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Attention Dillinger Escape Plans and Techcore geeks

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Osama_Spears, May 14, 2005.


  1. Hey guys...

    Im just trying to find some insight on Dillinger's use of theory to create the music they do. I mean,I know there is alot of tritones and dissonance used, alot of chromatic scaling as well - but Im just looking for some more specific knowledge on what they play,etc.

    SOunds confusing,sorry...thanks in advance.
     
  2. it's not really that complex... just fast.
     
  3. Tash

    Tash

    Feb 13, 2005
    Bel Air Maryland
    Its all based on post-tonal 20th century compositional technique. Read up on set theory and 12 tone composition and practice your polyrythm and syncopation skills. Those are the building blocks.
     
  4. 12 tone composition? care to elaborate?
     
  5. That'd be crap then. :p
     
  6. Adam Barkley

    Adam Barkley Mayday!

    Aug 26, 2003
    Jackson, MS
    Tangent.
     
  7. Tash

    Tash

    Feb 13, 2005
    Bel Air Maryland
    A composition technique formalized by Arnold Schoenberg in the early 20s that uses all 12 pitches without emphasis or preference toward any particular pitch or collection of pitches. No note can be repeated until all 12 notes have been used. 12 tone compositions are built on the idea of a particular "row", or string of all 12 possible notes, instead of a "key".

    More info here:
    http://www.cwu.edu/~compose/PostTonal_5.html

    I am pretty new to this myself, so far I've done only a single short composition using 12 tone technique. It is very intriguing though and intend to pursue it further with my private comp teacher before I go on to finish my degree.
     

  8. leave my thread.
     
  9. kingbrutis

    kingbrutis

    Aug 10, 2003
    Phoenix AZ
    I have seen DEP 6 times and have never been all that impressed with thier bassist. Dont get me wrong, he is better than I'll ever be, but thier guitars are the driving force. I cant help you with thier theory, but as a band, they are the best at what they do. Later Joe
     
  10. Nick man

    Nick man

    Apr 7, 2002
    Tampa Bay
    Thats really interesting. Though I dont plan on writing music in DEP's style, I think I might try that for a few songs.
     
  11. xshawnxearthx

    xshawnxearthx

    Aug 23, 2004
    new jersey
    their first bassist(the one who was paralized ina car wreck) was so much better then the one they have now.
     
  12. Excuseeeeeeeeeee me? :eyebrow:
     
  13. Adam Barkley

    Adam Barkley Mayday!

    Aug 26, 2003
    Jackson, MS
    You replyed to a General Instruction thread just to troll and neatly dodged the original question with a inane quip that was clearly not asked. Therefore you went out on a tangent.

    Do I need to explain further or do you have a grasp on it?
     
  14. 43% burnt

    43% burnt an actor who wants to run the whole show

    May 4, 2004
    Bridgeport, CT
    ^he he...thats funny^

    Very interesting...I never really understood the theory behind some of their writing.

    The older bass player was very good. Live, I'm always amazed by their guitarist...how does he play that stuff while going completely ape-s**t on stage??
     
  15. Question:

    When they play these 12 tone compositions,do they play them in a line(ex: G,G#,A,A#,B,C,etc) or "all over the place"(ex: G,B,C,A#,D#,etc)?

    Im gonna say all over the place,because I cant see how they can just go up and down the same scale over and over again :p
     
  16. Tash

    Tash

    Feb 13, 2005
    Bel Air Maryland
    I think they have very selective use of atonality. There certainly isnt' anything in true 12 tone (which can be very beautiful and cool, or sound like monkeys hitting pianos). I have figured out a couple DEP songs for a friend and they did uses short atonal passages that were kind of like hexachordal rows repeated and rearranged.

    That and they syncopate, a lot, to the point that I wonder if they don't choose their rythyms by throwing darts at a sheet of paper or something.
     
  17. O ok. I knew that. :bag:
     
  18. Deadworks

    Deadworks

    Dec 13, 2004
    St.Louis, MO
    Abark, There's a couple spots in the song 4th grade drop out that might be atonal scale based, It could just be atonal, it's pushing midnight and I have no ambition at this point to grab the gee-tar and test it. Well, I shouldn't say based it's two guitar runs that might be an atonal scale. The song isn't based off an atonal pattern.

    The guitars may take advantage of them to shred now and then but there's no songs of theirs that I know are constructed from atonal scale pattern. I think that'd be too weird, even for them.

    Somtimes I wonder how much of their writing boils down to *random finger placement shredding* "Hey this sound's F'd up...lets use it!" ?
     
  19. mishi_ono

    mishi_ono

    May 7, 2004
    Oakland, CA
    no this concept is simply known as serialism.
    placing equal value on all 12 notes creates a certain lack of
    key center and tonic.
    lack of repitition in rhythm as well as melodic choice is also common practice.
    scoenberg hated the term atonalism and insisted his music be
    classified as pantonic

    i doubt dillinger escape plan composes serial passages as they not only use high amounts of repitition within their music
    but they also have very evident key centers.
    they only sound 'atonal' to untrained ears due to high tempos and plenty of filler notes that move by dissonance rather
    than consonance.
     
  20. skunkrawk

    skunkrawk

    Apr 25, 2003
    DC
    i just learned about serialism in music theory at school, its reallly interesting (i love dissonance), but i dont think dillinger uses it that much. in an interview with them i read that one of the guitar players (maybe both) only knows very simple and basic theory and that when writing a part they start out with a concept based loosely on basic music theory and then kind of forget the rules and just tweak it until it sounds how they want (without paying much attention to theory.) i also read that the drummer spent a few semesters at berkeley and instead of majoring in performance for drums he majored in synthesized sound. am i the only dillinger fan who was disappointed by miss machine?