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Anyone know what "lebile" means?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by Jay, Dec 29, 2001.


  1. Jay

    Jay

    Oct 19, 2000
    Bidwell, OH
    In an etude I'm playing on tuba, there's either a passage or a portion of a measure marked "lebile." I can't tell which it is due to the fact that it's marked at the end of the last measure in a line. No clue what it means or to what exact portion of the music it pertains. If anyone happens to have the book of Rubank Selected Studies for Baritone on them, it is C Major. Somebody help me! :eek: :D

    Thanks y'all.
     
  2. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    I believe it's french for "the sh*t".
     
  3. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    If I didn't have a sense of humor, I would say that was funny. :p :D

    I still haven't found the word anywhere yet, Jay.

    To people: lebile or labile? We didn't know.
     
  4. Jay

    Jay

    Oct 19, 2000
    Bidwell, OH
    :rolleyes:

    Anyone else? :D
     
  5. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    Might the word be truncated?
     
  6. I can't find anything on it. Searches turn up a usage in Italian that is similiar to the French labile , roughly translated to unstable. A google search for lebile got a fair amount of Italian pages as well as the pdf for the music you are talking about (see url below). I tried lebile and music, no luck. Google suggested labile and that turned up some music references that implied unstable or changing. Somehow I doubt this what this notation means.

    At any rate, here's the music if anyone wants to see it in context. 61 k file size, seems to download smoother with a right click rather than open in a browser window.
    http://www.atssb.org/execsec/TUBA.A1.pdf
     
  7. Jay

    Jay

    Oct 19, 2000
    Bidwell, OH
    Nope.

    That's the whole word, no indication of an abbreviation whatsoever. This is killin' me guys, someone must know!

    BTW, thanks Joe for the link. If no one knows what it means, maybe y'all can give me some idea of what to do special there. It's racking my brain big time.

    Thanks.
     
  8. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    Also, it ain't Italian, Latin, French, German or English.
     
  9. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    There's an English word, labile, that's close to the French word, Joe. Before Jay posted the thread, we were talking about it, and I asked my brother, a guitar player, about it. He said that labile is a term used in chemistry, roughly meaning that something is subject to change or is going through change (this is my paraphrase of him). He said that applied to music it would be like the antithesis of smooth, so maybe a passage played sharply or tongued.That was just his guess, though.
     
  10. Jay

    Jay

    Oct 19, 2000
    Bidwell, OH
    Well y'all, I had a lesson today with Larry Campbell, the director of bands at Blinn College in Brenham, TX (where they make Blue Bell Icecream :D). He's a great teacher and a "hoss of a tuba player" as my director calls him. Anyway, I asked him, and he informed me that it was simply another way of saying legato. :eek: So easy yet it was so hard to figure out....

    Thanks y'all.
     
  11. Thanks for clearing that up. It fits since the next time the phrase appeared in the music it was with staccato dots.
     
  12. Fred123

    Fred123

    Nov 6, 2007
    I found this in my music and and could not figure out lebile either. But the word was actually flebile. The f used was bold print and I thought it was a forte but looking closer every f used in the musical notation looked like a forte but wasn't.

    flebile - plaintive, mournful, doeful, sad.

    I am not a string bass player but a brass bass player. I found this in Selected Studies for Baritone by H Voxman. C Major etude by Gatti.

    Hope this helps others!
     
  13. rfclef

    rfclef

    Jan 19, 2007
    Woodburn, Oregon
    Back when I taught down in TX, took my Jazz band to the Blinn jazz festival...
     
  14. atssbexecsec

    atssbexecsec

    Oct 20, 2011
    There was a scanning error when the original Baritone BC part was scanned to transcribe (with publisher permission) to Finale for use with the tuba auditions. the scripted F in "flebile" looked to the scan as if it were the sign for FORTE, so it came out in the Finale scan as "F" then "lebile" - which was just this day caught and reported (after 20 years of using these etudes!). The link now reflects "flebile" which means legato, smooth, etc.

    Thanks for all your input!

    Kenneth L. Griffin
    ATSSB Executive Secretary
    atssb@att.net