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Arrghh! Can't find a band!

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by Cambass, Jul 12, 2001.


  1. Well, I've been playing for 2 years. Actually I've been playing in my room for two years. I just want to get out there and play! Problem is I can't find a band. I always look in the music shop notice boards in town but most ads are for heavy metal, punk or Limp Biscuit clone bands (Which is very far from what I want to play). At the start of this year I did join up with a guy but he's deserted me and joined another band.

    I'm getting worried that if I don't start playing with other musicians soon that it'll be too late. Have I left it too late to start playing? I mean, I practise every day and I think I'm coming along ok, but I think I could progress 10 fold if I join a band. Plus, it affects my confidence to go out there and offer my services as a bassplayer. What if I'm no good or I stuff majorly?
     
  2. CS

    CS

    Dec 11, 1999
    UK
    Audition for all the local bands, at least you will get experience re auditions. I suggest being a bit mercenary and joining one of the Blimp Riskit clones whatever (just pick one with decent people in it) if asked of course and get some experience playing. Stick with it and get some gigs. Whilst this goes on look around for other musicians and try writing some stuff, then you can form your own band latter. When leaving any band give them loads of notice fulfil existing commitments and give a good reason for leaving

    You could even be honest enough to tell them up front its a stop gap. I have found that honesty is the best policy. (I have not got any friends though).
     
  3. foolfighter24

    foolfighter24 Guest

    Apr 22, 2000
    Arizona
    Don't find one. Make one. Its tough, thats what I'm doing right now, and it is difficult to find people who you can work with. That way, you don't really have to conform to somebody elses styles. Also, jam with as many people as possible. Thats a great way to get in the loop, and a great way to audition.

    I don't know if you go to church or not, but I do, and I play in our youth chruch band, and that has been such a great time and I have really picked up on cool things. Its really great.
     
  4. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    Cam - You're dead right about how your playing will improve by playing with other musicians.

    Obviously, you're think you're good enough to go and try. That's all it takes. Can you play along competently with music on the radio or CD's? If so, there's no reason you can't at the very least get out there and play simple root notes with others just to get started, (unless your immediate intention is to play within a more complex musical idiom like jazz). Aren't there some AC/DC wannabes down there? It doesn't get much easier for a bassist than that.

    One thing great about breaking into a developing band as a bassist - their music fundamentally just needs someone who can fill up the bass frequency range, not someone laying out tasty bass lines. That will come with time.

    As foolfighter implied, be proactive. It's just like looking for a 9-to-5 job -> if you don't see an ad for what you want, you go out and apply where there may be a spot for you.

    So, don't rely on ads looking for bassists. Put up your own ads telling something about yourself and how to contact you.

    Take a look at www.themode.com . Australian bands have some stuff going on there, (they do listings by country). Put up your own ad there, it's free.

    Lastly, if I were in your shoes, I would even go for openings with bands that play music you don't particularly like and play it as well as I knew how. Even if you can't influence the musical direction of the band once you are firmly established with them, you get your name into the network. IME, most bands fill spots through the musician grapevine, through word of mouth....."so-and-so's bassist is leaving. Know anyone?" Some people who are bassists in happening bands got the gig because they knew someone and happened to be in right spot at the right time. Some of them didn't even play bass electric at the time!!! (e.g., Christian Olde Wolbers of Fear Factory).

    Bottomline, if you keep playing in your room and no one even knows you have a rig, you're not going to get contacted.
    And if you're not good enough to make the cut, so what? You now know what it takes. And there are a bunch of other aspiring guitarists, drummers, keyboardists, etc., out there looking for a bassist who will just give it a try.