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Aren't Modulus Quantums supposed to be free of dead spots?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by cjazz50, Jul 7, 2001.


  1. I just bought a Modulus Quantum 6 string and while I love the bass overall, it is definitely not free of dead spots. It has dead spots around E and F on both the C and G strings. Also, the last 5 frets on the C string don’t have much sustain either. This isn't really a huge issue. I was just wondering whether this is normal or unusual.
     
  2. i'm not sure how normal it may be for that bass, but for that amount of money i'd contact modulus. they have a good rep for customer service so they'll probably help you out. i'd just have to say check with them.
     
  3. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    I've NEVER seen that...give me some specs for your bass, please! I can't imagine that would happen with graphite...do you have a wood fretboard on it?
     
  4. I was just curious as to how well you like that bass and how much it was? I'm thinking of getting one of those down the road just because I love their sound. I've played the 5 string quantum and the price at the shop was about $3,900 canadian, around $2500 American I guess. How much more would the Quantum 6 be?

    I think the fretboard was ebony, but I could be wrong. It's been a while since I've played it. Anyhow, ebony with the graphite neck sounded really nice. But, I'd like to hear about yours though. I'm also going to check out their website.

    reedith
     
  5. Mine has a grenadillo fingerbord ,plain walnut top, and EMG pickups with the 3-band EQ. I really like the sound and the feel of this bass. If it didn't have dead spots, it would be perfect. I got it for $2300 (US) from Bass Northwest.
     
  6. Here's a picture of it from bassnw.com.
     
  7. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    Hey, I think I've played that bass! I think...

    Anyway, it's definitely in the fingerboard. Grenadillo is a lot like rosewood...very porous, and not especially stiff...or at all! I'd contact Modulus and tell them about it. "Deadspots" tend to be a lot more common in softer woods, and they aren't even existent in graphite.

    IMO, if I were you, I'd get a composite neck, or have them put a new fretboard on it that isn't so soft but still is warmer, like Pau Ferro. Though I'd suspect that would require a new neck. You also should contact Bass NW and tell them about it, over the phone. If you are really dissatisfied, I'm sure they could exchange it.
     
  8. Peter Parker

    Peter Parker Banned

    Jun 10, 2001
    I've played graphite neck basses that had dead spots. I had a Zon that had a deadspot around the 15th fret on the G string. I played a Modulus 6 string that had two deadspots on the C string. Both instruments had phenolic fingerboards which is extremely hard. Graphite can have deadspots but much less likely than wood necks.
     
  9. RAM

    RAM

    May 10, 2000
    Chicago, IL
    Hmmm...dead spots on graphite, huh? It's highly unlikely that the dead spots are actually caused by the graphite, though not impossible, I s'pose.

    Anyway, I'd bet almost anything that your dead spot issues are related to a high fret or two. I never thought that could be the problem but have since learned, first hand, that uneven frets can have more of an effect than the woods and construction in creating dead spots.

    I'd get the frets professionally leveled, and if under warranty, have it done for free;)
     
  10. Peter Parker

    Peter Parker Banned

    Jun 10, 2001
    I don't believe a high fret will cause a deadspot. It might cause a note to fret out but not be an actual deadspot. Now a fret that's not properly seated in the fretboard and kind of just floating in it could cause one. The Zon I had was a fretless with a deadspot. Joe Zon swithed the neck out and all was well.
     
  11. RAM

    RAM

    May 10, 2000
    Chicago, IL
    I have to disagree. Peter - your issue may or may not have been a fret issue. If Joe Zon, the reputable man that he is, felt that you needed a new neck, then I'm sure that it wasn't as simple as a high fret.

    But, in other cases, when you fret a note behind the high fret, the high fret will inhibit some of the strings vibrations causing the string to stop vibrating prematurely. To prove this, I bought a Jazz bass with a really bad dead spot on the D# of the G string. I wanted to have some work done (swap the pickups) and the repair shop suggested the deadspot can be fixed with a fret-level. I was skeptical, but now I'm not.

    If you have any doubts, take the bass to a reputable repair shop. They'll tell you if they think the dead spot can be fixed with a fret level.
     
  12. Peter Parker

    Peter Parker Banned

    Jun 10, 2001
    Hey, Ram the Zon I had was a FRETLESS so it definitely wasn't a fret issue it was just a good ol' fashion deadspot with no cure. Fender are notorius for having dead spots around the C#-D# area on the G string and that has absolutely nothing to do with frets being unlevel. It may have caused it in your case but not 95% of most other cases. Do a search on deadspots and you'll find almost all the causes.
     
  13. Mine doesn't have a graphite neck but it DOES have 2 or 3 past the 12th fret on the D and G strings. :(
     
  14. John Ruiz

    John Ruiz

    Oct 9, 2000
    Plano, Tx
    I got my Q6 on Ebay for USD $1800 brand new. It has a 5A quilted maple top and composite fretboard, w/bartolini's. I love the way it plays, very smooth!

    Here are some pics
     
  15. RAM

    RAM

    May 10, 2000
    Chicago, IL
    Peter, I'm sure your Zon was a Fretless. I never said it wasn't.

    I agree that Fenders do often have dead spots between the C#-D# range. But, that's not what cjazz's issue is: he's got several dead spots, much higher up on the neck, and on multiple strings. That simply doesn't fit your definition of a dead spot and might be able to be fixed with a simple fret leveling. If you have a problem with my suggestion, talk to a reputable repair shop and they'll tell you the same thing. It'd be a good learning experience for you;)
     
  16. It's not like it's impossible for a carbon-fiber neck to have dead spots, it's just not common. The dead spot is the note closest to the neck's resonant frequency. Depending on the amount of epoxy used in the carbon-fiber blend (more epoxy=stiffer but more "sterile"), the neck's resonant frequency can be raised or lowered significantly. In most "graphite" necks, the resonant frequency is lower than that of the lowest note, so it's a non-issue, but a more malleable blend could theoretically have some dead spots.

    But, as previous posters have stated, this is probably a fret/fingerboard issue.
     
  17. Peter Parker

    Peter Parker Banned

    Jun 10, 2001
    Ram I was referring to deadspots in general and the fact that graphite necks can have them. His case could be a problem with frets or or it could be multiple deadspots as graphite necks react differently than wood and if the didn't get their recipe right with that neck it could be something more involved than frets. As far as going to a reputable repair person I have a pretty good reputation for repair in my area after 10 years though I'm no expert but I've talked to many. But thanks for the advice anyway.
     
  18. It doesn’t seem like a fret problem to me. The dead spots at E and F (actually D through F# with the worst on E and F) on the C string are the kind where the fundamental quickly drops out leaving the upper harmonics. I don't see how a high fret could cause this. The ones at the top of the C string cause the whole series of harmonics to decay quickly. The string is literally silent after a few seconds. The worst ones here are F, Ab, and B.
     
  19. Peter Parker

    Peter Parker Banned

    Jun 10, 2001
    Hey cjazz. I've always found higher pitched notes on graphite necks to be dead sounding. I played a fretless Modulus 6 and the C string past the 17th fret and up had very little sustain, very lifeless. Deadspots seem a lot more noticeable on fretless basses so be glad you have a fretted. I could on with my philosphy of why high notes on graphite sound dead but I have no proof so I won't bore you. Besides, RAM will attack me. Just kidding.