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Are you the stars?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by Dragen, Nov 16, 2000.


  1. Dragen

    Dragen

    Aug 31, 2000
    Are you the stars of your gigs? Are you frontfigures? I have the impression that bassists very rarely are. It's always those singers and geetarists who fills that part,...at least in my experience. And one more thing: What do you with a singer who doesn't sing....yet. He's a good friend so I want to help him. Any advise on that......(should've asked this in a singer's forum, perhaps?)
     
  2. Often (but not always) it is much harder to play bass and sing at the same time than it is to sing and play guitar. Which makes people like Sting, Geddy Lee, etc. all the more amazing. Sting has commented at length on this subject.
     
  3. brewer9

    brewer9

    Jul 5, 2000
    In my band the guitarist is very non-moving on stage so me and the singer pick up the slack. I enjoy getting attention and it works out well.
     
  4. bassmonkeee

    bassmonkeee Supporting Member

    Sep 13, 2000
    Decatur, GA
    I play in a mostly instrumental trio with guitar and drums, so I end up taking solos in most of the songs, or at least a breakdown with the drummer. It's alot of fun to both hold down the bottom, and to also get a chance to show off. I wouldn't say I was a star, though. Most people say they are surprised that they can't tell who the bandleader is in our group. I like that. It's tought to find people to play with without someone usually trying to take over and make it "their" band.
     
  5. noise

    noise Guest

    Oct 23, 2000
    Berkeley, CA
    Why is this, that bassists have a harder time singing than guitarists? And where do I find Sting's commentary? Thanks!

    --noise
     


  6. Why is this, that bassists have a harder time singing than guitarists? And where do I find Sting's commentary? Thanks!

    --noise
    [/B][/QUOTE]

    Mainly because the bass player usually is much more in sync with the drummer and more rhythmic. Maybe I should say that it's more difficult to play more complex bass parts and sing. If all you are playing is straight quarter or eighth notes, you shouldn't have any problems. And remember, most guitar players are playing over, not with, the rhythm section.

    As far as Sting's words, do a google search for sting interviews. I'm sure you'll find something.
     
  7. Jay

    Jay

    Oct 19, 2000
    Bidwell, OH
    <i>Mainly because the bass player usually is much more in sync with the drummer and more rhythmic. Maybe I should say that it's more difficult to play more complex bass parts and sing. If all you are playing is straight quarter or eighth notes, you shouldn't have any problems. And remember, most guitar players are playing over, not with, the rhythm section.</i>

    Interesting thought, though I haven't been playing long (3 yrs) and I don't find it quite difficult enough to get both parts (bass & vocals) going good at the same time. I play mostly rock and heavy metal...any thoughts on the style of music affecting difficulty of singing and grooving?

    J
     
  8. I am the Moon and the Stars, I am Alpha and Omega . . .Oh never mind that was a book i was reading
     
  9. corinpills

    corinpills

    Nov 19, 2000
    Boston, MA
    The interaction between bass and vocals is something that I've been working on for a long time and I've actually read Sting's comments on it because we sing in the same register. First off, it has to be acknowleged (and Sting has said this) that Paul McCartney invented this. You just never saw a bass player sing lead vocals before Macca, it wasn't done. Luckily, nobody told him that. What Sting says is that you have to sort've picture the bass and the vocal line like two railroad tracks that seperate and come together. In my partiular situation, I enjoy the fact that I control the top and the bottom of our music. Let those silly guitarists do what they want, I got the ends covered.

    I think that one of the reasons that singing and playing bass is initially difficult is that, in a lot of cases (but certainly not all), the bass line will emphasize the down beat and vocal lines tend to put more emphasis on other beats.
     
  10. kcm

    kcm

    Jun 17, 2000
    Woking, Surrey.
    Listen to Mark King for classic Slap bass usually machine gun sixteenths plus singing all the time too!!!
     
  11. In my band I get enough attention mostly because I'm somewhat hyper on stage and it looks like I'm enjoying myself.If it looks like you're having a good time,the audience usuallly does too.I figure an "off" night on stage is better than my best day at the office.