature about a decade ago. The stomp boxes offer (supposedly) the same circuit in a low cost mono unit with a DI capability.

    Basically it's a fancy band-aid that is supposed to make any audio system sound better than it really is. They do work, to some extent. Cranking the processing up too high makes the sound annoying to listen to. The better your audio path, the less improvement the exciter can give you.

    Here's a link to an online review of the Aphex 204 rtack unit that may help you understand what these things can do:
    http://www.aphex.com/buzz.cfm
     
  14. Monte

    Monte

    Jan 9, 2001
    New Albany, MS
    Ahh, thanks for the explanation.

    So probably not going to do much for your basic mic into pa guy....
     
  15. A simplified version comes standard on SWR and Eden heads. They call it an enhancer. I have an Eden WT400, and have owned SWR in the past, but I never used that feature. Just dont like it. It basically boosts the lows a little, and certain of the high frequencies, and removes some of the mid frequencies. I personally feel that if you have to eq an amp, then you're using the wrong amp. I run my Eden dead flat for bass guitar, and use a GK MB150E112 with Bag End 112 ext cab for DB, and this is run dead flat too. For rockabilly or country gigs I'll use the bigger Eden rig for DB, and once again, dead flat! The enhancer is basically a very sophisticated eq, but IMO it belongs in the studio, not on stage. BTW, I once tried out a BBE exciter (same thing as the Aphex) and did not really like it any more than the SWR/Eden enhancer.
     
  16. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I have a WT300 with enhancer and also always run it flat, as well!

    But Aphex are legendary in the studio world and I wondered what the difference was between the "acoustic" box - which is being advertised by a DB player - and normal enhancement?
     
  17. mje

    mje

    Aug 1, 2002
    Southeast Michigan
    I recall looking at the original Aphex patent back in the 70s, and what it did was very simple: It generated second order harmonic distortion by clipping the signal, ran the result through a high-pass filter and mixed this back into the main signal. The effect was to gove some peceived "air" to recordings lacking a lot of real high end. It works well enough if you don't overuse it but it's rather fatiguing to listen to over time. You can hear the effect on Ricki Lee Jones' first album, particularly on "Chuck E's in Love", just before the vocals enter.

    (I think the later version adds some subharmonics derived by low-pass filtering the signal, clipping it and running that into a divider, but I'm not sure.)
     
  18. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Yes - but that doesn't answer my question of what is different in the 'acoustic' version?