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Anyone ever opened up a Trace Elliot GP7 bass combo?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Smashingdugongs, May 14, 2018.


  1. Smashingdugongs

    Smashingdugongs

    May 1, 2018
    I recently bought a Trace Elliot GP7 SM 200 watt bass combo on gumtree, it sounds fantastic and I'll be gigging with it in a few days. I was wondering if anyone knew about the insides of one of these amps, as I'm planning to fix some casters to the bottom as it's quite difficult to move about without two people. If I start drilling holes in the bottom of the amp, am I likely to damage some electronics, or the cones or something? Or is this not a recommended method of making the amp more mobile?
     

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  2. Make a dolly with large (4"/100mm+ diameter) solid rubber tyred casters. You won't damage the combo drilling holes into it and the larger wheel diameter with some shock protection will make it easier to move over roughish ground (car parks for example). Small diameter hard plastic casters are only any good on smooth surfaces. As the pcb will have relatively heavy components soldered to it you want to avoid shock and vibration as these can fracture and break the solder joints. Trace Elliot gear has always been made well and rugged but a 50 yard drag over a rough surface could do harm.
     
  3. Where are you based? I was checking out B&Q (UK) and you can pick up some decent looking tradesman dolleys for about what it’ll cost you for the casters.

    They can take heavy enough loads for when you add a 15 or another 2x10 :bassist:
     
  4. klejst

    klejst

    Oct 5, 2010
    Nebraska
    Awesome pick up there, that older TE stuff is amazing! I owned one of the 4x10 and 2x10 combo variety (my 2x10's speakers where kind of vertically aligned instead of horizontally), but never opened them.
     
  5. chadds

    chadds

    Mar 18, 2000
    Get a piece of marine plywood. Paint it black. Bolt your casters to it. Staple a welcome mat cut to fit to top. Voila! The welcome mat will cause it to adhere to bottom of cab when you climb curbs. You now have a dolly to use for other gear. There is no danger of cab damage if a caster gets caught while rolling over terrain. Your cab is pristine with no holes in it. You can leave it on dolly or not depending on the sound desired.
     
  6. I built a couple of dollies for moving my gear. Bought some big casters from a surplus store very cheaply. A suitably sized piece of 3/4” ply and some left over carpet finished the job. :)
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2018

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