Are We Getting Ripped Of In The UK

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by agyeman, Jun 24, 2001.

  1. agyeman

    agyeman Member

    Mar 6, 2001
    Why are prices so cheap in the US? I have seen these prices:

    Fender Standard Jazz Bass

    UK: £349.99 ($492.93)
    US: $349.99

    With international trading being made easier, i don't think the gaps in prices should be so high.
  2. Excessive English tariffs and taxes.
  3. you think THAT´S too much?!

    I would be lucky to get a standard jazz for $1000!

    I once saw a Fender Jazz Standard 4 string fretless.. that was VERY nice. and it was for 190.000 isl. which would´ve been then $2500 but with the current economic status like $1900... it was MIA but that was WAY too much...
  4. agyeman

    agyeman Member

    Mar 6, 2001
    Damn ...

    You must get serious GAS with the amount of bass gear you see, but can't get.
  5. Erlendur Már

    Erlendur Már

    May 24, 2000
    Yeah, it´s terrible, I saw the same fretless bass, it was really beautiful.
  6. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    You have to add shipping too.
    And if Fender use a national distribution company in U.K., they also get their share.
  7. Try living in Australia...

    fender standard jazz bass
    AUS $1149
    that converts over $500 US

    music man stringray basses go for AUS $3000+

    Anything musical is expensive in Australia....
  8. Paul A

    Paul A

    Dec 13, 1999
    Hertfordshire U.K!
    I'd love to know where you can get a Jazz Bass in the u.k. for £350!!!!!.
    That has to be a M.I.M. surely?
    I paid (with case) over £800 (1200 dollars) for an American Standard 'P' ..and that was a year or more ago!
  9. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Well, I don't think this comes into it really - although "tariffs" is meaningless in this context to me! But of course Fender are a US company and they have to export, so there is always going to be an extra cost over the US, in terms of shipping etc.

    But even so, things in the UK are more expensive than anywhere else.The main reason is the "strong pound" - especially as compared to the Euro, but also in regard to the dollar. So there are a few issues here - but mainly the problem is that "Europe" is viewed by any large business like Fender as one "Market" and they will set their prices for that Market.

    Now the thing is that retailers will basically charge what they can get away with - they have overheads and wage bills to pay and as the pound is strong, all of those overheads are higher than mainland Europe. Now if we had a single currency, it would be possible to make a comparison across Europe and say to retailers - well this bass costs
    €xxxxx - so why are you charging us more - I can go to Paris or Berlin and it costs this - you have no excuse to charge more.

    It is quite clear that anyone who thinks that consumer goods are too expensive in the UK should be campaigning to get the government to bring in the Euro as soon as possible!
  10. Paul A

    Paul A

    Dec 13, 1999
    Hertfordshire U.K!
    That has to be the best argument yet that I've read for joining into a single currency.
    I am/was opposed to "the euro" ...... I think I'm changing my mind....
  11. agyeman

    agyeman Member

    Mar 6, 2001
    'Tis the price for a MIM Fender Jazz Bass.
  12. NJXT


    Jan 9, 2001
    Lyon, FRANCE
    Well Paris isn't a good example since a MIM JB costs just a little less than in England, according to agyeman post.
    In France, a standard MIM JB costs 3490 FF
    =532 Euros
    = 460 US$
  13. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Well - this was just an example - at least it's cheaper!! This would equate to quite a lot on the sort of basses I'm buying at about £2,000!

    The point is that with a single European currency, we are able to do the comparisons and find the cheapest price, then put pressure on UK retailers and take the case to the Office of Fair Trading who are looking to prosecute - for example - car retailers who keep the prices high. Without this "transparent" comparison though, it is difficult to even make a start.
  14. NJXT


    Jan 9, 2001
    Lyon, FRANCE
    Good point :D

    I do agree 100% with that.
    It will/would be so much easyer to compare with Euro.
    But I fear Banks will find a way to charge purchases made abroad, even in country part of the Euro zone.
  15. There's also the fact that Fender sell more in USA, and shops clear them out quickly and accept small profit margins.

    Also, the market that Fender addresses in USA seems to be the mid level. For European bassists, though, Fender is generally perceived as serious pro gear.
  16. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I think that Fender as a profit-making organisation and dealers, will charge "what they can get away with". The only factor limiting this is what consumers are prepared to pay - so in the US, bassists are aware what the "going rate" is through the internet and magazines and can negotiate down.

    But it's more difficult in Europe and the "going rate" is confused by the currency differences. If we all (as European bassists) knew that the price of a Mexi Fender was €xxxx in Greece or Germany - or whichever EC country is the cheapest - then we could say to dealers : unless we get that price, then we'll order one from that country!

    This is exactly what has happened in the UK with new car prices. Dealers in the UK have been charging more for identical cars and getting away with it - there is now pressure from consumers and the government is promising to do something about it; but the currency issues make it difficult and it's still the case that the same new cars are thousands of £ cheaper in mainland Europe than the UK and while you can go to a dealer across the channel and buy one and bring it back; the dealers make it difficult and try to put people off. :mad:
  17. brianrost

    brianrost Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 26, 2000
    Boston, Taxachusetts
    So what do you guys pay for Marshalls, Trace Elliot, Soundcraft, Laney, etc.?

    All that stuff is pricey here in the US for the same reason US gear is pricey in the UK.
  18. Oh for god's sake drop the pro-euro stance!! Betcha then when it eventually happens, the price difference stays EXACTLY the same. You're just gulluble to fall for the pro-euro spin.

    I've said before, the new car price difference has very little to do with exchange rates and the weak euro. It has far more to do with the differing rates of tax imposed by the various european governments. When you buy a car abroad you pay UK tax on it and the foreign RRP, so the price comes down.

    You can't justifiably blame the strong pound for the whole price difference, that's just incredibly naive.
  19. Brian,
    A Trace RAH 500-12 head £1,105 ($1,564) and an Ashdown ABM 500 R/M head £1,049 ($1,485)

    I would be very interested to know what they cost in the U.S as I was told a while back that these products cost much less there.

  20. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Well I could say that anybody who is still following the anti-Euro/William Hague line, even after his own party have chucked him out and the country has given this a big "thumbs down" at the general election, has gone way beyond naive towards insanity, but I won't ! ;)

    I will just say that the tax thing is blatant rubbish as many countries like Holland and Denmark pay more tax than the UK , but still get cheaper cars! I think you need to check some facts on this and not just rely on rampant "europhobia"!

    If you want to read any Economist's view on this you will get the same story - only those people who are taken in by far-right propoganda in the UK believ we won't be better off in the Euro. :rolleyes: