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Anyone tried mounting a reverb tank under a pedalboard?

Discussion in 'Effects [BG]' started by Eric!, Apr 11, 2010.


  1. Eric!

    Eric! Commercial User

    Jan 22, 2009
    America's High-Five
    Mojo Hand FX
    Personally, I think it'd be badass, albeit also a pain in the ass, but I'm just curious if anyone's ever tried it?

    Got the idea when I saw some old passive rackmount units available, and though "Dang, I could just hook one of these up to an x-blender, stick it under the board, and rock!"
     
  2. Thats what this has been designed for.
     
  3. Eric!

    Eric! Commercial User

    Jan 22, 2009
    America's High-Five
    Mojo Hand FX
    Whoa!
     
  4. tony_clifton

    tony_clifton

    Nov 14, 2009
    I don't know about that boutique product, but DIY would probably pick up too many stage vibrations and ruin your sound.
     
  5. RyreInc

    RyreInc

    May 11, 2006
    Kalamazoo, MI
    This inspired me to rip out my reverb tank from a broken guitar amp. The spring unit is isolated from the housing by additional springs--this should take care of stage vibration issues. I found a website that give some circuits and other useful info: http://sound.westhost.com/project34.htm

    I might have to try this!
     
  6. M0ses

    M0ses

    Sep 11, 2009
    Los Angeles
    What....is a reverb tank?
     
  7. Webtroll

    Webtroll Rolling for initiative

    Apr 23, 2006
    Austin, TX
    I thought the reverb tank had to be in the amp so the springs would vibrate naturally with the audio, if in the pedalboard wouldn't it just pickup vibrations when you stomp on pedals?
     
  8. Eric!

    Eric! Commercial User

    Jan 22, 2009
    America's High-Five
    Mojo Hand FX
    Well like, the rackmount units I saw had XLR in/out. Pretty sure that it's shielded from outside interference and applies the verb to the passing-through signal only.

    Then again, I only came across this last night
     
  9. Taylor Livingston

    Taylor Livingston Supporting Member Commercial User

    Dec 25, 2002
    Oregon, US
    Owner, Iron Ether Electronics
    No, your sound is amplified and run into the springs via transducers that turn your electrical signal into vibration, then turn the vibration coming out of the spring back into an electrical signal. The only reason they're usually in amps rather than pedalboards is that the spring needs to be big to sound decent, and amps have lots of space available.

    Passive spring verbs are no good for bass. You have to put a line level (louder than your bass) signal into them, then you get a mic level signal out (quieter than your bass). These are meant to be used in a studio where effects sends are already line level and you can plug the output into a mic preamp to makeup for the lost volume. Spring reverbs meant for instruments have the pre-spring amplification and post-spring recovery gain already built in, and you absolutely need this.
     
  10. Eric!

    Eric! Commercial User

    Jan 22, 2009
    America's High-Five
    Mojo Hand FX
    So basically, too much hassle. Got it ;)
     
  11. Taylor Livingston

    Taylor Livingston Supporting Member Commercial User

    Dec 25, 2002
    Oregon, US
    Owner, Iron Ether Electronics
    Well, I would just go for one of the many integrated units that are designed to work for guitar and bass.
     
  12. I've got an old "Vibra-Sonic" unit from a 1958 Pontiac that was installed by me in 1961 for a friend.

    I have it running behind a Radio Shack power supply (1-Amp/13VDC) and it works fine for guitar and bass. It has RCAs on both ends and just jacks into the loop on my Crate GFX1200H. I love it and it's pretty nice to have real electro-mechanical reverb and not something that's plotted on an algorithm inside a chip.

    It has warmth and tone and unbelievable sustain.
     

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