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Are there inexpensive 10-strings, doubled that is?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Tsal, Mar 23, 2003.


  1. Tsal

    Tsal

    Jan 28, 2000
    Finland, EU
    Ever since I heard JPJ's solo material in Zooma, I've been drooling for a bass with doubled strings. Of course it'll require some guitar amp to go with distortion etc but would fit very well in three-piece bands, what I seem to have in my hands now.

    So, are there any relatively inexpensive doubled-fives around, say somewhere around 500-600 bucks? I could get me an 8-string Dean Rhapsody or something but I'm more a 5-string player than 4..
     
  2. Taylor Livingston

    Taylor Livingston Supporting Member Commercial User

    Dec 25, 2002
    Louisiana, US
    Owner, Iron Ether Electronics
    Obviously, this is a bit late, but better late than never, right?

    I've found absolutely no mass-produced 10-strings. JPJ's 10- and 12- (and everything else but his Fender) were made by Manson Guitars. Barry Sparks (Yngwie Malmsteen) made his by buying a pre-fab 6-string neck from Carvin, and making the rest on his own. These are the only guys I'm aware of with doubled fivers. I'm having one made right now.

    You don't need a separate amp; I assume you read about JPJ's and that's where you got the idea. It's not necessary, if you have a bass distortion you like. His 10- and 12-string basses have the neck pickup run clean into a bass amp and the bridge through effects and into a guitar amp. If want his sound, maybe you could go that way (if you get a custom) but it's only necessary if you use effects that don't have an effected/clean mix circuit (and even if that's the case, they can usually be modded for about $10-$30, much cheaper than another amp). It's fine for him, but it really is unnecessary and unrealistic for what you want to pay (I'm poor too, probably moreso than you, so I feel your pain :bawl: :D ).

    Hope I helped some. Good luck!
     
  3. how can you run through a guitar amp without damaging it? i thought it was a bad thing to run bass through a guitar amp, and i don't see any way of separating the signal from the bass strings and the guitar strings........
     
  4. Taylor Livingston

    Taylor Livingston Supporting Member Commercial User

    Dec 25, 2002
    Louisiana, US
    Owner, Iron Ether Electronics
    I don't think it's a big deal to run a bass through a guitar amp. My friend who was a guitar player never wanted me to play my bass through his amp. He said it would melt the circuit board or something. I don't think this is true, at least not for a decent, relatively powerful amp - maybe for a little combo. You wouldn't get a great sound out of a guitar amp, though. Maybe it would be a bad idea to play a low B (my stereo speakers sure don't like that), but I think it's okay.

    As for separating the bass and octave strings, it is possible with piezos (you would need a separate saddle for each string, which is often not the case with doubled-string bridges). Micheal Manring's site says he's going to get this setup in his 10-string (I can't believe I forgot him! He's the only other one I know of with a double-five), with separate outputs for each of the 10 strings.
     
  5. NioeZero

    NioeZero

    Sep 2, 2001
    Running your bass through a guitar amp isn't going to damage anything. Running it through a guitar CABINET, on the other hand, might blow some speakers. If you ran your bridge PUP through a guitar amp into a bass cab, you'd have no problems.
     
  6. Tsal

    Tsal

    Jan 28, 2000
    Finland, EU
    The idea would be to use EQ pedal or similar (in this case the EQ section of BDDI) to cut the lows from the signal.

    Guitar amps are designed to handle mids and highs, but lows probably break the speakers on higher volumes.
     
  7. om u can do two things, buy a new five string that has a big headstock,buy a new nut bridge and tunners and make it ur self, or buy a neck from warmoth.
     
  8. when i said buy a neck from warmoth i ment to say then put the neck on a 5 string bass and get a new bridge. and tuners
     
  9. well, when i said 'amp' i was thinking of the speaker getting damaged. i've only used combos, so i think of it all as one piece........

    and am i wrong in thinking there are differences between instrument speakers and stereo equipment speakers? i remember hearing somewhere that you can ruin stereo speakers playing a bass through them too....but if you can play recordings of bass, why not a bass directly?
     
  10. Taylor Livingston

    Taylor Livingston Supporting Member Commercial User

    Dec 25, 2002
    Louisiana, US
    Owner, Iron Ether Electronics
    A sub can handle very low bass. If you have smaller speakers that aren't meant to handle low frequencies, they can distort when they receive sound they can't handle. Distortion (in this situation) is bad for speakers. Don't take that to mean that reproducing distorted guitar will damage your speakers; it's the speakers themselves distorting that is bad.

    The reproducing bass on recordings as opposed to you playing bass is complicated, and can involve countless variables, and I'm not knowledgable enough to go too into it. It involves the stuff like compression and what frequencies are picked up by can microphones and so forth. Someone with more knowledge there might be able to help.

    I've played my bass through my component stereo amp (all my components were given to me by my neighbors, so I'm not too worried about them should something go wrong) and speakers. It works ok, but won't reproduce anything lower than a low E (but I don't have a sub). If you drive the amp or speakers too much, you'll mess things up. It's probably a good idea to not try.
     
  11. Fluke

    Fluke

    Jul 20, 2002
    Yaknow i wonder why there aren't more 12-strings, double 6 strings that is. It would really be a great sound for chording on the highest strings, plus you could have synth-like bottom with the low B.