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Attn: Doublers!!!!!! I need to switch quickly!!!!!!

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [DB]' started by jb63, Jan 21, 2004.


  1. jb63

    jb63

    Jan 3, 2002
    Cleveland, Ohio
    I'm in a bit a of a quandary. I need a stand that will hold my UB in "playing position" or somewhat close to playing position. I currently play electric for this gig but I want to start doubling. Our show moves very quickly with very little time for me to switch instruments. Plus the stage set up usually very tight. To complicate things, I'm required to sit on a stool while performing and I also sing while playing. I need to be able to switch quickly while seated, and as far as my mic goes, I can swing it out of my way but I won't have time to adjust it otherwise. I also need to be within arms reach my charts and my amp. Sorry, I can't afford a roadie.

    I'm currently considering buying a Hamiltion stand or something similar. When playing UB I think I'll be able to take the bass out the arms of the stand and leave the end pin in the little cup while playing and then when I need to stwich over I can just set it back in the stand and pick up the electric and go. I've read most of the threads out there about stands. I know the Hamilton isn't the most stable stand available, but at this point I don't see any other alternative. What do you all think? Any input or suggestion will be greatly apreciated.
     
  2. Probably the best stand for doubling was the Redi-Rest bass stand. It is basically a tripod with a socket with an endpin on it. It was originally made for Kay basses but they included an endpin socket for those not using Kays (or Englehardts) Unfortunately, It has not been made for many years. However, you might do an internet search and put some ads in the wanted columns. I've often wondered why no one has come out with an updated version of this type of stand.
     
  3. lermgalieu

    lermgalieu Supporting Member

    Apr 27, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    jb63, I'd advise against planning on leaving the endpin in the little nub of the Hamilton stand while playing seated. I sit on a stool while rehearsing, and occasionally have problems with the endpin slipping on the carpet even without being in a cup like that. That said, if you find a stand you like, its pretty easy to 'hop' it out of the stand, you can even move the bass around a bit while playing once you get used to it.
     
  4. Damon Rondeau

    Damon Rondeau Journeyman Clam Artist Supporting Member

    Nov 19, 2002
    Winnipeg, baby
    A little bit of sideways thinking: why not put the EB on a playable stand? We've got a player here in town with bad back trouble. His EB is mounted on a modified mike stand (some welding involved, kids.) Might be easier and safer. Just lay the DB down on its ribs when you're not playing -- just takes 2 or 3 seconds to switch...
     
  5. It depends how quickly you need to switch. I have the same problem, but I usually have 8-12 bars to switch back and forth. I just lay my DB down on its side and throw my electric strap over my head. Going back is usually faster (DB -> electric).

    Otherwise, I have a Hamilton stand for my EUB (no way to nicely set it down!). You could probably play the bass with it in this stand if you had to.

    There is another stand that folds out to an A frame...not sure of the name of it though.
     
  6. Damon Rondeau

    Damon Rondeau Journeyman Clam Artist Supporting Member

    Nov 19, 2002
    Winnipeg, baby
    The problem with A-frame stands is the element that holds the neck. For playability, you won't want any stand that cradles the neck. That takes a lot of stands out of the picture...
     
  7. jb63

    jb63

    Jan 3, 2002
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Thanks for the replies folks. There is no room on stage me to lay my bass down on it's side. I'm begining to think I may have to fabricate something to hold my UB. I'm thinking something similar to a guitar stand with two arms that hold the bottom of the bass and two arms that hold the waist (I'm not sure of the teminology). Basically a cross between the A-frame stand and the Hamilton. I have seen a stand like the one I've just described but I have no idea who makes it and have yet to find one on the internet. I remember watching a guy who had his bass in one, he walked right up to it and start playing. The Kay redi-rest sounds very interesting. It looks like it is a ball and socket design. Will it hold a bass vertically all by itself? Will using it bend my endpin?
     
  8. Yes, that's the beauty of the Redi-Rest. The socket has a fixed postion to hold the bass self supporting, and just move the bass out of that postion and it allows you to play any the normal positions with the bass leaning toward the player. The endpin is part of the stand, so you don't even use your normal endpin rod. It requires an endpin with the same size rod as the Kay/Englehardt. They included a socket with the stand to go on basses that had a different size rod. Here's another shot of the Redi-Rest attached to a bass free standing. I had one of these in the 1960's when I was playing shows that required doubling on Plank. It worked great.
     
  9. jb63

    jb63

    Jan 3, 2002
    Cleveland, Ohio
    The redi-rest is exactly what I need!!!!
    Do you know where I can get one?
     
  10. Like I said earlier, they have not been made for many years and you'll just have to try internet searches and wanted columns. It is spelled Redi-Rest.
     
  11. Over here in the UK is a cheap (£30 ish) but very practical stand called a gig stand and its made in the uk. Two sloping padded bars hold the bottom of the bass and a shaped rubber coated wire holds the top of the neck. Its very robust, stable and folds neatly. It has one serious drawback - if you extend the endpin far the bass won't sit on the stand. I'm 5'11 and have no problem with this at the moment but ONLY since I started holding the bass upright. Alternatively there is a tripod that looks a bit simmilar to Bobs redi rest. This costs £90. Both available from Caswells in Bristol 0117 929 4642. This is a superb shop where you can ring them up and they have knowledge and understanding to send you what you want at a resonable price quickly. They have no web pages I'm afraid. Well worth ringing for a catalogue though.

    For once you can get something here you can't in the US?? - I'll be ******!
     
  12. jb63

    jb63

    Jan 3, 2002
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Thank you all very much for the info. I'll keep poking around the net for a while and I may give that shop in the UK a call. I'm really sold on the tripod idea but 90 pounds is a bit steep in my opinion. I talked with a friend of mine about it and he seems to think we can build one. We're both skilled machinists so I think we'll be able to come up with something that will do the job. If and when we get it built, I'll post a pic for eveyone.
     
  13. If it is anything like the Redi-Rest, 90 pounds (about $165 US) sound pretty reasonable. The last Redi-Rest on eBay went for over $200.
     
  14. jb63

    jb63

    Jan 3, 2002
    Cleveland, Ohio

    Do you think it's reasonable to assume there's a market for a cheaper version that does the same job?
     
  15. The only way to know is to make some and try to sell them. One feature the Redi-Rest has that is nice is that it folds up in to a small easy to carry unit. You probably coundn't afford to make one like they did. The legs and most of the other parts (except the endpin) were all solid cast aluminum.
     
  16. Chasarms

    Chasarms Casual Observer

    May 24, 2001
    Bettendorf, IA USA
    I played a Christmas concert with a local singer/songwriter back in December. As fate would have it, the final set list had me switching from EBG to DB almost every song. I was also limited in space, but I did have room for a DB stand and a EBG stand.

    I just used a regular guitar stand for my Modulus, but bought on of those new Ingles stands for my bass. It is nice in that it is basically a giant guitar stand. It is pretty easy to remove and replace the bass on and the lower arms that hold the bottom of the bass are adjustable. So, you can sit the bass on the stand even if you have the endpin pretty high.

    It worked OK for me. It only takes a few seconds to put one on the stand and grab the other.
     
  17. Alexi David

    Alexi David

    May 15, 2003
    NYC
    Well, there's a redi-rest on EBAY at the moment - interesting
     
  18. John Sprague

    John Sprague Sam Shen's US Distributor

    Mar 10, 2003
    Rochester, NY
    Sales Manager, CSC Products Inc.
    I use Ingles stands to photograph basses, the neck brace comes right off, leaving the bottom supports and the back pad holding the bass up. Reasonably stable. It may be a better cost solution for you.
     
  19. jb63

    jb63

    Jan 3, 2002
    Cleveland, Ohio
    I did end up adapting a tripod from a microphone stand and it worked fairly well although in order to get the bass into playing position I had to tilt it over onto two legs. I drew up a ball and socket design but my friend couldn't afford tie up his machinery for my "government" job. If I ever get around to buying a digital camera I'll post some pics.