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auxiliary tones

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Skeletomania, Apr 11, 2010.


  1. Skeletomania

    Skeletomania

    Oct 25, 2005
    hong kong
    Can I ask what exactly are auxiliary tones?
     
  2. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    they're little extra tones that you might throw in with the main note to give it some color. like say you're playing a D note, but you might hit an E for a split second then go back on the D and hold it. if you know what a trill is, where you play two notes back and forth quickly over and over, that's the idea. it's easier to understand if you actually hear it, though.
     
  3. Skeletomania

    Skeletomania

    Oct 25, 2005
    hong kong
    Is it kind of like passing tones?
     
  4. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    they can be, sure.

    edit: i'd probably say aux tones can be passing tones, but not necessarily vice versa. aux tones are within a step of the main note. passing tones don't have to be. but honestly, that's a distinction without a whole lot of difference. me personally, i'd lump them all into the passing tone category.
     
  5. http://www.music.vt.edu/musicdictionary/
    Auxiliary tone
    In part writing, an ornamentation such as a grace note, which is an unaccented, non-harmonic note immediately above or below a principal or harmonic note.

    I looked up passing notes and after reading the definition I'm still not sure.........

    The pentatonic scale has three chord tones and "two safe passing notes".
    C, D, E G A --- D and A are the passing notes. I've also heard that passing notes are not to fall on the beat and they should not last long or call attention to themselves.

    Only the shadow knows the real story.
     
  6. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    or cares.

    anyway, that's usually the way passing notes work out. they're usually thought to be better to be played on weak beats. but i've also used chordal tones as passing notes and played the passing tones on strong beats. you can do anything if you do it in a cool way.
     
  7. Chris K

    Chris K

    May 3, 2009
    Gorinchem,The Netherlands
    Partner: Otentic Guitars
    IMO, a passing note is a note that has some function in the chord progression, connecting two notes with harmonical function (= 'chord notes' - hate to call them that way, but to clarify...). Like Jim says, they'd better be played on weak beats.

    The auxiliary note is a note without any harmonic function, to add color. They can be played anywhere you like to splash some red paint.
     
  8. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    actually malcolm said that. i just agreed that they're better on weak beats usually. i use them all the time on strong beats, though. like i might start a solo on the one with a #2-3-5 8th note thing. i hear stuff like that a lot. the key to doing it is picking your spots, though. you can play any note in any key at any given time if you pick the right spot for it.

    honestly, it's a term that for me went in one ear and out the other because there was always a better and more specific term you could use instead...like grace notes or passing tones. if i were the op, i wouldn't give it a second thought past this thread unless it's on a test.
     
  9. Chris K

    Chris K

    May 3, 2009
    Gorinchem,The Netherlands
    Partner: Otentic Guitars
    Right - I tried to look up a translation for auxiliary notes in my language (Dutch) - couldn't find it :rollno:
    For grace notes, ornamentals, passing tones, changing notes etc. we do have our terms - which makes me wonder: does the term 'auxiliary notes' really exist?
     

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