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Are pickguards this expensive???

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Rano Bass, Mar 24, 2009.


  1. savit260

    savit260

    Mar 6, 2006
    Boston
    Keep in mind, that white guards were priimarily used on Custom Colors back then. Stnadard finish would have had a tortoise guard.... soooo Custom Color Early Transitional Jazz ??

    Even in this very down market, you're looking at $6000+ actual selling price on the very low end.

    I'd say that's a pretty conservative number. Possible up to $10,000 to the right person on the right day depending on condition , case , covers , etc.
     
  2. It seriously is not the same concept. You can't compare a cariatide that was hand sculpted thousands of years ago with a piece of plastic that was mass produced MAYBE 44 years ago. Really, the one involves master skills and art, and is TRULY unique, and the other involves a factory worker, a machine, and CAN be duplicated (without no one understanding it, unless radiometric dating is used...:rollno:).
     
  3. Mr. Ray

    Mr. Ray

    Feb 20, 2009
    Canada
    I sincerely still ask the question...how do you know it is authentic? Certain parts have numbers etc. just because somebody says the pickguard is from a certain year doesn't mean it is. Most collectibles can be verified i.e baseball cards, coins..but pickguards? I really would like to know??:meh:
     
  4. savit260

    savit260

    Mar 6, 2006
    Boston
    There are people who do know, and I doubt anyone would fork over that kind of money without knowing for sure.

    I can tell you in a blink of an eye the difference between an original tortoise p/g from that era (because I own one) and the repro stuff. Different material. I'm sure others (jazz bass experts) can tell the difference on that one as well.

    I'm sure the people at Gruhn's could authenticate it.
     
  5. Enough to justify the $700 pickguard.
     
  6. At least you're not afraid to admit it :cool:
     
  7. Mr. Ray

    Mr. Ray

    Feb 20, 2009
    Canada
    They can pinpoint the date to a certain year? They may be able to give an era like ceramic or glass collectibles...but I doubt they could say what year it was actually manufactured. Who's to say it's not old stock plastic that has been cut to shape and reliced? :meh:
     
  8. savit260

    savit260

    Mar 6, 2006
    Boston

    While you may not notice that it's there, a potential buyer a few years down the road will certainly notice if it's NOT there. ;) or if there's a $12 ebay guard there in it's place.

    ... and that's precisely why someone will cough big bucks for one.
     
  9. Jimmy Bones

    Jimmy Bones

    Feb 24, 2009
    Baxley, GA
    Well, so yea, it's possible the guy could get gypped on a really well done aging of a repro guard.

    But the point behind it is, the guy (presumably) wants his gear to be completely authentic to the period. Any collector who really has a goal in mind will do what it takes to meet his goals, be it through trickery, high expenditure, smooth talking, whatever.

    I *personally* would not buy a pick guard for more than the local Hot Licks sells them for. Truth be told, I wouldn't care that much about it because I'm not all sappy for fenders. Buuuuut... I'd lie, cheat, and steal to get one of the early Grateful Dead Alembics...
     
  10. savit260

    savit260

    Mar 6, 2006
    Boston
    The era is 65 to 68. There may be/probalby is documentation of the bass it came off of, and there ARE people who are experts in this field. Someone who's going to spend that kind of money will most likely take the time to make sure it's the real deal.

    What's so hard to understand about this?

    How do you know that the seller doesn't have pix and documentation of the bass the parts came off of?

    This really isn't that complicated.


    If I parted out my Precision, it would't be too hard to document all the parts. Do you really think the seller or the buyer hasn't taken any of this into consideration?
     
  11. And any person who really has a goal of making easy money (and has some intelligence) can make profit out of these really determined to have everything original collectors (who will do whatever it takes to achieve this, meaning that they will shell out much money for this) by selling them easily reproduced "vintage" parts like pickguards, bridges, control plates, tuning machines, etc...
    This is trickery, but...
     
  12. Vynns

    Vynns Guest

    May 5, 2008
    You earn that in a week? Are you very lucky or am I abhorrently underpayed?
     
  13. savit260

    savit260

    Mar 6, 2006
    Boston
    ...again.. there are experts who can tell the difference between a fake and the real thing.

    I'm sure there are scammers out there, but I highly doubt they'd be able to blow anything past experts like Gruhn guitars, Mandolin Bros. or other recognized experts.

    ...and yet again, I'm sure the buyer covered his bases. If they didn't then shame on them.
     
  14. Jimmy Bones

    Jimmy Bones

    Feb 24, 2009
    Baxley, GA
    Ahem. ^
     
  15. I admit that I am not an expert on this subject, but I REALLY believe that a 3 ply piece of plastic can be successfully replicated by some "expert" scammer. I mean, many works of art were replicated, and they were nearly impossible to identify as fakes.
    Am I really (almost) THE ONLY one here that believes that a plastic can be be made to look exactly like one other? (with the help of heat, UV radiation, scratching, etc)
     
  16. I am sorry, I didn't mean to sound like I disagree with you.
    I agree with what you said, and I just used some of the words of your post to express myself.
     
  17. OK so the asking price on the pickguard was $725.

    Which is about 12% of $6000 and 7.25% of $10,000

    Is a pickguard worth roughly 1/10th the price of an entire MIA Fender Jazz bass? A new MIA Jazz bass costs about $1500. Would you pay $150 for a standard and correct pickguard for one?

    It looks like the $725 pickguard didn't sell, so there's an answer.
     
  18. savit260

    savit260

    Mar 6, 2006
    Boston

    I can tell you with 100% certainty, on my own Precision, the tortoise material the pickguard is made out of is very different than what they use today. There would be no chance of fooling me with a repro tortoise guard. I had a guard made for another one of my basses out of stuff that is as as close as possible to the original material, and guess what... they don't look the same, and I could easily tell the difference.
    Just using my own gear as an example.

    Now, that said, there's a more than fair chance that the plastic used on those old guards is different than what is used today. An EXPERT would proably be able to tell the difference fairly quickly.

    Same would go for tuners. The repro tuners aren't exactly the same, and those familiar with "the real deal" can spot the difference in an instant.
     
  19. savit260

    savit260

    Mar 6, 2006
    Boston

    Ask yourself this... Can you go to any local music shop, guitar center or ebay webstore and get a genuine Fender stock replacement pickguard for a 2009 Jazz bass? The answer is yes. Yes you can. Very easy to come by.



    Now, ask yourself this... Can you go to any loca music shop, Guitar Center, or ebay webstore, and get a genuine Fender stock replacement pickguard that is from the correct era for a Transitional Fender Jazz? The answer is no. No you can't. Not particularly easy to come by.

    ...and that's why it's so expensive.

    Find me another one at any price for sale.
     
  20. Mr. Ray

    Mr. Ray

    Feb 20, 2009
    Canada
    How do you know the era is 65 to 68 ? I've probably owned more vintage early Fenders than most players and parts can get mixed around. (And yes my 61 P bass did have a tortoise guard). I know lots of buyers/collectors that have more money than brains. It's not difficult to understand...but you haven't answered the question how can you verify it's authentic. Your expert opinion and $5.00 can buy me a coffee at Starbucks.:)
     

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