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Anyone use a STEWART PA100B amp?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by deepestend, Mar 16, 2004.


  1. deepestend

    deepestend Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 21, 2003
    Brooklyn via Austin and NOLA
    Guitar/Bass Builder and Social Media at Sadowsky
    I just bought one of these to use at home for a monitor system... but at 5.5 pounds and 200watts bridgeable at 4ohms, it looks like a good amp to take with me to gigs where I need an amp but not a cab.

    I can't find any reviews from people who have used it for this... anyone tried it?
     
  2. I don't really understand your question about using it when you need an amp, but not a cab. I've been in situations where I could tote just a preamp/DI. You'll need some kind of preamp with Stewart no matter what you use it for.

    I use one as my home practice amp (Fishman EQ/Stewart 100b/Acme 2X10). I also carry it as a backup to my 11 year old SWR 220. It sounds fine (clear and flat) and has no problem pushing the Acme (notoriously power hungry) to jazz combo levels.
     
  3. deepestend

    deepestend Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 21, 2003
    Brooklyn via Austin and NOLA
    Guitar/Bass Builder and Social Media at Sadowsky
    Well, here's a little bit more to clarify:

    I'd definitely be using a Sansamp DI as a pre. I also have a presonus blue tube that I use in my studio that could also work as a pre.

    Right now, I have a Hartke 3500 head in my studio that I play through (with a 1x15). I like it, but I don't use the eq or compression at all-- I don't like the EQ and my ebs pedal compressor works a lot better for me. So, I was thinking of selling the Hartke 3500 and getting a power amp instead.

    At the same time, I needed an amp for my studio monitors and got a good deal on the stewart amp. And it got me to thinking, why not just use the stewart to play with my band and then get another cheap amp for my home monitors (you can get a stewart 100watt for $109 on ebay right now).

    So, I guess my question is just how well the stewart works when you're playing with other people. Enough power? Obviously, I'm gonna try it out myself when I get it next week, but just thought I'd ask. I play with a drummer and a guitarist on a marshall stack at reasonable levels.
     
  4. It's all subjective. What's a reasonable level?

    You'll just have to try it. I suspect with an efficient cab it should do the job (I've used my old 220 with a 4X10 to do lots of small to medium club gigs with a roadhouse band playing a mixture of blues, classic rock, etc). Ultimately, I think it's a bit under powered to be a versatile gigging amp.
     
  5. deepestend

    deepestend Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 21, 2003
    Brooklyn via Austin and NOLA
    Guitar/Bass Builder and Social Media at Sadowsky
    Joe, If you're still around, I have one more question for you... I've just been using the stewart as a monitor amp and now I'm moving to a new apartment where I'll want to use it as a practice amp. I went to Sam Ash to ask them if they had a pre-made cord to use and they had no idea what I need. What do you do to connect the amp to the speaker? Did you have to make your own cord?
     
  6. Lowtonejoe

    Lowtonejoe Supporting Member

    Jul 3, 2004
    Richland, WA
    If I may butt in...Why don't you just hook it up the same way you did your monitors?

    Terminal strip to speaker.

    :)

    Joe.
     
  7. deepestend

    deepestend Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 21, 2003
    Brooklyn via Austin and NOLA
    Guitar/Bass Builder and Social Media at Sadowsky
    Well, the amp doesn't really have regular connectors. It has the kind like on old TV antennae's where you just have a screw and you wrap the wire around the screw. That works fine for speaker cable, but I'm just not sure how to get from a wire to a quarter inch or speakon connector... maybe it's as easy as getting some parts from radio shack-- I'd just like to know if a cable already exists.
     
  8. Lowtonejoe

    Lowtonejoe Supporting Member

    Jul 3, 2004
    Richland, WA
    Ah.

    Yes, it is as easy as going to radio shack and buying some wire and a connector.

    OR

    Cut one end off of an existing speaker cable.

    If you are bridging mono into a single 8 ohm cab you don't have to worry about polarity but you should hook up the positive terminal to the wire going to the tip of the connector just out of principle.

    :)

    Or are you using speakons?

    Joe.
     
  9. As Joe pointed out it's relatively simple to make your own speaker cables and most stuff you need is at the Shack. For short runs and low power situations like this I recommend 14 gauge wire. It's a lot easier to work with than the 12 gauge stuff you can get from Radio Shack or Home Depot. If you need a 1/4" or speakon you will have to do some soldering. No soldering skills? No problem.

    Simply get a short 1/4" (or speakon) to 1/4" speaker cable. Unscrew the barrel of the connector and note which wire goes to the tip. Then clip the 1/4" plug off, strip back the insulation a bit, twist the strands of the wire to keep them in place, then form them into a hook shape (If you are detaching fairly often, you probably want to invest in some crimp on spade tongue connectors).
    [​IMG]
    Now, remember which wire went to the tip? That one goes on the left or number one post. Slip these hooks around the screw posts and tighten down. Voila! This is even easier if one end of the cable is a banana. With those, you can usually just unscrew the crimp screws and slip the wires out.

    Another option is to simply have a cable made for you. Most pro audio shops will do this or you can order from Pro Cables and Sound. Just contact them and let them know you want spade connectors on one end.

    One final option to consider, particularly if you move the amp often. I had a male dual banana to 1/4" female adapter laying around. Most big musician's stores carry these (or you can order from sameday music or music 123, etc).
    [​IMG]
    I unscrewed the banana plug and attached the cable to the screw posts. I found the amp easier to tote around with the short adapter cable than with a longer speaker cable.
     
  10. deepestend

    deepestend Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 21, 2003
    Brooklyn via Austin and NOLA
    Guitar/Bass Builder and Social Media at Sadowsky
    Thanks to both Joes... sounds like a relatively simple procedure to put one together. I will visit the shack this afternoon and collect the equipment I'll need. Thanks again, you've both saved me a lot of time and trial and error.
     
  11. Lowtonejoe

    Lowtonejoe Supporting Member

    Jul 3, 2004
    Richland, WA
    WoW!

    Good idea!

    :)

    Joe.
     
  12. Lowtonejoe

    Lowtonejoe Supporting Member

    Jul 3, 2004
    Richland, WA
    Hey, no prob.

    I really, really like Joe's idea of using a short banana-female 1/4 adapter and taking the banana plug off.

    Very convenient and not very expensive.

    But then if you got the female adapter at radio shack you could make your own anyways.

    Whatever.

    You get the idea.

    Good luck man!

    :)

    Joe.
     
  13. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    One thing to keep in mind, if you use this sort of adapter on an amp that is in bridged mono, is that both conductors of the speaker line are live. Therefore, the barrel of the 1/4" jack also is live, and you must be careful that it does not short out against the rack, the amp chassis, other equipment, etc.
     
  14. Good catch Bob. I haven't had any trouble with mine (I don't rack it, just tote it in a soft briefcase type bag). I'll be wrapping that plug (and the male plugs of the speaker cable) in electricians tape ASAP. Better safe than sorry. Since most electronics are smoke and mirrors to me, I try not to let the smoke out. ;)
     
  15. Lowtonejoe

    Lowtonejoe Supporting Member

    Jul 3, 2004
    Richland, WA
    OUCH!

    Good point.

    On those jacks does the case have to be connected to the negative? It seems to me that I have seen them with a plastic sleeve that goes over the tangs to stop them from contacting the inside of the barrel.

    Joe.
     
  16. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    Commonly, it is, but it doesn't necessarily have to be.

    In non-bridged operation, the negative side of most amp outputs is at chassis ground, so that type of adapter usually won't cause a problem--only in bridged.

    A few years ago I had a lengthy tech support correspondence via e-mail with a guy who had this problem where the PLX amps in his PA rig would clip on channel 2, so he switched them to stereo, and the clipping went away.

    It took a number of back-and-forths to discover that he had some banana-to-1/4" adapters like the one pictured in this thread, and he had strapped the barrels of the 1/4" jacks to the rear rack rails to serve as a strain relief, but that also shorted that side of each speaker cable to ground.
     
  17. Bob, it seems that maybe an adapter with a speakon connector would be a better way to go (less chance of shorts). I'm not really familiar with speakons, and when I looked up the Neutrik connectors, I couldn't find male or female, just cable or panel mount. Are they all one type?