Anyone on TB own a Torzal?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by ErikP.Bass, Dec 26, 2009.

  1. ErikP.Bass

    ErikP.Bass Supporting Member

    Nov 23, 2004
    I know these have been discussed here and Ed Friedland did a great review of them, but I am wondering if anyone here on TB owns a Torzal Twist bass. Please post if you own one or have played one.

    Looks like Jerome is changing up the website a bit. Some really cool build pictures up there.
     
  2. ErikP.Bass

    ErikP.Bass Supporting Member

    Nov 23, 2004
  3. DerHoggz

    DerHoggz I like cats :| Inactive

    Feb 13, 2009
    Western Pennsylvania
    They're mighty expensive AFAIK.
     
  4. ErikP.Bass

    ErikP.Bass Supporting Member

    Nov 23, 2004
    Anyone own one? They are similar in price point to some other custom builders suprisingly.
     
  5. koobie

    koobie Supporting Member

    Jul 11, 2007
    Portland OR
    Those look really cool, would love to try one some day. Unique is an overused term, but the twisted neck Torzal bass qualifies.
     
  6. Ive always wanted one since Ed first posted the video review of it. I doubt Ill ever buy it dueto the probability that Ill be unable to try it out before I purchase.
     
  7. Jjango

    Jjango

    Nov 16, 2007
    Los Angeles, CA
    I don't think anyone on TB owns one. I've never seen a thread where someone claims ownership, but of course, I could have missed it.
     
  8. MichaelScott

    MichaelScott

    Jul 27, 2004
    Moorpark CA
    They look really cool but I can't stomach the price. Maybe he'll sell the design to a larger company and they can mass produce them at an affordable price.
     
  9. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    I don't really understand what everybody is talking about. $3300 for an instrument with luthier this complex, difficult and time consuming is nothing. There are very, very few small builders and custom instrument makers that aren't in this price range.

    For that matter, almost all (from Sadowsky/Zon/Modulus/etc) start in this range and go 2-3x higher (Fodera, F Bass, etc etc etc).

    By comparison, given the work involved, their prices are absolutely cheap.
     
  10. +1

    There is nothing out of line with that price for a handcrafted bass, not to mention a design with a lot of new technology/design aspects. Great looking stuff!
     
  11. Darkstrike

    Darkstrike Return Of The King!

    Sep 14, 2007
    There was a TBer who built one himself, that was pretty sweet.
     
  12. Buchada Azeda

    Buchada Azeda

    Mar 25, 2009
    Brazil
    I believe the guy who played with the Gipsy Kings, Xavier Padilla or something like that, is a TBer. He owns one.
     
  13. MichaelScott

    MichaelScott

    Jul 27, 2004
    Moorpark CA
    Price is a pretty subjective thing so it is hard to make arguments about it. You may justify it as being a 'deal' because it seems like a complicated build process but I can argue that it is a weird body design that people don't want to fork over more then 3 bills for. They would rather buy that Sadowsky/Zon/Modulus/etc that is been tested in the community.

    It seems no one on this forum has one, which could be an indicator of too high price. Also, you don't have one even though you seem to think it is a great deal. If it was $800-$1,200 dollars (which is the price of a new mass market bass) would you buy it? I'd be willing to and I think a bunch of people on the forums would.
     
  14. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    Price isn't subjective. Value is, though, and I think that's more what you are intending.

    Yes, I think it's a great deal because the amount of work involved in making that neck/body is substantially more than what is involved in making a Sadowsky (which has a similar base price point). Actually, hugely more. But saying that the body/neck is weird and thus shouldn't command $3000 is a meaningless argument. It is priced based on a reasonable cost of labor. Put it at $800-1200 and the luthier will make zero money. This isn't a CNC-made Fender...it takes real time to produce given the very complicated arrangement. Whether or not you like the "weird" body, they charge $3000 because they need more than $1200 to earn a living.

    I'm sure a lot of people would buy it at $800-1200, but the reality it is NOT a mass market instrument. It sounds nice to price it there so you can buy it, but that doesn't mean that that pricing makes any sense whatsoever. It is a niche instrument, so it caters to a niche audience that probably needs the relief that it provides, and $3,000 is not bad at all by comparison.

    The fact that nobody here owns one (that has posted anyway) is not by any means directly correlated to the price being too high. As I said, niche instrument, niche audience, few customers. Besides, how many people that come around here own a normal instrument by this company? It's small and gets relatively little business compared to the other mentioned I'm sure, so it's less likely someone will see one.

    The fact that I don't own one doesn't have any bearing on whether or not I can think it's a good deal. I think Toyota Corollas are a great deal. I don't own one, and probably won't ever. Does that mean I can't think it's a good deal?

    It would be great if everything cost within the range that made us happy.
     
  15. Chansey

    Chansey

    Nov 25, 2007
    The concept looks really interesting but I guess there are fears when the price of testing out an unknown feature is over $3000 dollars. You can draw a parallel with a lot of apprehension demonstrated towards fanned fret instruments...which I suppose is where the Dingwall Combustion comes from. Furthermore, the neck twist to me at least...inspires more visual uncertainty than the fanned frets. Sure, I have a measure of faith in the builder and the website FAQ, but I am sure most will question points like neck stability and difficulty in setting up/maintenance.

    IMO though, given the extensive work involved in the design, it wouldn't be as simple to implement in a more mid price model or an import line. While the price of admission will be more attractive, the uncertainty of the neck design coupled with innate market bias against overseas production will probably limit its appeal. I bet the effort and quality control that goes into constructing such a unique design will also be hard to replicate in a mass production instrument. Just my 2 cents of course...
     
  16. Darkstrike

    Darkstrike Return Of The King!

    Sep 14, 2007
    I wish NYC Sadowskys cost 800 bucks, I'd buy one if they cost 800 bucks....... :rolleyes:
     
  17. ErikP.Bass

    ErikP.Bass Supporting Member

    Nov 23, 2004
    I think the price is quite fair. If I could sell off some of my gear I think I might order one. I wonder if he'd consider doing just a neck. I know you would lose some of the overall twist but it may work. Though it would probably still be a good amount of cash but more people might consider it.

    I really dig the idea, been fascinated by it for a while.
     
  18. mrtn400

    mrtn400

    Dec 6, 2008
    Carmichael, CA
    I'm pretty sure that in order for it to work, you'd need to have the bridge and pickups raised and angled too.
     
  19. Darkstrike

    Darkstrike Return Of The King!

    Sep 14, 2007
    The bridge is twisted to an angle in the opposite direction, as are the pickups, in balance to the strings angle at their positions.


    This is but *one* reason these have boutique prices, there is some serious tech going on.
     
  20. mrtn400

    mrtn400

    Dec 6, 2008
    Carmichael, CA
    Apparently he will make a twisted neck for a regular bass, since he made one for a guitar. [Link]

    I'm not sure how much cheaper it'd be compared to a full bass.