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Are there more than three clefs?

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by SuperDuck, Nov 29, 2001.


  1. SuperDuck

    SuperDuck

    Sep 26, 2000
    Wisconsin
    Aside from the obvious bass and treble, and the often unused tenor clef, are there any others? I was thinking there might be one below bass, since the concert piano goes down pretty low... but then again, isn't there a mark that denotes an octave lower, negating the need for a lower clef?
     
  2. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    Soprano, Treble, Tenor, Bass, and Contra Bass are all clefs. There are only 3 clef signs though. Soprano and Treble use the same sign, as do Bass and Contra Bass.
     
  3. lo-end

    lo-end

    Jun 15, 2001
    PA
    no baritone clef? what about alto clef?
     
  4. Christopher

    Christopher

    Apr 28, 2000
    New York, NY
    The ones I'm most familiar with are treble, bass, tenor and alto. You see tenor frequently with double bass music, and even more often with cello music, and alto fairly often with viola music.

    I imagine there are others, but to what use those are put (and who would bother to learn them) I can't imagine.
     
  5. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    Pacman is partially correct. Actually, there are...

    Three Tenors
    [​IMG]
     
  6. JimK

    JimK

    Dec 12, 1999
    ...and the Clefs can be moved anywhere on the staff.
    Look at our Bass Clef: its two(2)dots are embracing the "F" LINE on the staff.

    There's part of the Treble Clef symbol that intersects the "G" LINE on that staff.


    And the Tenor Clef, too embraces a certain line.

    Super D-
    Correct, there are 'symbols' which designate play an octave lower or an octave higher...
    8 va?
     
  7. hujo

    hujo

    Apr 18, 2001
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Back in the old days, it was pretty common to use one or two clefs, and move them around freely! A "g-clef" could be anywhere. Nowadays, we almost always use the fixed positions that are associated with bass, alto, tenor and sopran clef. or the F, C, and G clefs, named after the note they indicate.
     
  8. neptoon

    neptoon

    Jul 25, 2000
    summerville, sc
    :confused:

    i also learned about the movable c clef in high school music theory...it looks like a double bar line with the two dots around the line indicating c...if i remember correctly, the dots can be moved around to whatever line the composer wishes....you guys ever heard of this?
     
  9. Aaron

    Aaron

    Jun 2, 2001
    Bellingham, WA
    I thought alto/tenor was movable C clef because it is middle C where the arcs/curved lines meet.
     
  10. neptoon

    neptoon

    Jul 25, 2000
    summerville, sc
    maybe it is....i dunno for sure, though
     
  11. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    that is correct. that's why the clefs are called G clef (the curl surrrounds the G), F clef (the two dots mark the F) and the C clef (as above).
     
  12. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    ...and don't forget the "Chin Clef". It's relatively new, and only used in scores for John Travolta movies. I don't know if it's movable or not...
     
  13. Chris A

    Chris A Chemo sucks!

    Feb 25, 2000
    Manchester NH
    Doesn't viola use C clef? I think French Horn music can be written in C clef, also.


    Chris A.:rolleyes:
     
  14. SuperDuck

    SuperDuck

    Sep 26, 2000
    Wisconsin
    Ah, you forget. The Chin clef has been updated to be used in Ben Affleck movies as well.

    Thanks to everyone for their replies!
     
  15. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY

    Ben WHO? Belafleck?? What?!? Wait, let me guess: some young guy with a dent right smack in the middle of the lowest part of the front of his face, right?

    Damn, I'm getting old...
     
  16. Gentlemen, I have the answer to your clef problems!

    Using my new method of notation, KOOL TABZ, you need not fear the difficulties of confusing accidentals, key signatures, different clefs or knowing what chord you are playing over. TABZ tell you everything you need to know! No musical knowledge or ability needed...

    *Breaks off and runs away to avoid imminent projectile bombardment*

    *Stops on distant hillside and shouts:*

    And I play with a pick! So THERE!!

    *Runs off into the sunset*
     
  17. melvin

    melvin

    Apr 28, 2001
    I think french horn can be written like that, my band teacher was talking about a song where she had a lot of wierd stuff like that.

    I thought viola used the alto clef or something, Ill have to ask my friend to be sure

    I know tenor clef is used a lot for cello and trombone when they get into really high notes.

    Doesnt percussion music have a C clef on it too?
     
  18. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY

    MELVILLE,

    Viola uses alto and treble clefs. Horn uses mostly treble clef, but the extreme low parts of the range are notated in bass clef. Cello and trombone both start out in bass clef, but use tenor clef when the range gets high enough, as you said.

    Non-pitched percussion instruments use a non-pitched "percussion" clef. Sometimes, this notation can include a staff with only four lines on it.
     
  19. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY

    MOON THE BEHIND,

    If you really want to make Big Wheel happy, copy the above post and use it to start a new thread in BG Misc. :) If you really want to get squashed like an insignificant little bug, copy the above post and use it to start a new post anywhere in Castle DB. :eek:
     
  20. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    Sounds to me like you're describing tab. I KNEW IT!!!